Trump enters the stage

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Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Tue May 21, 2019 8:06 pm

Rolling Stone
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Trump Took Another Terrifying Step Toward Authoritarianism at His Rally in Pennsylvania
Jailing one’s political enemies doesn’t seem plausible in America — until it does

RYAN BORT
MAY 21, 2019 9:57AM EDT


President Donald Trump pumps his fist to the crowd after speaking to a campaign rally in Montoursville, PaTrump, Montoursville, USA - 20 May 2019
Evan Vucci/AP/REX/Shutterstock
President Donald Trump traveled to Pennsylvania on Monday to stand in front of Air Force One and speak to a fired-up crowd of supporters. Some of his time onstage was spent hammering 2020 election talking points, like immigration (“We don’t want people coming up here! Our country is full!”); the rest was spent rambling about whatever happened to cross his mind. The president is expected to officially launch his reelection campaign next month, for instance, and he’s been wondering about a new slogan. “Do we want Keep America Great or Make America Great Again?” he said before asking the audience to judge each option with applause. Keep America Great won. Trump agreed: “I like it because we’ll sell many, many more hats that way.”


Related
U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, speaks during a campaign rally announcing her candidacy for president in Waikiki, in HonoluluElection 2020 Tulsi Gabbard, Honolulu, USA - 02 Feb 2019
We've Hit a New Low in Campaign Hit Pieces
Republican Congressman Destroys Arguments That Trump Didn't Obstruct Justice
Trump’s rallies are also where some of the president’s most dangerous impulses get fleshed out into the open, like earlier this month in Panama City Beach, Florida, when he joked about shooting migrants at the border. His appearance at the Williamsport Regional Airport on Monday was no exception, providing the latest, terrifying look into the president’s tendency toward authoritarianism, which is becoming less of a tendency and more of an full-throated embrace as he continues to bend the government to his will.

One of the hallmarks of authoritarianism is jailing one’s political enemies, an idea to which Trump is no stranger. He’s called for an investigation into Hillary Clinton for years now — especially at rallies, where he knows he can get the crowd lathered into a “Lock Her Up!” frenzy — but actually doing so seemed implausible, like something that couldn’t actually happen in America. This is no longer the case.

After Trump accused Democrats and the FBI of treason Monday night, he stepped away from the podium to bask in a “Lock Them Up!” chant. When he returned to the microphone, he reminded his supporters that Attorney General William Barr is in his pocket, and that the new, compliant head of the Justice Department is going to “give it a very fair look” to jailing of those involved in the Russia investigation for treason.




“@SpeakerPelosi @TeamPelosi I would be pleased to speak to you as an expert on how authoritarian regimes take hold, with this as a warning sign,” tweeted Ruth Ben-Ghiat, an authoritarianism historian at New York University. “This is scary to watch,” added Sen. Chris Murphy (D-CT). Others, like former Office of Government Ethics Director Walter Shaub, likened the comments to something out of Nazi Germany. “Shades of 1937,” he wrote.

Barr has come under widespread scrutiny for his efforts to protect the president in the wake of the release of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s findings, particularly those regarding obstruction of justice. Despite the Mueller report containing overwhelming evidence that the president sought to obstruct the inquiry, the attorney general took it upon himself to clear the president of any wrongdoing. On Saturday, Rep. Justin Amash (R-MI) became the first Republican lawmaker to call out Barr’s handling of the report, alleging that he deliberately misrepresented the special counsel’s findings. Amash also wrote that the report makes clear that Trump deserves to be impeached. On Monday, he doubled down by dismantling several popular arguments that the president did not obstruct justice.

Last week, Barr took the offensive in his ostensible role as Trump’s unofficial personal attorney, ordering a U.S. attorney in Connecticut to begin investigating the origins of the Russia investigation. In other words, the “very fair look” is already underway.

Another hallmark of authoritarianism is refusing to give up power. Again, Trump is no stranger to entertaining the idea of hanging around the White House for longer than the Constitution stipulates. He has on several occasions “joked” about staying in office for more than two terms. This, too, seems like something that could never actually happen in America. As with jailing one’s political enemies, that’s only true until it isn’t.


“We’re going to have a second [term], and then we’re going to have another one,” Trump said Monday night. “We’ll drive them crazy. And maybe if we really like it a lot, and if things keep going like they are going, we’ll go and we’ll do what we have to do, and a three [terms] and a four, and a five.”


Though House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has yet to come around to the idea of impeaching the president, she has expressed concern that he will not voluntarily give up power. This is why, she has said, she doesn’t want to get bogged down with impeachment proceedings, instead preferring to focus on winning 2020 by such a large margin that Trump won’t be able to contest the results. “We have to inoculate against that, we have to be prepared for that,” she told the New York Times earlier this month, speaking of the prospect that Trump will refuse to cede power should he lose. “He would poison the public mind,” she added of her thinking prior to the 2018 midterm election. “He would challenge each of the races; he would say you can’t seat these people. We had to win. Imagine if we hadn’t won — oh, don’t even imagine. So, as we go forward, we have to have the same approach.”

Two days after the Times ran Pelosi’s comments, Trump retweeted a frightening idea from Jerry Falwell, Jr., his most prominent supporter in the evangelical community. “I now support reparations,” he wrote. “Trump should have 2 yrs added to his 1st term as pay back for time stolen by this corrupt failed coup.”

It sounds like a joke. Don’t be fooled.





© 2019 PMC. All rights reserved.
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Re: Trump enters the strategy

Postby Meno_ » Tue May 21, 2019 11:42 pm

Fox News





DONALD TRUMP

Published May 21, 2019

Last Update 3 hrs ago

Angry Dem says Trump ‘raping the country,’ as impeachment push nears critical mass

By Ronn Blitzer | Fox News





A rapid-fire string of developments has congressional Democrats putting increased pressure on party brass to launch impeachment proceedings against President Trump, with one rank-and-file lawmaker reportedly saying the president is “raping the country” and others indicating it's only a matter of time before leadership changes course on the politically fraught issue.

Amid the internal tensions, Speaker Nancy Pelosi called a special meeting of House Democrats for Wednesday morning, where the impeachment issue and other battles are expected to be discussed.

Prior meetings involving Pelosi and top Democrats held Monday evening escalated into heated exchanges, with the party torn over how to address Trump controversies -- most recently, the decision to block the former White House counsel from testifying. Democratic leaders, who for the most part have not been publicly in favor of impeachment, are now finding it difficult to maintain their position as calls grow from the ranks to flip that switch.

HOUSE JUDICIARY CHAIRMAN NADLER: TRUMP IS MAKING IT 'MORE DIFFICULT' NOT TO CONSIDER IMPEACHMENT 

A senior House Democrat told Fox News late Monday that Pelosi “isn’t going to be able to hold off on impeachment much longer,” and that the speaker may have to change her position “within the next two weeks.”



Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., while saying Pelosi is working to bring the party together, suggested Tuesday that politics
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The wall become symbol of conflicting parties pushed to the wall:


Pelosi:

"Under increased pressure from progressive members of the Democratic caucus and constituents to move more aggressively toward impeachment proceedings, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Wednesday morning used her strongest language to date against President Donald Trump as she accused him of being “engaged in a cover-up.”

“We do believe that it is important to follow the facts,” Pelosi told reporters in the nation’s capitol following a closed-door meeting with House Democrats. “We believe that no one is above the law, including the president of the United States, and we believe the president of the United States is engaged in a cover up, in a cover up.”
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Re: Trump enters the stage Genius?

Postby Meno_ » Fri May 24, 2019 1:24 am

POLITICO

'Extremely stable genius': Trump defends his mental fitness as he tears into Pelosi

The speaker says he needs 'an intervention.' The president says 'she's lost it.'

By QUINT FORGEY and DANIEL LIPPMAN

05/23/2019 04:47 PM EDT



Washington’s political chaos descended into farce on Thursday when the speaker of the House and the president of the United States accused one another of being mentally unwell.

Hijacking an afternoon White House event with American farmers and agriculture industry leaders, President Donald Trump began calling on his top aides to state for the public record that he was “calm” during a disastrous meeting with Democratic leaders the day before.



“I've been watching her. I have been watching her for a long period of time. She's not the same person. She's lost it,” Trump said of Speaker Nancy Pelosi, just moments after he announced $16 billion in federal aid to growers hammered by the U.S.-China trade conflict.

In a remarkable scene, the president proceeded to name-check senior White House staff and advisers in the Roosevelt Room whom he said had attended Wednesday’s session on infrastructure initiatives with top congressional Democrats — which Trump abandoned after declaring that the lawmakers could not simultaneously negotiate legislation while investigating and threatening to impeach him.

“Kellyanne, what was my temperament yesterday?” Trump asked White House counselor Kellyanne Conway.

“Very calm. No tamper tantrum,” she replied before criticizing journalists’ coverage of the meeting, which Trump has complained portrayed him with a "rage narrative."

“The whole Democrat Party is very messed up. They have never recovered from the great election of 2016 — an election that I think you folks liked very much, right?” Trump said, addressing the farmers flanking his lectern. “Well, Nancy Pelosi was not happy about it, and she is a mess.”

Not even the leaders' families were spared from the sniping and accusations of poor physical well-being. Christine Pelosi, the speaker's daughter, sought to defend her mother on Twitter earlier Thursday, commenting on a Washington Post reportdetailing how a conservative Facebook page had posted a doctored video of the California Democrat in which she appears to drunkenly slur her words.

"Republicans and their conservative allies have been pumping this despicable fake meme for years! Now they are caught," Christine Pelosi wrote online. "#FactCheck: Madam Speaker doesn’t even drink alcohol!"

Pelosi herself on Thursday invoked the president's wife and children in appearing to question Trump's fitness for office, telling reporters in the Capitol: “I wish that his family or his administration or his staff would have an intervention for the good of the country.”


At that same news conference, the speaker questioned whether Trump was truly in charge of his White House and seemed to jokingly reference the Constitution's 25th Amendment, which allows the Cabinet to remove a president from office if he can't perform his duties.

It was a reporter's question at the White House about Pelosi's "intervention" remark — which Trump dubbed "a nasty-type statement" — that put the president on the defensive Thursday. He began turning to aides such as Mercedes Schlapp, the White House director of strategic communications, and pressing them for first-hand accounts of his scuttled meeting with Democrats.

“You were very calm and you were very direct, and you sent a very firm message to the speaker and to the Democrats,” Schlapp said.

Next up was Trump’s top economic adviser, Larry Kudlow, who said the president’s conversation with Democrats was “much calmer than some of our trade meetings,” followed by White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, who described the president’s demeanor as “very calm and straightforward and clear.”

But the greatest praise for the commander in chief came from Trump himself, who told the assembled members of the media during one non-sequitur: “I'm an extremely stable genius. OK?”

Minutes after the event concluded, Pelosi had already fired back a retort from the speaker's official Twitter account.

"When the 'extremely stable genius' starts acting more presidential," she wrote online, "I’ll be happy to work with him on infrastructure, trade and other issues."

The bizarre exchange of insults between the two ends of Pennsylvania Avenue comes amid growing pressure on Speaker Pelosi to pursue an impeachment inquiry into the president's conduct.


At a closed-door meeting Thursday morning with her Democratic colleagues, Pelosi claimed that Trump "wants to be impeached" by the House so that he can notch a victory during a trial in the Senate, which is controlled by a healthy Republican majority.

Close associates and Republicans close to the president, interviewed in recent weeks, dispute the idea that Trump welcomes impeachment. But with impeachment talk increasingly in the air in Washington and Trump seeming to goad Democrats into moving in that direction, the president may be taking the threat more seriously now.

“In the past he’s always pooh-poohed the idea of impeachment and he always thought that they’re not really serious about it,” said a Republican close to the White House who has discussed the issue with Trump. “That this is sort of a game that they’re putting out there. Even the media, his view was, ‘They need me, I’m the biggest star they ever had and I’m helping the New York Times, MSNBC and CNN.’”

A former senior White House official said Trump doesn’t want to get impeached “in his heart of hearts,” but “the specter of [impeachment] creates that production value that’s so important to him.”

Drag-out fights with Democrats “creates the diametric choice between us and them,” the former official added. “That’s why he does those rallies. It is what motivates his base, it’s what motivates him and he’s 'producing' the presidency.”

Trump also sees impeachment as a political wedge he can wield against Pelosi's newly expanded caucus, this person said: "He thinks that this is just going to rip the Democrats apart because some want to [impeach] and some don’t."



© 2019 POLITICO LLC
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Re: Trump enters the A RIVAL MONSTER JURISPRUDENCE Trump’s J

Postby Meno_ » Mon May 27, 2019 5:16 pm

A RIVAL MONSTER
JURISPRUDENCE
Trump’s Judge Whisperer Promised to Take Our Laws Back to the 1930s
By JAMAL GREENE

MAY 27, 20198:30 AM
Leonard Leo.
Federalist Society Executive Vice President Leonard Leo speaks to media at Trump Tower on Nov. 16, 2016.
Carolyn Kaster/AP
One week before the 1980 presidential election, toward the end of his lone debate against Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan stared into the camera and implored Americans to ask themselves, “Are you better off than you were four years ago?” The question is widely believed to have ended Carter’s presidency.

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Last week, the Washington Post published a profile of Federalist Society Executive Vice President Leonard Leo, focusing in part on a speech he gave to the Council for National Policy in which he warmly predicted the Supreme Court would soon return to the pre–New Deal era of “limited, constitutional government.” Leo believes, in other words, that the court’s view of the Constitution was better off 85 years ago than it is today.

“I think we stand at the threshold of an exciting moment in our republic,” Leo told the council at a closed-door meeting in February, audio of which was obtained by the Post. “This is really, I think, at least in recent memory, a newfound embrace of limited constitutional government in our country. I don’t think this has really happened since probably before the New Deal.”


The average American doesn’t know who Leo is, but as the Post piece makes clear, he‘s one of the most influential lawyers in the country. A longtime leader within the Federalist Society, Leo has had Donald Trump’s ear on judicial appointments and has been the main curator of the president’s list of Supreme Court candidates. Two of Leo’s personal picks, Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch, have been elevated to the highest court in the country since Trump’s election. So when Leonard Leo says he wants to return to a pre–New Deal Constitution, you should listen. And you should be alarmed.

As Leo knows, constitutional law was very different in the 1930s from what it is today. And in a word, it sucked.

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In the 1930s, the courts were fully complicit in maintaining the country as a thoroughgoing ethnocracy, governed openly for the benefit of white men. Public schools in 21 states were racially segregated by law. “Separate but equal” schools had been affirmed by the Supreme Court as late as 1927, in a unanimous decision allowing Mississippi to kick a Chinese American girl out of her local “white” school for being a member of the “yellow” race. The outlawing of segregation is settled law in our country, and nobody would dare dream of returning to those antiquated judicial interpretations, you might say? Several of Trump’s judicial nominees have conspicuously, outrageously, refused to say whether they thought Brown v. Board of Education, which ended legal school segregation in 1954, was correctly decided.

In the 1930s, through a combination of discriminatory literacy tests, poll taxes, “good character” requirements, and straight-up violence, less than 1 percent of black people in the Deep South—where they represented more than a third of the population—were registered to vote. The Supreme Court had blessed these intimidation practices for decades, ever since a 1903 decision in which the court said it couldn’t do anything about Alabama’s self-described effort “to establish white supremacy in this state” by refusing to register black voters. Discriminatory voting practices of this sort weren’t banned until the 1965 Voting Rights Act, the most significant provision of which was gutted six years ago in an opinion by Chief Justice John Roberts (whom Leo also helped elevate to the court).

In the 1930s, women had no constitutional right to equality. They could legally be kept off of juries, given different work hours, paid less money, and imprisoned for using birth control. It would be another four decades before the Supreme Court struck down even a single law for discriminating against women. Kavanaugh and Gorsuch—again, both products of Leo’s vetting—recently dissented from the court’s temporary blocking of a Louisiana law that would have left the entire state with just a single doctor able to perform abortions.

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In the first half of the 20th century, the police could beat confessions out of arrestees. Poor defendants had no right to a lawyer. Evidence could be illegally seized and used in prosecutions. In 1944, for example, South Carolina executed a 14-year-old black boy named George Stinney for the murders of two white girls. He was questioned alone, without his parents or a lawyer present, and convicted by an all-white jury after a two-hour trial and 10 minutes of deliberation. He wasn’t allowed to appeal. He had to sit on books to fit into the headpiece of the electric chair. Only in 2014, 70 years too late, did a circuit court judge vacate the 14-year-old Stinney’s murder conviction. The Stinney case tells you all you need to know about criminal justice in the age Leo wants to bring back.

The 1930s was of course the decade of the Great Depression, when unemployment hit 25 percent and most Americans lived in poverty. The post–New Deal court decisions Leo wishes to repudiate are the ones that gave the government the power to enact minimum wage laws, to create unemployment insurance and Social Security, to provide health insurance to the aged and destitute, and to give workers collective bargaining rights. In the 1930s, those too old to work and too poor not to could often expect a quick but painful death. This is the human toll of “limited government.”

If we’re looking for Reagan’s shining city upon a hill, we won’t find it in America’s now-distant past. Not most of us, anyway. And if it’s what Leo is promising us, we can only hope it’s not in America’s future.


Brett Kavanaugh Donald Trump History John Roberts Judiciary Law Neil Gorsuch Supreme Court
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Below the level of rationality , there exists the primal question, -what shadows follow is from the choice between the evil genius , or the managed one?

Can this, does this question signal some kind of doubly vested metaphor in the new schemal working of things, of deciding what route best describes
venturing into the proper road to peace, rather than war?

For the former describes a split between good and evil, while the later above it and beyond.


And now:




TheHill

CAMPAIGN
May 27, 2019 - 01:57 PM EDT
3 modelers predict Trump reelection: report



BY ZACK BUDRYK
TWEET SHARE EMAIL


Three modelers are predicting President Trump will win reelection in 2020 based on a combination of economic data and incumbent advantages, according to a column in The New York Times.

Steven Rattner wrote that Ray Fair of Yale favors Trump to win based on a model that combines incumbency and gross domestic product growth rates.

The model predicted Barack Obama's 2008 popular vote margin within a fraction of a percentage point and got within two-tenths of a point for his 2012 vote share, Rattner, who served as a counselor to the Treasury secretary during the Obama administration, added.

The model correctly predicting an electoral victory for Trump in 2016, but overestimated his popular vote share by about 5.5 points, which Rattner attributed to Trump's personal unfavorables.



"In other words, a more 'normal' Republican would likely have won the popular vote by a substantial margin (instead of losing it by three million votes)," Rattner wrote.

Trump's status as the incumbent also puts the odds in his favor for 2020, according to the Obama-era official.

Mark Zandi, Moody's Analytics's chief economist, has also said Trump is poised to win based on an analysis of 12 models, while Donald Luskin of Trend Macrolytics made a similar prediction based on an Electoral College analysis, Rattner noted.


"So the question for 2020 may well be whether Mr. Trump can overcome the majority of voters' poor perception of him and use a good economy and incumbency to win re-election," he writes.

The Hill 1625 K Street, NW Suite 900 Washington DC 20006 | 202-628-8500 tel | 202-628-8503 fax

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International :



Unfit To Lead

Why Did UK Parliament Bar Trump Addressing Them?

By

 johnnyfreedom / Daily Kos (05/27/2019)

-



On the Quora UK website, Nate White–an articulate & witty writer–proffered this written response a couple months ago to the query “Why do some British people not like Donald Trump?”  There’s a link to the website at the end of his response.

“A few things spring to mind.

Trump lacks certain qualities which the British traditionally esteem.

For instance, he has no class, no charm, no coolness, no credibility, no compassion, no wit, no warmth, no wisdom, no subtlety, no sensitivity, no self-awareness, no humility, no honour and no grace – all qualities, funnily enough, with which his predecessor Mr. Obama was generously blessed.

So for us, the stark contrast does rather throw Trump’s limitations into embarrassingly sharp relief.

Plus, we like a laugh. And while Trump may be laughable, he has never once said anything wry, witty or even faintly amusing – not once, ever.

I don’t say that rhetorically, I mean it quite literally: not once, not ever. And that fact is particularly disturbing to the British sensibility – for us, to lack humour is almost inhuman.

But with Trump, it’s a fact. He doesn’t even seem to understand what a joke is – his idea of a joke is a crass comment, an illiterate insult, a casual act of cruelty.

Trump is a troll. And like all trolls, he is never funny and he never laughs; he only crows or jeers.

And scarily, he doesn’t just talk in crude, witless insults – he actually thinks in them. His mind is a simple bot-like algorithm of petty prejudices and knee-jerk nastiness.

There is never any under-layer of irony, complexity, nuance or depth. It’s all surface.

Some Americans might see this as refreshingly upfront.

Well, we don’t. We see it as having no inner world, no soul.

And in Britain we traditionally side with David, not Goliath. All our heroes are plucky underdogs: Robin Hood, Dick Whittington, Oliver Twist.

Trump is neither plucky, nor an underdog. He is the exact opposite of that.

He’s not even a spoiled rich-boy, or a greedy fat-cat.

He’s more a fat white slug. A Jabba the Hutt of privilege.

And worse, he is that most unforgivable of all things to the British: a bully.

That is, except when he is among bullies; then he suddenly transforms into a sniveling sidekick instead.

There are unspoken rules to this stuff – the Queensberry rules of basic decency – and he breaks them all. He punches downwards – which a gentleman should, would, could never do – and every blow he aims is below the belt. He particularly likes to kick the vulnerable or voiceless – and he kicks them when they are down.

So the fact that a significant minority – perhaps a third – of Americans look at what he does, listen to what he says, and then think ‘Yeah, he seems like my kind of guy’ is a matter of some confusion and no little distress to British people, given that:
* Americans are supposed to be nicer than us, and mostly are.
* You don’t need a particularly keen eye for detail to spot a few flaws in the man.

This last point is what especially confuses and dismays British people, and many other people too; his faults seem pretty bloody hard to miss.

After all, it’s impossible to read a single tweet, or hear him speak a sentence or two, without staring deep into the abyss. He turns being artless into an art form; he is a Picasso of pettiness; a Shakespeare of shit. His faults are fractal: even his flaws have flaws, and so on ad infinitum.

God knows there have always been stupid people in the world, and plenty of nasty people too. But rarely has stupidity been so nasty, or nastiness so stupid.

He makes Nixon look trustworthy and George W look smart.

In fact, if Frankenstein decided to make a monster assembled entirely from human flaws – he would make a Trump.

And a remorseful Doctor Frankenstein would clutch out big clumpfuls of hair and scream in anguish:

‘My God… what… have… I… created?

If being a twat was a TV show, Trump would be the boxed set.”





























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Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Mon May 27, 2019 8:50 pm

The. Problem with the Trump's transcendentalism is that it is predicated on objective criteria which he lacks.
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Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Tue May 28, 2019 7:51 pm

The wall! Again!


BBC News

Trump supporters build US-Mexico barrier
The private group says it has begun construction on a US-Mexico border wall in New Mexico
A group of Trump supporters has begun building the first privately constructed US-Mexico border wall after a crowd-funding campaign.

US military veteran Brian Kolfage posted a picture of the steel fence going up in the state of New Mexico.

He said it was being erected with more than $22m (£17m) in donations he raised through an online campaign last year.

The fundraiser was launched as Congress refused President Donald Trump funding for his signature campaign promise.


Presentational white space
Mr Kolfage, an Air Force veteran, triple amputee and Purple Heart recipient, tweeted a series of videos and images showing the new barrier on Sunday.

"WE MADE HISTORY! The first crowdsource funded international border wall!" Mr Kolfage wrote on Twitter.

The barrier is being built through his nonprofit organisation WeBuildtheWall Inc, which he set up after organising a GoFundMe campaign in December entitled We The People Will Fund The Wall.

Former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon is chairman of WeBuildtheWall's advisory board.

Trump's border wall - in seven charts
Six things that could topple Donald Trump's border wall
Mr Bannon told CNN the new private barrier would link two 21-mile sections of existing fencing.


Kris Kobach, a former Kansas secretary of state who is now general counsel for WeBuildtheWall, told CNN the privately built section would cost up to $8m.

The group has hired Fisher Industries, a North Dakota-based contractor that Mr Trump had argued should be appointed to build the wall, according to the Washington Post.

Trump supporter Jeff Allen, 56, said the barrier is being built on land he co-owns in the city of Sunland Park, New Mexico, across the border from Ciudad Juarez, Mexico.

He said the section, about half a mile long, would be finished by the end of the week.

Former Kansas secretary of state Kris Kobach (left) giving tour of construction site
Image caption Founder Brian Kolfage tweeted a picture of former Kansas secretary of state Kris Kobach (left) giving tours of the construction site
Mr Allen told AFP news agency: "This is Americans' way of saying, 'Congress, you're worthless, and we're fighting it. We're going to build [the wall] ourselves.'

"This is not Europe. This is America. We protect our borders."

He denied hating immigrants, saying he is married to a Mexican woman, and his daughter was born in Ciudad Juarez.

"This is not about racism," Mr Allen told AFP. "This is about me protecting myself, and America having a secure border.

"If people want to immigrate, they should go to a port of entry and apply."


WeBuildtheWall said it was just the beginning of its mission to secure the US southern border.

"Buckle up, we're just getting started!" the group wrote on Facebook.

US judge blocks funds for Trump border wall plan
Trump escalates migrant wall stand-off
US Customs and Border Protection told the BBC: "This project is not connected to our efforts.

"Please reach out to the company leading construction for any information related to their endeavour."

Last week a court blocked a plan by the Trump administration to channel defence department funds to build a border wall.

A federal judge granted the injunction against the use of $1bn in Arizona and Texas because it had not been approved by Congress.



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Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Tue May 28, 2019 7:57 pm

Meno_ wrote:The wall! Again!


BBC News




Fox News


RUSSIA INVESTIGATIONPublished May 29, 2019 Last Update 26 minutes ago
Dems ramp up calls for Trump impeachment after Mueller speaks out on Russia probe
By Ronn Blitzer | Fox News



Prominent Democrats are ramping up calls to impeach President Trump in the aftermath of Special Counsel Robert Mueller's statement on Wednesday recapping his investigation's findings and emphasizing his report did not exonerate the president of obstruction of justice.

SPECIAL COUNSEL ROBERT MUELLER BREAKS SILENCE ON RUSSIA PROVE, SAYS CHARGING TRUMP WITH A CRIME WAS 'NOT AN OPTION'

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., whose committee would play a starring role in any impeachment effort, said during a New York City press conference on Wednesday afternoon, “With respect to [the] impeachment question, at this point all options are on the table and nothing should be ruled out.”

Mueller's statement triggered an avalanche of calls from 2020 Democratic presidential hopefuls, and puts pressure on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who has resisted calls so far from Democrats to pursue impeachment. During an event in California on Wednesday, Pelosi was non-commital but said, "Many constituents want to impeach the president. But we want to do what is right and what gets results."

Others, though, want to move ahead with impeachment now: Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., tweeted that there is a "legal and moral obligation to begin impeachment proceedings immediately."

Continue Reading Below

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., described Mueller's statement as "an impeachment referral," and said that Congress should act on it.

Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., also compared Mueller's remarks to an "impeachment referall," and said, "We need to start impeachment proceedings. It's our constitutional obligation."

Beto O'Rourke also weighed in, calling for "consequences, accountability, and justice," and saying impeachment was "the only way to ensure that."

Rep. Seth Moulton, D-Mass., who is also running for president, said now that Mueller's job is done, "Impeachment hearings should begin tomorrow."

On the topic of obstruction of justice, Mueller stated that it would be unconstitutional to charge a sitting president with a crime, and he would not accuse someone of a crime without them being able to defend themselves in a court proceeding. At the same time, he said he was unable to exonerate the president either. This has added fuel to Democrats' desire to impeach Trump.

In an earlier statement, Nadler, the top Democrat on the committee, vowed that Congress would "respond."

"Given that Special Counsel Mueller was unable to pursue criminal charges against the President, it falls to Congress to respond to the crimes, lies and other wrongdoing of President Trump – and we will do so," Nadler said in a statement. "No one, not even the President of the United States, is above the law."

Nadler's statement specifically addressed obstruction of justice, saying that "the Constitution points to Congress to take action to hold the President accountable." Pelosi, in a statement, did not explicitly mention impeachment, but said, "The Congress holds sacred its constitutional responsibility to investigate and hold the President accountable for his abuse of power."

Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., the ranking member of the House Judiciary Committee, issued a statement with a very different conclusion than Nadler.

"Special Counsel Mueller confirmed today what we knew months ago when his report was released: there was no collusion and no obstruction," Collins said in a statement. "Relitigating the 2016 election and reinvestigating the special counsel's findings will only further divide our country."

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders also issued a statement, emphatically stating that it was time to move on from the investigation after Mueller's report did not find evidence of collusion with Russia, and the Justice Department determined there was insufficient evidence of obstruction.

"The report was clear---there was no collusion, no conspiracy---and the Department of Justice confirmed there was no obstruction," Sanders said. Special Counsel Mueller also sstated that Attorney General Barr acted in good faith in his handling of the report. After two years, the Special Counsel is moving on with his life, and everyone else should do the same."

GARY MELTZ: MUELLER SPEAKS -- IS IMPEACHMENT INEVITABLE? HERE'S HOW PELOSI CAN GET PROGRESSIVES TO BACK DOWN

Trump's 2020 campaign also addressed Mueller's statement.

"Special Counsel Robert Mueller's remarks today confirmed what we already knew. There was no collusin between the Russians and the Trump campaign, and there was no case for obstruction," campaign manager Brad Parscale said in a statement. " President Trump has been fully and completely exonerated. Mueller said his investigation is over. The case is now closed."

Parscale went on to address the investigation of "the origins of the Russia hoax," and why the Justice Department and FBI intiated their probe of the Trump campaign.

"Anyone who is for transparency, constitutional civil libterties, and the rule of law should want to know why human sources, wiretapping, and unmasking were used to infiltrate a presidential campaign," he said.


©2019 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.rump supporters build US-Mexico barrier
The private group says it has begun construction on a US-Mexico border wall in New Mexico
A group of Trump supporters has begun building the first privately constructed US-Mexico border wall after a crowd-funding campaign.

US military veteran Brian Kolfage posted a picture of the steel fence going up in the state of New Mexico.

He said it was being erected with more than $22m (£17m) in donations he raised through an online campaign last year.

The fundraiser was launched as Congress refused President Donald Trump funding for his signature campaign promise.


Presentational white space
Mr Kolfage, an Air Force veteran, triple amputee and Purple Heart recipient, tweeted a series of videos and images showing the new barrier on Sunday.

"WE MADE HISTORY! The first crowdsource funded international border wall!" Mr Kolfage wrote on Twitter.

The barrier is being built through his nonprofit organisation WeBuildtheWall Inc, which he set up after organising a GoFundMe campaign in December entitled We The People Will Fund The Wall.

Former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon is chairman of WeBuildtheWall's advisory board.

Trump's border wall - in seven charts
Six things that could topple Donald Trump's border wall
Mr Bannon told CNN the new private barrier would link two 21-mile sections of existing fencing.


Kris Kobach, a former Kansas secretary of state who is now general counsel for WeBuildtheWall, told CNN the privately built section would cost up to $8m.

The group has hired Fisher Industries, a North Dakota-based contractor that Mr Trump had argued should be appointed to build the wall, according to the Washington Post.

Trump supporter Jeff Allen, 56, said the barrier is being built on land he co-owns in the city of Sunland Park, New Mexico, across the border from Ciudad Juarez, Mexico.

He said the section, about half a mile long, would be finished by the end of the week.

Former Kansas secretary of state Kris Kobach (left) giving tour of construction site
Image caption Founder Brian Kolfage tweeted a picture of former Kansas secretary of state Kris Kobach (left) giving tours of the construction site
Mr Allen told AFP news agency: "This is Americans' way of saying, 'Congress, you're worthless, and we're fighting it. We're going to build [the wall] ourselves.'

"This is not Europe. This is America. We protect our borders."

He denied hating immigrants, saying he is married to a Mexican woman, and his daughter was born in Ciudad Juarez.

"This is not about racism," Mr Allen told AFP. "This is about me protecting myself, and America having a secure border.

"If people want to immigrate, they should go to a port of entry and apply."


WeBuildtheWall said it was just the beginning of its mission to secure the US southern border.

"Buckle up, we're just getting started!" the group wrote on Facebook.

US judge blocks funds for Trump border wall plan
Trump escalates migrant wall stand-off
US Customs and Border Protection told the BBC: "This project is not connected to our efforts.

"Please reach out to the company leading construction for any information related to their endeavour."

Last week a court blocked a plan by the Trump administration to channel defence department funds to build a border wall.

A federal judge granted the injunction against the use of $1bn in Arizona and Texas because it had not been approved by Congress.



Copyright © 2019 BBC. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.



https://youtu.be/YR5ApYxkU-U

Fox News


RUSSIA INVESTIGATIONPublished May 29, 2019 Last Update 26 minutes ago
Dems ramp up calls for Trump impeachment after Mueller speaks out on Russia probe
By Ronn Blitzer | Fox News




Prominent Democrats are ramping up calls to impeach President Trump in the aftermath of Special Counsel Robert Mueller's statement on Wednesday recapping his investigation's findings and emphasizing his report did not exonerate the president of obstruction of justice.

SPECIAL COUNSEL ROBERT MUELLER BREAKS SILENCE ON RUSSIA PROVE, SAYS CHARGING TRUMP WITH A CRIME WAS 'NOT AN OPTION'

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., whose committee would play a starring role in any impeachment effort, said during a New York City press conference on Wednesday afternoon, “With respect to [the] impeachment question, at this point all options are on the table and nothing should be ruled out.”

Mueller's statement triggered an avalanche of calls from 2020 Democratic presidential hopefuls, and puts pressure on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who has resisted calls so far from Democrats to pursue impeachment. During an event in California on Wednesday, Pelosi was non-commital but said, "Many constituents want to impeach the president. But we want to do what is right and what gets results."

Others, though, want to move ahead with impeachment now: Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., tweeted that there is a "legal and moral obligation to begin impeachment proceedings immediately."

Continue Reading Below

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., described Mueller's statement as "an impeachment referral," and said that Congress should act on it.

Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., also compared Mueller's remarks to an "impeachment referall," and said, "We need to start impeachment proceedings. It's our constitutional obligation."

Beto O'Rourke also weighed in, calling for "consequences, accountability, and justice," and saying impeachment was "the only way to ensure that."

Rep. Seth Moulton, D-Mass., who is also running for president, said now that Mueller's job is done, "Impeachment hearings should begin tomorrow."

On the topic of obstruction of justice, Mueller stated that it would be unconstitutional to charge a sitting president with a crime, and he would not accuse someone of a crime without them being able to defend themselves in a court proceeding. At the same time, he said he was unable to exonerate the president either. This has added fuel to Democrats' desire to impeach Trump.

In an earlier statement, Nadler, the top Democrat on the committee, vowed that Congress would "respond."

"Given that Special Counsel Mueller was unable to pursue criminal charges against the President, it falls to Congress to respond to the crimes, lies and other wrongdoing of President Trump – and we will do so," Nadler said in a statement. "No one, not even the President of the United States, is above the law."

Nadler's statement specifically addressed obstruction of justice, saying that "the Constitution points to Congress to take action to hold the President accountable." Pelosi, in a statement, did not explicitly mention impeachment, but said, "The Congress holds sacred its constitutional responsibility to investigate and hold the President accountable for his abuse of power."

Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., the ranking member of the House Judiciary Committee, issued a statement with a very different conclusion than Nadler.

"Special Counsel Mueller confirmed today what we knew months ago when his report was released: there was no collusion and no obstruction," Collins said in a statement. "Relitigating the 2016 election and reinvestigating the special counsel's findings will only further divide our country."

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders also issued a statement, emphatically stating that it was time to move on from the investigation after Mueller's report did not find evidence of collusion with Russia, and the Justice Department determined there was insufficient evidence of obstruction.

"The report was clear---there was no collusion, no conspiracy---and the Department of Justice confirmed there was no obstruction," Sanders said. Special Counsel Mueller also sstated that Attorney General Barr acted in good faith in his handling of the report. After two years, the Special Counsel is moving on with his life, and everyone else should do the same."

GARY MELTZ: MUELLER SPEAKS -- IS IMPEACHMENT INEVITABLE? HERE'S HOW PELOSI CAN GET PROGRESSIVES TO BACK DOWN

Trump's 2020 campaign also addressed Mueller's statement.

"Special Counsel Robert Mueller's remarks today confirmed what we already knew. There was no collusin between the Russians and the Trump campaign, and there was no case for obstruction," campaign manager Brad Parscale said in a statement. " President Trump has been fully and completely exonerated. Mueller said his investigation is over. The case is now closed."

Parscale went on to address the investigation of "the origins of the Russia hoax," and why the Justice Department and FBI intiated their probe of the Trump campaign.

"Anyone who is for transparency, constitutional civil libterties, and the rule of law should want to know why human sources, wiretapping, and unmasking were used to infiltrate a presidential campaign," he said.


Fox News
This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. ©2019 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.

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POLITICS
White House Wanted USS John McCain ‘Out of Sight’ During Trump Japan Visit
U.S. military officials worked to ensure President Trump would not see the warship that bears the name of the late senator, a frequent target of the president’s ire
A tarp obscures the name of the USS John S. McCain ahead of President Trump's visit to Japan.
A tarp obscures the name of the USS John S. McCain ahead of President Trump's visit to Japan.



By Rebecca Ballhaus and Gordon Lubold
Updated May 29, 2019 11:00 p.m. ET
The White House wanted the U.S. Navy to move “out of sight” the warship USS John S. McCain ahead of President Trump’s visit to Japan, according to an email reviewed by The Wall Street Journal.

The ship was named after the father and grandfather of the late senator—a war hero who became a frequent target of Mr. Trump’s ire—and the senator’s name was added to the ship in 2018.





The Wall Street Journal
Copyright ©2019 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved.






???????? ????? ?????????



Professor: Dems need to impeach Trump to win 2020

Professor Allan Lichtman, who correctly predicted the last nine presidential election wins, says Democrats will only have a chance at winning in 2020 if they impeach President Donald Trump.

 

View on CNN



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Now what?





U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin shake hands as they hold a joint news conference after their meeting in Helsinki, Finland, July 16, 2018
U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin shake hands as they hold a joint news conference after their meeting in Helsinki, Finland, July 16, 2018REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger/File Photo
Trump Attacks Mueller Probe - Inadvertently Confirms Russia Helped Elect Him
'And now Russia has disappeared because I had nothing to do with Russia helping me to get elected'

Haaretz

U.S. President Donald Trump tweeted an attack on Special Counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation on Thursday and admitted for the first time that Russia "helped me to get elected" — while denying any involvement. Later in the day, Trump retracted the statement.




Trump tweeted: "Russia, Russia, Russia! That’s all you heard at the beginning of this Witch Hunt Hoax. ... And now Russia has disappeared because I had nothing to do with Russia helping me to get elected. It was a crime that didn’t exist. So now the Dems and their partner, the Fake News Media,....."

He continued in a second tweet: "....say he fought back against this phony crime that didn’t exist, this horrendous false accusation, and he shouldn’t fight back, he should just sit back and take it. Could this be Obstruction? No, Mueller didn’t find Obstruction either. Presidential Harassment!"



Donald J. Trump

@realDonaldTrump
·
Russia, Russia, Russia! That’s all you heard at the beginning of this Witch Hunt Hoax...And now Russia has disappeared because I had nothing to do with Russia helping me to get elected. It was a crime that didn’t exist. So now the Dems and their partner, the Fake News Media,.....


Donald J. Trump

@realDonaldTrump
....say he fought back against this phony crime that didn’t exist, this horrendous false accusation, and he shouldn’t fight back, he should just sit back and take it. Could this be Obstruction? No, Mueller didn’t find Obstruction either. Presidential Harassment

Trump deletes tweet finally admitting Russia helped elect him
Trump deletes tweet finally admitting Russia helped elect him Screen shot / Twitter
Read more: Fox News senior analyst: Mueller said he would indict Trump if he weren't president | Even Netanyahu knows it’s over: Analysis


Trump has long contended that his 2016 presidential victory, which he often refers to as one of the greatest of all time, was in no way aided by the Russians. Trump on multiple occasions has falsely claimed that his 306-point electoral college win was the biggest since Ronald Reagan, despite former President Obama winning with 332 points in 2012.



White House adviser Kellyanne Conway regularly uses a talking point that the allegation that Russia helped Trump win is an insult. “The idea that any of us, and me as a campaign manager, would cheat, steal, lie, cut corners, talk to Russians, was an insult from the beginning,” Conway said last month while talking to reporters.


Fox News Senior Analyst: Mueller Said He Would Indict Trump if He Weren't President

Trump told reporters Thursday as he departed the White House, "Russia didn't help me at all." He said Russia would have preferred that Hillary Clinton be elected, not him.


Read more: 'Flurry of lies:' CNN banner blasts Trump's statements on Mueller probe

Trump claimed, "Nobody has been tougher" on Russia "than me."


Mueller said that charging Trump with a crime was "not an option" because of federal rules, but he used his first public remarks on the Russia investigation to emphasize that he did not exonerate the president.


"If we had had confidence that the president clearly did not commit a crime, we would have said so," Mueller declared on Wednesday.


Trump unleashes fury on Mueller
The special counsel's remarks stood as a pointed rebuttal to Trump's repeated claims that he was cleared and that the two-year inquiry was merely a "witch hunt." They also marked a counter to criticism, including by Attorney General William Barr, that Mueller should have reached a determination on whether the president illegally tried to obstruct the probe by taking actions such as firing his FBI director, James Comey.

Mueller made clear that his team never considered indicting Trump because the Justice Department prohibits the prosecution of a sitting president.

"Charging the president with a crime was therefore not an option we could consider," Mueller said during a televised statement.

He said he believed such an action would be unconstitutional.

Mueller did not use the word "impeachment," but said it was the job of Congress, not the criminal justice system, to hold the president accountable for any wrongdoing.

The Associated Press contributed to this report









In unprecedented circumstances, the unprecedented things, like indicting a sitting president, SHOULD BE DONE!
Vel Santic Chayon-Laufer 15:36 30.05.2019
@Vel Santic Chayon-Laufer@ It is because you do not understand the law. There was no underlying crime established, no collusion. On the obstruction side, there was insufficient evidence to proceed . Whatever evidence of obstruction was found would not be sufficient to win a case in a court of law. Trump skirted the borderline of obstruction, that much is clear but the criminality was never established. Thus cannot indict. It is exactly with the principals of Common


© Haaretz Daily Newspaper Ltd.
All Rights Reserved
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Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Sun Aug 04, 2019 12:58 am

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Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Sun Aug 11, 2019 1:38 am

Brian Epstein committed suicide today.

Here is his connection to President Trump:


In 2002, in a profile about Epstein in New York Magazine, Trump was quoted as saying, “I’ve known Jeff for fifteen years. Terrific guy. He’s a lot of fun to be with. It is even said that he likes beautiful women as much as I do, and many of them are on the younger side. No doubt about it – Jeffrey enjoys his social life.”


----- --- --------------'------


Trump again boosts a baseless conspiracy theory, this one about Jeffrey Epstein
Trump contradicted his own officials, retweeting a right-wing conspiracy about Epstein.

By Riley Beggin on August 11, 2019 10:20 am


Christopher Furlong/Getty Images
President Donald Trump retweeted a popular conspiracy theory about financier and convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein’s death by suicide, elevating unsubstantiated claims that Epstein, who died in federal custody, was killed by Bill Clinton.


Epstein was found dead in his jail cell in Manhattan Saturday morning while he was awaiting trial for sex trafficking. He was accused of sex crimes against dozens of young girls, who he allegedly raped and molested over years at his luxury properties across the country.

The Bureau of Prisons — a law enforcement arm of Trump’s own Department of Justice, which was holding Epstein — said in a statement he had died by apparent suicide.

But rather than tweet a statement confirming his DOJ’s findings, Trump promoted a theory countering his administration’s statement by retweeting a video by a conservative personality who simultaneously pushed back against the conspiracy theory that Trump — who was at one time an associate of Epstein’s — killed the financier while pushing the conspiracy theory that Bill Clinton (who was also an Epstein associate) was responsible for the sex offender’s death.

The conservative personality captioned the tweet “we know who did this” and used the hashtags ClintonBodyCount (a reference to a long-running conspiracy theory that originated in the 1990s which claims Bill and Hillary Clinton secretly kill their enemies) and ClintonCrimeFamily.

Beyond the unsubstantiated claims of Bill Clinton’s involvement in Epstein’s death, the video also contains misinformation; for instance, it says that Epstein died while being monitored on suicide watch. Officials have said Epstein in fact was not on suicide watch when he died.

There is absolutely no evidence to support the idea that Epstein was murdered. But here’s why people are connecting him to Clinton (and to Trump) online, according to reporting by Vox’s Andrew Prokop:

In the years before Epstein’s 2007 guilty plea to solicitation of prostitution with a minor, he was known for “collecting” friendships with many noteworthy or influential people — including Clinton and Trump, who were social acquaintances. Clinton took international trips on Epstein’s plane in the early years of his post-presidency, including a trip to several African countries with Kevin Spacey and Chris Tucker.

Trump, meanwhile, reportedly attended Epstein-hosted events in New York and Florida, as Epstein patronized the Mar-a-Lago Club. In 2002, Trump even gave a remarkable on-the-record comment about Epstein to a New York magazine journalist, calling him “terrific” and adding that he “likes beautiful women as much as I do, and many of them are on the younger side.”

Epstein’s relationship with Clinton led to the revival of the Clinton Body Count conspiracy theory following his death. Vox’s Dylan Matthews traced the meme to its origins:

According to a history and debunking first published by Snopes in 1998, the body count meme originated in 1993 with Indianapolis lawyer and militia movement activist Linda Thompson, who compiled a list of 34 people connected to the Clintons who had passed away and titled it, “The Clinton Body Count: Coincidence or the Kiss of Death?” William Dannemeyer, a notoriously homophobic then-retired Congressman from Orange County, California, picked up the list, trimmed it to 24, and sent it Congressional leadership in 1994 as he ran for the US Senate.

Thompson provided — by her own admission — “no direct evidence” that the Clintons were responsible for any of the deaths, and Snopes provides a comprehensive account of each death, most of which were easily explained heart attacks, plane crashes, or suicides.

As Matthews writes, the conspiracy theory took off following the death by suicide of an official who was connected to a number of Clinton administration scandals. Many prominent conservatives — including members of Congress — rejected the idea that the official, Vince Foster, had died by suicide, arguing that he had been killed. These arguments further fed the Clinton Body Count conspiracy as did the easily explained deaths of other members of the Clinton administration and Democratic Party officials in the Clinton’s orbit.

After Epstein’s death Saturday morning, the competing #TrumpBodyCount popped up in response to the Clinton theories. Like Clinton, Trump has been linked to Epstein, and he faced an allegation that he’d raped a 13-year-old girl while at one of Epstein’s parties. Right-wing personalities, including Trump’s son, Donald Trump Jr., were quick to use the hashtag’s popularity to promote the claim that Twitter is biased against conservatives, something there is no evidence for.

As is the case with the Clinton Body Count conspiracy theory, there is absolutely no evidence whatsoever to suggest President Trump is was involved in Epstein’s death.

Trump is no stranger to spreading conspiracy theories, especially when they involve his political adversaries. He claimed in 2017 that former President Barack Obama wiretapped Trump Tower. And before that, he spent years promoting the baseless claim that Obama was born in Kenya.

He’s said, without evidence, that a million people voted illegally for Hillary Clinton in 2016 and that Sen. Ted Cruz’s dad was connected to the man who killed former President John F. Kennedy.

It is therefore unsurprising that Trump would boost the conspiracy theory du jour, and given his Department of Justice said Epstein died by suicide, his retweet also follows a pattern of the president promoting ideas that contradict his administration’s experts.

Next Up In Politics & Policy
Where every 2020 candidate stands on guns
Border chief explains why there have been no ICE raids at Trump properties
The conspiracy theories about the Clintons and Jeffrey Epstein’s death, explained
Jeffrey Epstein wasn’t on suicide watch when he died. Officials want to know why.
Jeffrey Epstein dies of suicide while awaiting a new sex trafficking trial
Jeffrey Epstein, the convicted sex offender who was friends with Donald Trump and Bill Clinton, explained


© 2019 Vox Media, Inc. All Rights Reserved
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Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Thu Sep 12, 2019 2:51 pm

Interest rates, Bolton , Supreme court decision :

Trump tweets:

The Federal Reserve should get our interest rates down to ZERO, or less, and we should then start to refinance our debt. INTEREST COST COULD BE BROUGHT WAY DOWN, while at the same time substantially lengthening the term. We have the great currency, power, and balance sheet....


Now doesen't this make sense?
After all China manipulates money to her advantage, and the debt soaring in the trillions, would a move like that cause lack of trust among investors in U.S. bonds, becoming detrimental instead of beneficial?


Bolton:


Is he pressured out, due to Trump's diminishing popularity census?


"Democrats emboldened by President "Trump's sinking poll numbers are playing hardball on spending and guns legislation, arguing they now have new leverage with Republicans and the White House" (New York Times, Sept 12, 2019)

On another front, a Trump win on illegal immigration from Central America:

NBC news :

The U.S. Supreme Court late Wednesday gave the Trump administration permission to enforce its toughest restriction yet on asylum seekers at the southern border, even though a lawsuit to stop the new policy is still working its way through the lower courts.

As a result, the government can now refuse to consider a request for asylum from anyone who failed to apply for it in another country after leaving home but before coming here. The order means, for instance, that migrants from Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador cannot seek asylum in the U.S. if they didn't first ask for it in Mexico.


Conflicting news, while the House is setting groundwork on Articles of Impeachment.
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