philosophy in film

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Thu Mar 14, 2019 7:25 pm

They all say the same thing. If you want to excel as an actor, you must be able to draw on the sort of experiences that make it possible for art to imitate life.

Nothing is off the table here because you never really know what frame of mind or emotion or psychological state you might be called upon to recreate up on the stage.

And, this being the case, there will always be those directing actors who are ready, willing and able to take advantage of it. Thus, "...when the workshop's ambitious director pushes Madeline to weave her rich interior world and troubled history with her mother into their collective art the lines between performance and reality begin to blur."

And this impacts not only Madeline's performance up on the stage but her very "sense of identity" itself. "I" tugged and pulled...and then completely twisted out of shape. And what if, from the very start, the actor is already emotionally disturbed? What might be the end result of that? A sane actor can portray insanity up on the stage with more or less skill. But what are the [possible] consequences of an actor less than completely sane being pushed all the more to go over the edge?

And then the part about encompassing sanity itself. In today's world in particular. One way or another we are often putting on a mask and adopting one or another persona in one or another context. And here you are never really certain if what you are watching is in or out of Madeline's head.

at wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madeline%27s_Madeline
trailer: https://youtu.be/S_ezPTjSSPw

Madeline's Madeline [2018]
Written in part and directed by Josephine Decker

Nurse [from Madeline's dreamscape]: There you go. What you are experiencing is just a metaphor. The emotions you are having are not your own. They are someone else's. You are not the cat. You are inside the cat. Now lie back...

...

Evangeline [workshop director]: Madeline, what are you doing?
Madeline: I was a sea turtle.
Evangeline: You were a sea turtle, and then you were a woman playing a sea turtle. Look at your hands. Hands. Whose hands are those? Are they yours, or are they the turtle's?

...

Madeline: Drive, drive! Duck! Duck! Oh, shit. Oh, shit. Go, Mom!
Regina [Mother]: I'm going, I'm going. I can't duck and drive.
Madeline: Just go! Just go!
Mother: I'm going! Are you okay?
Madeline: Yes! Oh, my God. We just mooned Evangeline.
Mother: You did?
Madeline: Yes. Let's go!
Mother: I thought you...I thought something had really happened.

...

Son: Mom, what would you be if you were someone else?
Mother: Do you mean, like, a famous person?
Madeline: No, he means, um, if you could cut out someone's face and wear it as your own, who would it be?

...

Madeline: I had this dream that I wanted to tell you about, but, you know...
Evangeline: I know. You know what they say about dreaming. You just have to trust yourself. Jung says that...in all chaos there is a cosmos, in all disorder a secret order, that the pendulum of the mind swings between sense and nonsense, not between right and wrong.
Madeline: Dreams are awesome. I dreamt I slammed my mother's hand with an iron. I couldn't breathe. It felt like I was underwater, watching her.
Evangeline: Anything like that, you can always share it with me. I dreamt you were my daughter.
[a pause]
Evangeline: Do you feel safe around your mom...?

...

Boy: Hey, Madeline. What's up? What's in your basement? Yo, me and the guys over there, we took bets, and we think there's five dead bodies in there. Five, for every finger on your hand.
Madeline [bursting into a character]: I killed 'em with my fingernails!
Boy: You're weird.

...

Madeline: I was just showing them the basement.
Mother: Mm-hmm. Why don't you sit down. Let's watch this! Okay. Right? Sit down, Madeline. This what you were doing? This what I interrupted?
Boy: We were just...
Mother: Yeah? Well, just do it. Go ahead. Do it. Whip it out.
Woman from porn video: You're putting it in her asshole!
Mother [to the boys]: This is a good idea? You want her in a psych ward for another six weeks? With her condition?

...

Evangeline: I want to deepen the work that we're doing with the character that you're gonna play. Do you want to name her?
Madeline: Oh, I... I thought of a name. Zia.
Evangeline: Zia? -Yeah. That is... It's really powerful. You know, one of the ways that we could maybe...sort of make Zia more concrete would be...I was thinking we could explore the dream that you were telling me about and maybe act it out. The one that you... With the iron, and you slam your mom's hand. It's so just potent. And I-I can't stop thinking about those images. You know, dream work can be this really... Uh, anyway... we should... try acting it out. How do you feel about that?
Madeline [clearly uneasy]: I, uh...I guess, yeah.

...

Evangeline [disjointedly]: Madeline, was that...Is that about how it felt? What? I think we need to, um, emphasize the fractured, um, disjointed relationship with the mother at the beginning.

...

Mother [on phone?]: Yes, it's an emergency. Her prescription ran out a week ago. Mm-hmm. Why? Because she didn't tell me. I'm sorry. She's a teenager, so...She just doesn't tell me everything in her life.

...

Mother: You know, I just... I want... I want you to be careful. You know? Because... you're not...
Madeline: I'm not what?
Mother: Um... You know. You're not like the other people.
Madeline: Because I'm black?
Mother: No, Madeline. I just feel like you're maybe not ready, you know. Your situation, which is different...
Madeline: What are you saying?
Mother: It's different from the other people in the...Everyone else is...is stable, and, um... You know, if you had an episode, which you probably will, what would happen?
[Madeline throws a cup of soda at her]

...

Evangeline: Are you okay?
Madeline: I'm good.
Evangeline: Yeah? How's things with your mom?
Madeline: On the way here, she tried to give me the sex talk. I'm 16. I know everything.

...

Nurse [actor in a skit]: What seems to be the problem?
Madeline [acting as the patient]: I'm sick.
Nurse: Yeah? What do you have?
Madeline: I'm de...Pregnant.
Evangeline: Hey, Madeline. It's a psychiatric ward, not a pregnancy ward.
Madeline: My mom wants me to have an abortion, but, um, I'm gonna keep the baby.
Nurse: Wh... I mean, do you...Do you think you're... you're ready?
Madeline: I think I'm ready. I... I want to take care of someone. Like she will. But I'm afraid that the birth will be horrible.
Nurse: How will it be horrible?
Madeline: Bloody and hard. What if the baby doesn't wanna come out? What if it's, like... And it dies inside of me.
Evangeline [not sure how to react]: Let's take five minutes, and then we'll, uh, regroup and try some more.

...

Woman: Madeline was telling us your show is about prison?
Evangeline: Uh, no. No, it's not.
Madeline: It's...It's a metaphor.
Woman: Metaphor?
Evangeline: No, it's not a metaphor. It's-It's, um... It's about mental illness. And-And...Wow. Madeline is the lead.


The look on Madeline's face says it all...

Madeline: So, um, how long have you and Evangeline been together?
George: Oh. We've been together five years. Five beautiful years.
Madeline: Wow.
George: Mm-mmm.
Madeline: That's funny, because she has never mentioned you.
George: She hasn't?
Madeline: Nope.

...

Madeline: So, um, it's my birthday this weekend.
George: Are you serious? Well, happy birthday. You're turning...
Madeline: Seventeen.
George: Seventeen.
Madeline: And do you know what I am doing for my birthday? I'm going to lose my virginity. George [taken aback]: That's... That's great. That's great. Who's...Who's the...Um, who's the lucky guy?
Madeline: I haven't decided yet.
George: Okay.
Madeline: You know, if you have any recommendations for, like, a position or anything, for... 'Cause I'm a beginner, you know. I was thinking that I could bend over, and he could squeeze my ass cheeks.

...

Evangeline: Were you drinking at my house, Madeline? Because you're not acting like yourself.
Madeline: You don't know myself. I am being myself.
Evangeline: I do know you. I know you!
Madeline: Are you insecure?
Evangeline: What?
Madeline: Are you... insecure?
Evangeline: I don't know! No. I mean no. I'm so... I'm not insecure. I'm trying to do something that's really hard. And I am, you know, holding down the fort on the whole project, and I'm spearheading this very collaborative vision that is fucking just... kind of fucked. So, yes. I mean yes, I'm insecure, because I don't know if the project's gonna work. I don't even know if my fucking marriage is gonna work. And I don't...
Madeline: Good.
Evangeline: What? What's good?
Madeline: That you admitted it. I'm insecure too. It's why I want you to like me so much.

...

Madeline: I don't think...I don't think I should be in your project anymore.
Evangeline: What?
Madeline: Okay. I feel like, you know, we're...
Evangeline: I think you might be right, Madeline. I think maybe you shouldn't be in the project. And actually, it feels like a huge relief. I mean, I...Of course, I want you to be in it, but...this doesn't feel like it's good for either of us.

...

Madeline [after Evangeline slams on the brakes and stops the car]: What was that? What... Was it a cat?
Evangeline: I don't know. Maybe it was nothing.
Madeline: Should... Should we check on it?
Evangeline: No, it's dead.

...

Madeline [acting out her mother in a skit at the workshop..with her mother in the room]: You really shouldn't use hand sanitizer like that. It dries out your skin. Oh, what sweater should I wear? The one with floral or the one with floral? The mood swings. They can be so bad sometimes. High, low. You never know where you're gonna go. Throwing things, hitting me. But I love you no matter what because you're my daughter. Were you smoking? I can smell it on you! Go take a shower, for Christ's sakes. Do you want some pancakes? Pancakes! I know you hate butter. Yes. Will you eat anything? Anything? See, Damon eats. Damon fucking eats. And he keeps it in. You're not going to rehearsal on Friday if you don't eat these pancakes. When you were a...just a little baby, I stroked your head so soft. I-I...I said to myself... I said, "This baby, she's so perfect. She's gonna be so strong." And look at you now. You are sick! You are so sick that you... No, Madeline. Madeline, no. Madeline, you're scaring me. Damon, tell her to...Put it down! Oh, my God! Oh, my God! My hand! My hand! Wow. Wow. Oh, my God. Oh, my God!!!


Her mother leaves the room.

Evangeline: That was so great. That was so amazing. Wow! Oh, my God. Are you okay?
Madeline: Yes.
Evangeline: You're so good. That was amazing. Did you guys see that? Oh, my God. That was amazing. Wow. Oh! Wow. I, uh... This... This is the play. This is immersive theater. Wow. Okay. Okay. I was thinking we were gonna do something else, but I think that, in light of this powerful new work, we should, uh... Let's everybody pick a piece, just a section of the improv that Madeline just did, and then we will make a dance. Make a dance of it and, um...
Workshop actor: When you talk about this being the play, is this about Madeline?
Evangeline: Well, no, no. I mean, it's about a character that we've been work... you know, creating together called Zia. It's about a character.
Actor: And it's Madeline's story.
Evangeline: No, Zia. Her name is Zia.
Actor: Yeah, Zia. And she's comfortable with that.
[she turns to Madeline]
Actor: You're comfortable with that? With us telling your story?
Actor [to Evangeline]: I mean...So you're going to tell the story of the inside of her brain.
Evangeline: Yes.


Evangeline completely misses the point that her students clearly get: that she is using and exploiting Madeline's very real emotional turmoil. Unless I'm completely missing the point.

Evangeline: Get off me! Madeline? Madeline. Madeline. Great job. You know, you're obviously taking a lot of risks, and I think you're so talented, you know? But if we're gonna collaborate, I think we should talk about a process that's a little more...Listen. This is done. I think this is done now. Okay. Everybody? Everybody, I think this is done now! So thank you very much, everybody! Great job. Hey! Just stop! Stop!
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Sat Mar 23, 2019 11:22 pm

Talk about conflicting goods...

The year is 1993. Your neice is "caught with another girl". So, out of love, out of faith in God, you send her to "gay conversion therapy". A group that promises to "cure" her. After all, the Reverend Rick who helps to run the operation was once cured himself.

The bottom line of course is that being gay is okay. The problem resides entirely with the reactionary religious folks who have yet to grasp that.

And that is certainly one way to look at it. But that's not how everyone does look at it. So, from their perspective, this is a "liberal" propaganda flick that besmirches all that they hold near and dear.

And that is basically how most of us view the world. With or without God there are good behaviors and bad behaviors. And it's up to us to pick sides.

It really comes down then to how ridiculous the reactionaries are scripted to be. In other words, does it really matter how honest and sincere they are about their own beliefs? And many of them really do believe that being gay is a ticket to Hell. So, I'm looking for this in the film. And I think they did a pretty good job in that respect. I take my own political leap to the left on this issue. But I'm not able to embrace it as the objectivists [left or right] are.

And that's the point. It's not as though the religious folks portrayed here are mindless morons. They're not ignorant clodhoppers or monsters. They have simply found an anchor for "I" in the Lord. And then the whole world becomes "do this" and "don't do that".

Inevitably, there are characters here who are considerably more sophisticated about their "treatment" at God's Promise than others. What makes Cameron particularly vulnerable [and believable] is that she is not nearly as cynical as "sinners" like Jane and Adam. At least not at first.

Look for the American Honey.

IMDb

The clips from the Christian exercise video "Blessercize" are real footage of an actual 90's video.

Due to its limited theatrical release and marketing, the film failed to recoup its paltry $900,000 budget. It grossed just $904,703 in 85 theaters in North America.

Won the Grand Jury Prize (Dramatic) at the Sundance Film Festival.



at wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Mised ... Post_(film)
trailer: https://youtu.be/VEdngvMGjg0

The Miseducation of Cameron Post [2018]
Written in part and directed by Desiree Akhavan

Pastor Crawford: Okay. Everybody, eyes up here. It's time to get started. So, I was thinking this morning. I was thinking about what it was like being your age, how I'd come to worship like I was ticking off a to-do list. I didn't get it like I do now, and I thought, "Well, maybe I should tell you guys a secret." Do you know what we're trying to do every Sunday in church as adults? We're trying to undo the things we did when we were your age. Think about it. You're our future, and you are at an age where you are especially vulnerable to evil. Now when I say, "Evil," I mean evil. And you won't see it now. You won't see it tomorrow. But what feels like fun is actually the enemy, and that enemy is closing the noose around your neck. While you experiment and play with that yoke like it's a toy and you think, "Oh, just this once, just... just a little longer," click. It's got you.

...

Reverend Rick [to Cameron]: Don't worry. You'll get decorating privileges soon. You have to earn certain rights at God's Promise. I swear it's not that bad... just decorating and mail. Most disciples get there in a few weeks. It's all spelled out in the contract.

...

Erin: I think if your top priority is to get better, that should also be true of the people you surround yourself with, you know?
Cameron: And you think you're getting...better?
Erin: Of course. I've been brought closer to God, and I can feel Him guiding me.

...

Lydia: I've come to meet our new disciple. Welcome, Cameron. I'm Dr. Lydia Marsh. I'm the director of God's Promise....I know the adjustment can be difficult at first, but I have every faith you'll find yourself at home here soon. In the meantime, please don't hesitate to ask if you need anything.
Cameron: Thank you.
Lydia: You should consider yourself amongst family, Cameron.
Cameron: You can call me "Cam."
Lydia: "Cameron" is already a masculine name. To abbreviate as something even less feminine only exacerbates your gender confusion.
Cameron: Right.

...

Cameron: I've just never thought of homosexuality like this.
Lydia: There's no such thing as homosexuality. There's only the same struggle with sin we all face. Would you let drug addicts throw parades for themselves?
Cameron: No.
Lydia: No, you wouldn't. Sin is sin. Your struggle is with the sin of same-sex attraction. The first step is for you to stop thinking of yourself as a homosexual.
Cameron: But I don't think of myself as a homosexual. I mean, I don't really think of myself as anything.

...

Jane: Just talk about how positive reinforcements for sports messed with your gender identity. They love that shit. And how your parents gave you too much physical affection or not enough physical affection. Either way, that's why you're gay.
Cameron: My parents are dead.
Jane: That should probably go in your iceberg.

...

Cameron: You grew up in a commune?
Jane: Yeah.
Cameron: I didn't know hippies were evangelical.
Jane: They're not. My mom's new husband is.

...

Helen: I will not pray for God to change me because God does not make mistakes, and I am the one who is tempted by sin. Change will come through God...but within me. Me. I must be the change.
Steve: I've always known I didn't want to act on my same-sex attractions, so, in the past, I would resort to...self-pleasure. Then when I learned that that was a sin, also, I stopped, but it's like...shouldn't it be okay if it's instead of acting out?
Dane: What? You can't get a pass from God to jerk off.

...

Cameron: So, this worked for you, then? Like, you changed?
Rick: Yes. I changed.
Cameron: How?
Rick: It was a process. It's funny, actually. The moment things began to turn around was in a bar.
Cameron: Bar?
Rick: Yeah. A gay bar, of all places. Two men from my church came in. They saw my car parked outside, and they knew I'd been struggling, so they came in looking for me. Wow. It was God, Cameron. I asked for His help, and He gave it to me in the form of those allies. I was so deeply unhappy, but I didn't think I was worth saving, and I wonder if you've asked that of yourself. Are you worth saving?

...

Cameron: What's her deal anyway? Like, I know why Rick is here, but why does she give such a shit? She's not, like, ex-gay, is she?
Jane: She's Rick's sister.
Cameron: Seriously?
Jane: Yeah. She degayed him.

...

Lydia: Tell us about that girl you knew from home.
Cameron: Okay. Um...her name was Coley. We were in the same Bible study.
Lydia: What was she like?
Cameron: She was perfect. But she wasn't full of herself. You know, she was the type of person that, no matter who you were, you'd meet her, and you'd... you'd want to be her friend.
Lydia: It's said that cannibals only eat the enemies they admire as a way to take inside their best qualities. When you speak, you reveal a compulsion to take into yourself the qualities you admired in this girl.
Cameron [hesitantly]: I wanted to be like her, and I confused that with being with her? Lydia: Correct.


Slowly she is learning to tell them what they want to hear.

Mark: Can I ask you a personal question?
Cameron: Sure.
Mark: Do you believe in God?
Cameron: Um...I-I guess I don't...I don't really know.
Mark: Yeah. That's okay.
Cameron: I guess every time I pray...I kind of feel like I'm being phony.
Mark: Yeah. I-I think everybody can feel like that sometimes, but I also think that those are moments where it's really important to lean back on your faith and trust that that will take you forward.
Cameron: I don't think I really have any faith. Or at least I don't... really know how to go about getting it. Or if I really want it.

...

Cameron: What's winkte mean?
Adam: Winkte? Why do you ask?
Cameron: Um... I read it... on your iceberg.
Adam: Yeah. It's a... It's a Lakotan word for two-spirit. It's like a... It's like a third gender. Okay, so, I am two-spirit, which, uh, means I was born with a man's soul and a woman's soul, and, uh, literally, "winkte" means "killed by woman," so it's as if the male part of me is being killed by the female part. That make sense?
Jane: He's basically like the Native American David Bowie.
Adam [chuckling]: I'll take it.

...

Cameron: So, why'd your parents send you here?
Jane: His dad got into politics, and then he converted to Christianity.
Adam: Me being like this... fucks his image.

...

Cameron [on phone]: If I told you I was unhappy... and that I wanted to come home... would you let me?
Ruth [her aunt]: Cam, come on. You have to give it a chance. You know I'm doing this because I love you. Don't you want to have a family someday?

...

Erin [after sort of having sex with Cameron]: You can't tell anyone, Cam.
Cameron: I won't.
Erin: I really do want to get past this.

...

Lydia: Mark, why don't you start us off? I know you've had an especially hard week.
Mark: No. I...Every week is especially hard.
Lydia: Is there something...
Mark: Look, if you want me to talk about my father, then I'd prefer if you just ask.
Lydia: Sounds like you want to talk about your father's decision.
Mark: I don't see what there is to talk about. I mean, you've read his letter. "I am denying your request to return home at the end of the semester. You are still very effeminate... and this is a weakness I cannot have in my home."
Lydia: How did that make you feel?
Mark: I'd like to read a passage. It's one of my father's favorites.
Lydia: Please do.
Mark [in an increasingly mocking voice]: "There was given to me a thorn in the flesh...the messenger of Satan to buffet me, lest I should be exalted above measure. And for this thing, I besought the Lord thrice....that it might depart from me. And unto me he said...My grace is sufficient for thee...for my strength is made perfect in weakness. Most gladly, therefore, will I rather...will I rather glory in infirmities, that the power of Christ may rest upon me. Therefore, I-I take...I take pleasure in...in...in infirmities, in...in reproaches, in necessities, in persecutions, in distresses, for Christ's sake, for when I am weak, then am I strong! For when I am weak...then am I strong. When I am weak...then am I strong."

...

Mark [to the group]: I know that some of you are aware that Mark had a little bit of an accident last night. Adam found him in the bathroom, and we rushed him to the hospital. His dad's already flown out. He is stable, and he's going to be okay.
Dane: Fuck this. You guys are talking in circles. If he didn't kill himself, then what did he do?
Lydia: Dane, yelling and swearing won't help you feel better about what happened to Mark.
Dane: See, that's where you're wrong, 'cause it does, actually. It makes me feel a fuck of a lot better.

...

Rick: Last night, Mark used a razor to cut his genitals several times. Then he poured bleach over the wounds. Adam found him.
Cameron: If you were worried about him, why did you leave him alone?
Rick: I don't have a very good answer for you.
Cameron: Is Adam okay?
Rick: I think so, all things considered. It is going to take him some time to process.
Cameron: How the fuck do you process watching your roommate try and cut his dick off? What's he going to do, put it on his iceberg? You people have no idea what you're doing, do you? You're just making it up as you go along.
Rick [weeping]: I don't know how to answer you right now. I...I'm so sorry. I'm so sorry.

...

Cameron: Look, I know you're here because of what happened to Mark.
Government official [sent to investigate Mark's self-mutilation]: Something didn't just happen to him. He injured himself.
Cameron: While under the care of this facility.
Government official: Correct, and that's why I'm here, to investigate the care that is given by those who run this facility, not to investigate the mission of this facility, unless that includes abuse or neglect.
Cameron: Yeah, but what about emotional abuse?
Government official: Are you saying you're being emotionally abused by the staff here?
Cameron: How is programming people to hate themselves not emotional abuse.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Sat Mar 30, 2019 10:48 pm

A theme common to many true-crime docs is the astonishment exhibited by folks who never in a million years could have imagined that their beloved husband or wife or son or daughter or best friend "could do such a horrible thing".

In fact, at the beginning of the program, they will insist they just know that he or she is innocent. Why? Because no one knows them better than they do. It's just not "in them".

But what do we really know about anyone anymore? And what do they really know about us? Most of us don't live in small villages anymore. In the sprawling metropolis that is our postmodern world, you can bet that everyone pretty much does not know the business of everyone else. Even of those closest to them at times.

On the other hand, there is still the myth of the "small town". And, in this particular small town, a "picture perfect" family and the crimes of a decade old serial killer begin to merge. Here, "Tyler Burnside is a Boy Scout, a volunteer at his local church, and the dutiful son of an upstanding, community leader dad."

Then out of the blue one day, Tyler stumbles onto something -- pornographic images -- belonging to his dad. And this sets his whole world to crumbling. His all-American family is about to be ripped to shreds.

So, are there things he doesn't know about his own beloved father?

What is always particularly frightening about films like this is that the monsters seem to be such "ordinary people". The next door neighbor you've been hanging around with for years. Your best buddy. Or think of the character in The Stepfather. He couldn't possibly be more personable. More normal.

Look for the BTK killer.

at wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Clovehitch_Killer
trailer: https://youtu.be/aJO3G17JqZ8

The Clovehitch Killer [2018]
Directed by Duncan Skiles

Tyler [voiceover]: The first murder happened before I was born. The killer called himself Clovehitch after his favorite type of knot. Our town lived in fear. And then, ten years ago, he stopped. Every year, our community had a memorial for friends and family of the victims. At the time, I didn't think about it much.

...

Billy [noting a strange girl across the street]: She's here again.
Tyler: Who cares?
Billy: Just what is she doing? Planning a church shooting or something?
Tyler: She's not planning a church shooting.
Billy: She's not Christian. She's sick. I know her from school. She always does the same report about the killings every year.

...

Amy [showing Tyler a pornographic photograph she found under the seat of his truck]: Whoa, what is this?
Tyler: Um, where'd you get that?
Amy: Right there....Oh, my God. Is that what you're into?
Tyler: No! No, I.. I don't even know where this came from.
Amy: Okay, well, it's your truck.
Tyler: Yeah, but that isn't mine.

...

Tyler: Is this about the photo?
Amy: No, I texted like one person who I thought would never tell.
Tyler: I don't even know what that was. It wasn't mine, okay? It was in my dad's truck.


And then, just like that, it all begins.

Don [Tyler's father]: Okay. Sex. There, I said it. You know we're made in God's image. That means your body is a holy thing not to be desecrated. You know what that means?
[Tyler nods]
Don: But, men like you and me we got thoughts. We got thoughts that start to. Start to pop into our heads. You ever get those thoughts, bud? Thoughts about girls? I get it. I mean, believe it or not, I was 16 once. We're in a bit of a pickle, aren't we? We got God over here on this side and we got a sex-crazed monkey over here on this side. You with me so far, bud?
Tyler: Not really.
Don: Here's the thing. It's okay to have thoughts. That's just a fantasy. God will look the other way. He's a busy man. But no pictures. Got it? A fantasy's okay, it's not real. It's just.. It's just monkey stuff.
Tyler: Yeah. Monkey stuff.

...

Kassi: The fuck you following me for?
Tyler: You remember me, right?
Kassi: Tyler the perv. How's the perving?
Tyler: Why are you always reading the newspaper outside of our church?
Kassi: I like bad news. And I can sit wherever I want. I thought you people were supposed to be all friendly and giving and shit?
Tyler: No, yeah, no. It's totally fine.
Kassi: Great.
Tyler: Hey, um, you know about that Clovehitch stuff, right? 'Cause I was thinking maybe I could ask you a few questions 'cause I was on some bad website and...
Kassi: Oh, I get it. You heard that rumor about me and the five guys on the football team. And you thought that if you...
Tyler: No. No, no, no.
Kassi: It's okay. I'm a slut, you're a perv. We were made for each other.

...

Tyler: So you were staking out our church to, what, narrow it down? Whoever was going back there?
Kassi: No. Cops already did that. I'm using the FBI playbook. I'm gonna catch him using his weakness.
Tyler: And what's that?
Kassi: He's insane. Every killer has an MO tied to his psychology. It's like a fingerprint. Look. Same entry points, same elaborate ropes on the bodies the clove hitch tied to every victim's house, his signature. He's taunting the cops, using the victims as trophies. It's meticulous and planned. I'm gonna use that fingerprint to connect him to new cases. I don't think he's stopped killing. I think there's more than ten victims.
Tyler: But he has stopped.
Kassi: Serial killers can't stop.

...

Don [to Tyler]: You can pull the wool over your mother's eyes, but not mine. Who was it you were visiting when you're supposed to be tutoring?


It's a cat and mouse game between them now. Father and son. Neither of whom quite know what to believe about the other.

Cindy [Tyler's mom]: So, Kassi, where do you go to church?
Kassi: Oh, I don't go to church. Um, my dad's usually hungover on Sundays and my mom left when I was little. So, um, I'm basically an atheist but I'm considering getting into Wicca.
Cindy: Wicca? Wha..No, I've heard of that. It...it's not black magic, it's um...a nature-based spiritual...
Tyler: Oh, Mom. She's...she's just joking.

...

Kassi: So, Mr. Burnside, um...you teach Tyler and everybody about camping and whittling. And tying knots? So, how many knots do you know...?

...

Kassi: So...You think your dad is Clovehitch? It's not your fucking dad.
Tyler: He has pictures. Like bondage porno stuff. That's why everyone thinks I'm a perv. I went in his shed where no one is allowed, and there was more. There was even one that said Nora on it, and. I think that was for Nora Devlin. Right next to it, it says, "Lucky's favorite" on it.
Kassi: There's no way in hell your dad is Clovehitch just because he likes weird porn. He's just kinky.

...

Don: Thought we'd get an early start. You know what we haven't done in a while? Camping. Just you and me.
Tyler: Yeah, today?
Don: Yeah. Thought we'd go have some fun. Father-son bonding. Lock up that rifle badge.

...

Tyler [out in the woods with his father]: Where are we going?
Don: We're almost there, bud.

...

Don [cleaning his rifle]: Did you tell anyone?
[Tyler says nothing]
Don: Did you tell anyone?
Tyler: What are you talking about?
Don: Tyler, I know you've been in the shed and in the crawlspace. You had no business invading my privacy. The lack of respect is really disturbing, Tyler. You know better than that. A lock on that door for a reason. What you found in that box wasn't mine.
Tyler: Whose is it?
Don: Rudy's.
Tyler: Uncle Rudy?
Don: The truth is, I'm ashamed to say. I had an interest in those kinds of photos that you found in the truck a long time ago, years ago. Rudy was the same way, only much, much worse.


Who to believe? What to believe?

Tyler: But it looks like it's you.
Don: Bud. Bud, I don't know, I don't know what else to tell you. Other than I know that you know. It isn't me. It's not me. I'm just so..I'm just so damned sorry to to put you through all that. I messed up. I was trying to protect my brother.
Tyler: We have to take it to the police. Or destroy it. But you have to decide.

...

Kassi: He came in through the basement. And then tied her up. And tortured her here. Then he killed her. This is where they found the body.
Tyler: Why are you doing this?
Kassi: What did your dad tell you? Tyler. I'm not accusing your dad. I just wanna know what happened.
Tyler: It was Uncle Rudy.
Kassi: In the wheelchair? How long has he been like that?
Tyler: Ten years. That's why he stopped. He told me it was a car accident but...it was suicide. Attempted suicide.
Kassi: I found something in the pit under your house.
Tyler: Y...you said there was nothing under there.
Kassi: There were rope fibers.
Tyler: Rope fibers? Look, this isn't CSI. I know that you love being obsessed with Clovehitch because it makes you all dark and interesting but, but really, this is my family.
Kassi: He killed my mom.

...

Tyler: What was her name?
Kassi: Crystal.
Tyler: Crystal Harper?
Kassi [surprised]: How do you know that?
Tyler: Under the house. There was a box, and it had photos, and jewelry. And driver's licenses. There were 13 of them.
Kassi: Thirteen? Where are they?
Tyler: It wasn't gonna bring 'em back. And he's gone. We had to protect our family.
Kassi: So where are they?
Tyler: So we burned them. I'm sorry.
Kassi: Do you believe him? Is there any doubt in your mind? Please.

...

Tyler [watching Kassi spy on his father]: What are you expecting to see?
Kassi: Anything. There's no way he could be that sick and not give any hint.
Tyler: I've lived with him my whole life. There's no hint.

...

Kassi [to Tyler]: He tied this here. I saw him.

...

Tyler [aiming his rifle]: Dad.
Don [startled]: What are you doin' here?
Tyler: Is she okay?
Don: You should be gone. Oh, Tyler. You shouldn't see this.
Tyler: Dad!
Don: What did I teach you? You don't aim a weapon unless you intend to use it. Are you gonna shoot me, bud? Are you gonna shoot me, bud?
Tyler: You have to turn yourself in.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Sat Apr 06, 2019 11:11 pm

Ordinarily when I'm tuning into something called "a star is born" it's on the Science Channel. And not something out of Hollywood. But this one keeps popping up over and over and over and over again.

And being a "star" in the entertainment business is a hell of a lot more relevant to most folks than the stuff that came out of the Big Bang. And the more the world today makes each of us feel smaller and smaller and smaller, the more some will give almost everything they've got to becoming "famous".

And while there is nothing either inherently good or bad about these treks to the top of the charts, each of us will react to it in our own way. After all, just because you are worshipped and adored in our pop culture doesn't mean you can't have the sort of depth that makes you worth being interested in.

And it is always intriguing to imagine a "seasoned" artist on the way down coming into contact with a "struggling" artist on the way up. The personal and the political intertwined in a rampaging spiral that might go in any direction.

And then of course the Lady Gaga stuff. Yeah, we know that she can sing...but can she act? Remember, for example, Madonna?

Then the part that always fascinates me the most. Jackson needs a drink. He picks out a bar. He meets Ally. Her life is forever changed. And all seemingly out of the blue. A fluke, chance encounter.

IMDb

Like his character Jack, Bradley Cooper dealt with both alcohol and drug addiction. He has spoken publicly about how sobriety saved both his life and career.

For his role as Jackson Maine, Bradley Cooper was taught to play guitar by Lukas Nelson, son of Willie Nelson. The pair hung out in Cooper's basement almost every night for a year so that Cooper could learn how to perform and present himself like a musician.

Majority of the drag queens' scenes were unscripted and improvised. They originally had little dialogue but seeing that their candid jokes added so much entertainment value, Bradley Cooper decided to extend them and let them play around on their own. Willam Beli, the drag queen that played Crystal, even claimed that none of her original lines made it to the final cut and that all her scenes in the movie were out of improvisation.

Lady Gaga has said that she'd become so attached to her character during the shoot, she had to dye her hair blonde as soon as the film wrapped in order to 'release' Ally. She also said that in real life, she is nothing like her character Ally, the biggest difference being that she was extremely ambitious about her career from a young age and was classically trained in music, while Ally is starting off a late bloomer with no self-confidence in her talent.


trivia at IMDb: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1517451/tr ... tt_trv_trv
at wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Star_Is_Born_(2018_film)
trailer: https://youtu.be/nSbzyEJ8X9E

A Star Is Born [2018]
Written in part and directed by Bradley Cooper

Ally: Fuck! God! Fucking men!

...

Ramon: My man, my man, I...Aren't you like...
Jack: This is a bar, right?
Ramon: Yeah, but not your kind of place.
Jack: They got alcohol?
Ramon: Well, yeah, but...
Jack: It's my kind of place.

...

Jack: Do you do that often?
Ally: Do what?
Jack: The show.
Ally: Yeah, yeah. The girls are so nice to me here. I mean, they would never normally let a girl sing at one of these shows but they've always loved my voice. They used to beg me to sing. It's an honour, really. I get to be one of the gay girls.

...

Jack: Do you write songs or anything?
Ally: I don't sing my own songs.
Jack: Why?
Ally: I just...I just don't feel comfortable.
Jack: Why wouldn't you feel comfortable?
Ally: Um... Well, cos, like, almost every single person that I've come in contact with in the music industry has told me that my nose is too big and that I won't make it.
Jack: Your nose is too big?
Ally: Yeah.
Jack: Your nose is beautiful.

...

Jack: You're lucky.
Ally: My nose has not made me lucky. I could've had maybe a hit song if it wasn't for my nose.
Jack: That's fucking bullshit.
Ally: No, it's not bullshit because you go into these rooms and there's all these fucking men in there and they're just staring at you, listening to your record, going, "Oh, you sound great, but you don't look so great."

...

Jack [to Ally]: Look, talent comes everywhere. Everybody's talented. Bet you fucking everybody in this bar is talented in one thing or another, but having something to say... and the way to say it so people listen to it, that's a whole other bag. And unless you get out there and you try to do it, you'll never know. That's just the truth. If there's one reason we're here, it's to say something so people wanna hear it.

...

Jack: It's a good thing we met. For both of us. Trust me.
Ally: I don't know what is going on. Honestly, what...
Jack: Who does?

...

Jack [whispering to Ally]: Can I tell you a secret? I think you might be a songwriter.

...

Jack: Hey.
Ally: What?
Jack: I just wanted to take another look at you.

...

Lorenzo [Ally's father]: I want my friends to look at you. Take a good look. With a voice like from heaven, but you know what? It's not always the best singers that make it. You know? I knew a couple of guys could sing Sinatra under the table. But Frank, he'd come on stage with the blue eyes, the sharkskin suit, the patent leather shoes...he becomes Frank Sinatra. And everybody else, all these other guys...that really got it, that really have it inside... just a bunch of nobodies.

...

Bobby: You gotta put 'em in your ears, man.
Jack: I told you, I can't wear those. When I wear 'em, it's just in my head, and I need to be here.
Bobby: The doctor said it's the only way to manage this thing, Jack. You're not gonna get back what you lost. It's the only way we can manage what you still got.

...

Lorenzo: Look, a guy like that invites you to a show...It could be a great opportunity.
Ally: Dad, don't start with me!
Lorenzo: Listen. Does he know you sing at all? Did he hear anything from you? It's the opportunity of a lifetime.
Ally: I don't have the same disease you have. You get around celebrities like they're gonna rub off on you.
Lorenzo: What are you talking about?
Ally: "Oh, you know who I drove?" Like magic, now you're famous. And you're not. It's not magic, Dad.
Lorenzo: Sweetheart.
Ally: He's a drunk! You know all about drunks.

...

Bobby [to Ally]: He's out. You think maybe he drinks a bit much? Sweetie, you have no idea. Tell you one thing, though. He's never brought a girl on stage before. And it's been a long, long time since he played like that.

...

Jack: You come and sing with me.
Ally: Where?
Jack: Well, first stop's Arizona.
Ally: I'm never getting on that thing with you when you've been drinking.
Jack: I haven't even thought about drinking or anything else.
Ally: We'll see how long that lasts.

...

Jack [after punching Bobby in the face]: You sold Dad's ranch! They turned it into a fucking wind farm! I bought that for you. Where's his grave?
Bobby: He washed away in a fucking storm. His grave isn't there any more. I told you, but you were fucking drunk. You were fucking loaded...and already pissing yourself a swan song. Fuck if you shed a tear for that piece of shit you idolise for no goddamn fucking reason. All Dad ever did for you...was make you his fucking drinking buddy. And you'd be right there with him if he was still alive and you fucking know it. What did you think... that I was gonna fucking take care of it...while I'm fucking cradling your ass all over the goddamn world?
Jack: Yeah. That's a good excuse. Raising a little brother so you don't have to deal with the fact that you were no fucking good.
Bobby: If I was no good, why'd you steal my fucking voice? Huh?
Jack: Cos you had nothing to fucking say. You were too proud to sing any of the songs I ever wrote.
Bobby: Well, I got something to say now, pal. I'm done being your fucking errand boy. I quit.

...

Rez: That was unbelievable what you did.
Ally: Thank you.
Rez: I don't know if you know about me, about where I've come from. I'm Rez Gavron.
Ally: I know who you are.
Rez: What you have right now goes way beyond just this. There's people who need to hear what you have to say musically. This is not normal stuff. It's really amazing what you're doing. I think you have it all. I do. And the question to you is, "What do you want?" I'm in that position, to put you wherever you want to be.
Ally: I...I don't...I don't have...I gotta talk to Jack.

...

Ally: He said that he thought Interscope Records might really wanna sign me. And he said that he has this wonderful studio with a beautiful live room and these amazing producers he wants to bring in to record my songs. And he loves Look What I've Found. Remember the song we did in the diner? Remember, when we were driving?
Jack: Yeah.
Ally: Yeah? I mean, it was so nice talking to him, and he really believes in me.
[Jack falls to the floor in a drunken stupor]
Woman: You all right, Jack?
Ally: He's OK. He's fine. He does this all the time.

...

Ally: Hey, Jack. What's going on? Hm? What are you doing?
[Jack smears cream cheese up and down her face]
Ally: Oh. You jealous fuck.

...

Rez: What happened with the dancers there?
Ally: I just thought that I should do it alone cos it's so overwhelming.
Rez: OK, but you can't go rogue on me. You have to understand that this is what I do and you have to trust me, OK? So, if I give you a couple of dancers, don't not use them and then miss a couple of steps, OK? We also have to change your hair. We have to change the colour of your hair.
Ally: What's wrong with my hair?
Rez: I'm thinking platinum, or...
Ally: I don't wanna be fucking blonde. I am who I am, and I'm worried about Jack.


The part where the show becomes a business.

George: She's good, bro.
Jack: I know.
George: Maybe she's a way out. Ain't nothing to be afraid of, bro. You know, it's like... I don't know... You... You float out... float out at sea, and then... one day, you find a port, say, "I'm gonna stay here for a few days." A few days becomes a few years. And then you forgot where you were goin' in the first place. And then you realise you don't really give a shit about where you was going, cos you like where you're at. That's how it is for me.

...

Rez: You. SNL. Alec Baldwin hosting.
Ally: Did you get it?
Rez: Season finale.

...

Jack: Listen, if I just don't say this, I'll never forgive myself.
Ally: What?
Jack: If you don't dig deep in your fucking soul...you won't have legs. I'm just telling you that. You don't tell the truth out there, you're fucked. All you got is you, and what you wanna say to people. They are listening now. They're not gonna be listening forever. Trust me. So you gotta grab it. And you don't apologise, you don't worry about why they're listening or how long they're gonna be listening, you just tell 'em what you wanna say.

...

Ally: You wanna be my drinking buddy? Wanna practise?
Jack: I don't think you could handle it. Know why? Cos you're too worried about what everybody else is thinking.
Ally: Here we go, Jack. You want me to be your dad? Be your drinking buddy?
Jack: Yeah, you couldn't be my dad if you fucking tried. He had more talent in his finger than you have in your whole body. So don't even fucking go there about that, all right? That's over the fucking line.
Ally: Why don't you have another drink and we can just get fucking drunk until we fucking disappear, OK? Do you got those pills?
Jack: You're just fucking ugly, that's all.
Ally: I'm what?
Jack: You're just fucking ugly.
Ally: Get the fuck out! Get out! I said, get out!

...

Jack: What do you mean, they don't want me to sing?
Bobby: They hired this fucking kid at the last minute. They didn't tell me a fucking thing. Look, we've been on that other side before. More than once. Truth is, I didn't deliver.
Jack: Well, it's a good thing I know the... how to play the guitar. It's fine, I'll do it.
Bobby: You're gonna do it?
Jack: Sure.

....

Ally: I thought he was supposed to be singing....oh, God!

...

Ally: I have figured out what I think is the best solution for both of us. Jack should come out on tour with me. We'll start with our duets. I know he's gonna be able - to play by himself. Rez: You realise that's not an option.
Ally: He's... He's so inside of his art in a way he has never been. He can hear himself again.
Rez: Ally, there is no way that you can take Jack on tour with you. There's no way. Do you understand what I'm saying?
Ally: If you can't make that happen, then fucking cancel the tour.

...

Jack [to Bobby]: Hey, you know...when I...when I said I...you know, when I took your voice, you know. It was you I idolised. It wasn't Dad.

...

Rez [to Jack]: We're not exactly friends here. While you've been away, we've been back here in serious triage, trying to clean up your fucking mess. Barely finding our way through it. You almost single-handedly derailed her whole career. You understand that? She's never gonna say this to you. She loves you too much. Just by staying married to you, she looks like a joke. It's embarrassing. Let's be honest, we both know it's only a matter of time before that's pushed aside again for the real thing. And when that happens...I don't want her anywhere near you.

...

Jack: Hey.
Ally: What?
Jack: I just wanted to take another look at you.

...

Bobby: Some kid started singing one of his songs in a bar I was in the other night. They're playing his songs everywhere. At first I got angry. I don't know why. I guess I felt like..."How can any of these people feel like they knew him?" Who he really was. But then something changed. And it soothed me. That it wasn't...wasn't all for fucking nothing.
Ally: The last thing I did was lie to him.
Bobby: Listen to me. It isn't your fault. It just isn't. You know whose fault it was? Jack. That's it. No-one else. Not you, not me. No-one but Jack.

...

Bobby: Jack talked about how music is essentially 12 notes between any octave. 12 notes and the octave repeats. It's the same story. Told over and over. Forever. All any artist can offer the world... is how they see those 12 notes. That's it. Hm. He loved how you see them. He just kept saying..."I love how she sees them, Bobby."
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Sat Apr 13, 2019 11:19 pm

Annie is the "long suffering" girlfriend of Duncan. She begins a "trans-Atlantic romance" with "once revered, now faded, singer-songwriter" Tucker. Meanwhile Tucker has become the "musical obsession" of Duncan.

Yes, another "romantic comedy" about a life-changing rendezvous with second chances. In other words, the first relationship is kaput. But here is a chance to rebound into a new relationship. One that might even actually last. Meanwhile, we're in the audience sizing these people up. What we want is to be able to identify with at least one of them so that we can at least root for one or the other relationship.

Now, it's a comedy so we expect to find reasons to actually laugh. But are these people worth investing two hours of your life emotionally? Are the parts that are anything but laughing matters worth committing to? Well, as one IMDb reviwer put it, "[t]he jokes are subtle, clever, original" with "[c]onvincing acting, real characters, none of that fake, plastic Hollywood thing."

That works for me.

And, let's face it, when it comes to musicians and fans, there is no predicting what might tumble out of peoples mouths. Or what they might actually be inclined to do. Some people take their music very, very seriously. And this is based on a novel from Nick "High Fidelity" Hornby.

Then the part that revolves around the gap between what the fan[atic] thinks about a legendary rock musician and what the musician himself thinks about that. After all, imagine how embarrassing that can be.

IMDb

The film involves musicians and fans. In real life, the director of the film Jesse Peretz is also a musician.

In Duncan's final video (during the credits), there is a copy of David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest behind him. First, that novel inspires a number of fans who are as obsessed with Foster Wallace as Duncan is with Tucker Crowe. Second, those obsessed fans are often youngish to middle-aged men, much like Duncan.

According to an interview with Yahoo program Build, during filming, Rose Byrne cut one of her index fingers clean off with a blender. It had to be surgically reattached.


at wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juliet,_Naked_(film)
trailer: https://youtu.be/oMjSNkAaABs

Juliet, Naked [2018]
Directed by Jesse Peretz

The backstory :

Duncan [videoblogging]: Hello, welcome to Can You Hear Me? Your source for all things Tucker Crowe. If you're here, you're probably already a fan of Tucker's music, but if you're merely Crowe-curious or you clicked on the link by accident, allow me introduce you to one of the most seminal and yet unsung figures of alternative rock. Although Tucker started writing songs in his early teens, his real breakthrough was the release of the 1993 album Juliet. It earned respectable college radio play, but was vastly underappreciated by the mainstream. On the list of Top Heartbreak Albums on RollingStone.com it comes only 43rd, which is a joke. Juliet, quite simply, is a masterpiece. Tucker wrote it after a whirlwind love affair with Julie Beatty, a model and fixture of the Los Angeles demimonde. The termination of their brief tryst simultaneously inspired him and crushed his soul. In June of that same year, 1993, Tucker played an engagement at the Pit Club in Minneapolis, United States, that would prove to be his final show. Last seen exiting the men's toilets after his first set, Tucker abruptly canceled all future shows, and has never performed publicly again. This snapshot, taken in 2014, is purported to be of Tucker on his sheep farm in Pennsylvania, although there is quite a lot of debate as to its authenticity. The true whereabouts and creative endeavors of Mr. Crowe remain a mystery. Be sure to click on the Mystery link of the side of the page.


Or, rather, Duncan's version of it.

Annie [voiceover]: Duncan's own obsessions dominate my life. And it's become clear that all along, he's been in love with another man. Not like that, but in an equally consuming and, quite frankly, really bothersome way. He is the ringleader of a community of 200 middle-aged men who gather together to obsessively deconstruct their hero's music and attempt to crack his mysteries.

...

Carly: So, do you guys have kids?
Annie: Oh, no, they're against Duncan's religion.
Ros: She's joking.
Duncan: She's not, actually. Annie and I decided a long, long time ago, that babies weren't our jam. The important thing is, we're happy where we are. I mean, who wants to bring kids into this bloody world?
Annie: Fuck kids.
Duncan: You know? Right?
Annie: Fuck them.


Annie wants kids

Gina: So, that Greek tragedy thing...?
Duncan: Right. Yeah...I guess my point was that these characters, they're already bound to their fate. Like Antigone.
Gina: Wow.
Duncan: Or Medea.
Gina: So I have to read Antigone to understand The Wire?
Duncan: Not strictly speaking, but it wouldn't hurt.

...

Gina: Okay, I'm going to sound like a wanker, but I'm going to say it anyway. I believe in the power of art. I believe that creativity can change people's lives.
Duncan: That's fucking refreshing. I just...I hope you haven't come to the wrong place.
Gina: Why?
Duncan: The next Bob Dylan could be playing up there, these people wouldn't look up from their fucking sudoku.

...

Annie [about new music from Tucker]: I should have warned you that it was so dreary. I didn't say anything.
Duncan: Dreary?
Annie: Yeah. I mean, I suppose it's interesting if you've heard the finished version, but... What did you think?
Duncan: What did I think? I think it's a bloody masterpiece, Annie. Dreary? You can't be serious. Oh, what else is dreary according to you? The Sopranos? Hamlet? Jeez Louise. This is history, Annie. I'm going to write it.
Annie: It is not history, it's boring versions of songs that you've heard a million times before.
Duncan: Oh, my God, you think that's what this is? This is big for me, that this has happened. And I just don't want to spend my time in the aftermath of this new information with someone who doesn't get it. I want to spend it with people who do.

...

Duncan: 158. Oh, somebody new. This is a long one. "Relic Master" they go by. They claim to have already heard the album. I doubt that. Let's see what they..."Juliet, Naked is naked all right. A naked attempt to squeeze a few more quid out of a long-dead career." Sounds like you and he would get along swimmingly.
Annie: She.
Duncan: No, I seriously doubt it's a woman. We don't get a lot of lady visitors.
Annie: Well, it is.

...

Tucker [voiceover from an email to Annie]: Bingo. You nailed it. I couldn't have explained it better myself. All good things, Tucker Crowe. P.S., the folks on that website, they seem pretty weird, so I'd be grateful if you didn't pass on the address. Thanks.

...

Tucker [voiceover from email to Annie]: Yes, it is really me. Although, I can't think of a real way of proving it to you. How about this...I didn't see the face of God in a Minneapolis toilet bowl. I haven't been secretly making R&B albums with Lauryn Hill. I don't have 200 hours' worth of material locked in a shed, contrary to what your friends on the website may think. In fact, my guitar hasn't been out of its case for years. I currently live in the garage behind the house where my son Jackson lives with my ex."

...

Tucker [voiceover in text to Annie]: What to do if you've wasted 15 years of your life? All right, first off, you have to whittle that number down. Subtract all the time spent reading good books, having enjoyable conversations and sleeping, because those are important things. And you should be able to bring that squandered time down to more like 10, and anything under a decade you're allowed to write off for tax purposes. That's a joke.

...

Annie [voiceover in email to Tucker]: My dad died when Ros was only 12, and we'd already lost our mom. So it was just the two of us. By the time my boyfriend and I moved in together, I'd had my share of parenting. Or so I thought. Now, with irritating predictability, I've started aching for a child, for all the usual reasons, like wanting to feel unconditional love, as opposed to faint, conditional affection.

...

Tucker [voiceover in email to Annie]: I'm sorry about that ache. I wish I knew the thing to say. I don't imagine this is much of a consolation, but I've brought a lot of kids into the world, and most of them are just reminders of how I've blown it in that department. Sometimes my life looks like an endless streak of staring responsibility directly in the eye, and then running the other way.

...

Duncan: Hey, how do you even know about Grace?
Lizzie [daughter]: You let it slip to Mom back when you were in love and X-ing or something.
Duncan: Look, I realize it's an unforgivable chapter of my life, but I'm hoping not to be judged by that alone, okay?
Lizzie: Okay.


The mysterious Grace.

Annie [voiceover]: Tucker. I've just read through this thread and I've realized I've been sharing thoughts I've never said aloud to anybody. That's not a good sign, is it? I mean, maybe it is, but I've told my boyfriend nothing of our little email affair. It's like I'm dabbling in betrayal.

...

Ros: You already fancy someone, don't you? Come on, cough it up. Who is it?
Annie: It's nobody. It's just...well, I did...I met someone on the Internet.
Ros: I love it. The Internet. God, you're finally entering the modern age. Which site was it? One for clever people, no doubt. HornierStories.com?
Annie: Duncan's website.
Ros: Another Tucker Crowe loser? Oh, Jesus, Annie, are you mental?
Annie: No, it's weirder than that. It's actually Tucker Crowe.
Ros: No, it's not.
Annie: I'm not kidding.
Ros: Tucker Crowe. As in, Duncan's idol Tucker Crowe.
Annie: Yes. What happened was he read that review I posted.
Ros: This is that syndrome.
Annie: What syndrome?
Ros: Where someone falls in love with their captor.

...

Tucker [voiceover in email to Annie]: Big news. I'm coming to London.

...

Annie [on phone]: Hello?
Duncan: Hi, it's Tucker.
Annie: I'm dying to hear your excuse.
Duncan: Well, it's...it's pretty good. Um...I had a heart attack.

...

Duncan [to Lizzie and Zak]: Annie's my friend from England. We were supposed to hook up yesterday, but then that didn't go so well.
Annie: We don't even know each other...
Duncan: Well, we know each other. We met on a website.
Lizzie: A website?
Annie: Not that kind of website.

...

Annie [on phone]: It was silly of me to have come. I don't know what I was thinking.
Duncan: No, it was kind of you to come. Look... one of the big problems with screwing up the first half of your life is, you know, try as you might, you can't press reset, you know? I mean, I...I can't get to zero, you know? And I was just wondering if you would...if we could try this one more time again tomorrow?
Annie: Are they still there, your ex-girlfriends? They were very nice.
Duncan: No, no, everybody's gone. Everybody except Jackson, says Jackson. Here he is. He wants to talk to you.
Jackson: Hi, Annie. I found out what a catheter is.

...

Tucker: Waterloo station, Jackson. Most famous spot in all of London.
Jackson: Really?
Tucker: For real. I mean, if you're a Kinks fan.

...

Annie [after Tucker stumbles into Duncan's shrine to him]: I can explain this.
Duncan: "Maxwell's, '89, Bar Astro-Dusseldorf". Did I play at Dusseldorf?
Annie: It's not what it looks like. I can explain.
Duncan [pointing to a photograph]: That's me and my high school chess club.
Annie: Really?
Duncan: Yeah.
Annie: I can explain this to you. I know this looks weird. Remember the review on the website? And the guy...it was a really over-the-top review, and you called him like a sad-sack blogger.
Tucker: Oh, Duncan-something?
Annie: Yes! God. Oh, my God, if he knew that you knew his name...
Tucker: So, that guy is the guy. Oh, that's your 15 years of...
Annie: Yes! Yeah, yeah, yeah. Yeah, yeah. Bingo. That's it. That's it. And this is his room... shrine... temple where he lives and worships you.

...

Annie: This is Duncan. Duncan Thomson.
Tucker [shaking Duncan's hand]: Tucker Crowe.
Annie: That's what I was trying to tell you.
Duncan: And I'm Stevie fucking Wonder. Who do you want to be? Eartha fucking Kitt?

...

Duncan: If she wants to make a sad spectacle of herself around town by hanging out with some guy old enough to be her father, that's her business. But mocking me by dragging Tucker into it is just embarrassing.
Gina: She was obviously just trying to wind you up.
Duncan: I know for a fact that there is no son. There were rumors of a daughter w ith a Swedish princess or potentially her cousin, but there's zero online chatter of a son.
Gina: Did it look like Tucker Crowe?
Duncan: No. God no.
[he looks at a photograph of a much younger Tucker Crowe]
Duncan: Not entirely. Fuck.

...

Annie: Can I ask you, what's the deal with Grace?
Tucker: What do you mean?
Annie: Why does her name bother you and the others don't?
Tucker: It doesn't bother me. I...I've never even met her.
Annie: How's that possible?

...

Duncan: There is a possibility that maybe I owe you an apology.
Tucker: Well, when will you know for sure?
Duncan: It occurs to me that there's no reason for you to claim that you are...he if you were not...he.
Tucker: Well, that's a start.
Duncan: It's just... I can't be certain, you know?
Tucker: Well, I have a passport.

...

Duncan: I'm sure Annie's told you, but I am a great admirer of your work, so...
Tucker: Cool.
Duncan: I don't think that I would be overstating the case to suggest that I am something of a world expert.
Tucker: I've read your stuff. It's...
Duncan: Okay. Wow. You can tell me where I've gone wrong.
Tucker: I wouldn't know where to start.

...

Duncan [after droning on and on about what he thinks he knows about Tucker]: I know the whole thing left you shattered. And I just want you to know that from that death was born a seminal masterwork.
Tucker: Oh, God, a masterwork?
Duncan: I don't use that word lightly, sir.
Tucker: All right, I was being really nice, okay? But it's clear that you don't know shit.
Duncan: Hey, am a I fan? Guilty as charged. Okay, yes. Am I a little overzealous in my quest for the truth?
Tucker: Listen, man, if you can't realize that Juliet is a piece of shit...
Duncan: Don't say that.
Tucker: Yeah, it is.
Duncan: You don't mean that.

...

Duncan: Maybe my review of your demos wasn't exactly correct, but that original album, Tucker? Do you have any idea how much that touches us? How much that has meant to me my whole life? The honesty in your words...
Tucker: Would you stop! It's not worth the effort.
Duncan: It is to me.

...

Duncan [getting up to leave]: I'm going to go. I'm going to...This feels like a mistake.
[he walks to the door then stops and turns around]
Duncan: Just one final thing. I think that people like you, people with real talent, you don't value it because it comes naturally to you. And we never value things that we...that come easily. But I value that album more than maybe anything I've ever heard. Not because it's perfect, but because of what it means to me. Ultimately, I don't give a shit what it means to you. Art isn't for the artist no more than water is for the bloody plumber. But thank you. I really, really enjoyed it.

...

Tucker: Last time I played a show I didn't even finish it. I was at this club called The Pit, and in between sets I went to the bathroom. And then my ex walks in the door. Julie. She's holding this baby. And I... and I acted all confused, as if, after we broke up, a million people hadn't called and told me that she was pregnant, you know? As if her brother hadn't cursed me out the day the child was born. But she... she held out this little girl and said, you know, "Don't you want to look at her?"
Annie: Grace?
Tucker: Yeah. Grace. And I looked at her. And then Julie said something, you know, that I didn't hear. Like, she said... she said something to me about the baby bottle, or she forgot her bag or something. I thought that she was abandoning the child with me. You know? And I just panicked. And I wanted to follow after her, but I... I didn't think that I could walk out of this club with this baby. There's all these people out there. So, I...I set Grace down. And then I walked out. I went into the parking lot, and I could hear everybody calling for me, but I... I didn't go back. And then I couldn't play any of those songs anymore, you know? After that, I just...I couldn't play these insipid, self-pitying songs about Julie breaking my heart. You know, they were a joke. And before I know it, a couple of decades have gone by and some doctor hands me...hands me Jackson. I hold him, you know, and I look at him. And I know that this boy...is my last chance.

...

Tucker [on phone]: Uh, is this Grace?
Grace: Speaking.
Tucker: This is Tucker Crowe.
Grace: Okay. And this is regarding...?

...


Tucker [on phone]: Listen, I'm sorry for calling you out of the blue but...
Grace: Look, as I said to Lizzie, I have a father already.
Tucker: Oh. Okay. Yeah, right. No, I understand. It's just, when you say that, do you mean... Do you mean biologically, or...?
Grace: I'm not sure of the distinction you're making.
Tucker: Yeah. Right. Yeah. Right. Right.
Grace: Whatever it is you're trying to work out, good luck. But it's just not going to involve me.
Tucker: Yes. Absolutely. I understand. Thank you.
[Grace hangs up]

...

Annie: Tucker, I was...It's silly.
Tucker: What is it?
Annie: What? I was wondering if you would be...if you'd be interested?
Tucker: What do you mean...?
Annie: I'm sorry. In me.
Tucker: In you? In you? What...how?
An nie: Oh, I mean, I...sexually.
Tucker: What do you mean? Like, here? Like right now?
Annie: Oh, no, no. I meant...in the future, later.
Tucker: Yes, definitely. I'm extremely interested.

...

Annie [to Duncan]: We broke up for a reason...You slept with somebody else because she had the correct response to an album.

...

Annie [voiceover]: Dear Tucker...I did receive your emails. Congratulations on getting your own place. I'm so sorry that I haven't replied sooner. I've just...I've been dealing with some really big life decisions. I moved to London, where I'm house-sitting for a friend of a friend, and I landed a job at a cool, little gallery. Somehow, the world just suddenly feels alive with possibility. I've also been seriously considering having a baby on my own. Last week, I finally gathered the nerve to go to a clinic and actually start the process. It's mental, right? Anyway, nothing's for certain, but whatever happens I feel I'll be all right. I can't believe Lizzie's boy is already a year old. She must be thrilled you're coming to visit. If you'd like to steal away for a cup of coffee, it'd be great to see you and catch up. I'd actually love that.

...

Duncan [voiceover as the end credits roll]: Apologies for my prolonged absence. I have been working through the news at hand and formulating an opinion with the care and judiciousness I believe the moment calls for. I'm speaking, of course, of the fact that Tucker has a new album. It's called So Where Was I? It's his first release of new material in 25 years. What is my verdict? Well, to quote another critic: "What is this shite?" We have a song about the pleasures of reading in the afternoon. We have a song about homegrown green beans. There's a little ditty expounding the joys of being a stepfather. I mean, in short, we have a tragedy. And there's a drum machine. There's a drum machine on a Tucker Crowe album. I mean, what the fuck? You may ask, as I did, what caused Tucker to produce this cloying, bloodless, catastrophe? Well, reportedly, Tucker has found love. And I am here to tell you, my friends, it doesn't suit him.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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iambiguous
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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Sun Apr 21, 2019 12:17 am

For many liberals here [no doubt] reactions to Donald Trump were first born and bred in reactions to Dick Cheney. You might even say that in reacting to Cheney they were just cutting their teeth in preparation for Trump.

Both men are basically the embodiment of America Inc. They are the swamp in Washington. A "deep state" that reflects the nature of crony capitalism in our post modern world. That Trump promised to drain it is just one more instance of irony awash in an American political economy that has never been equalled in fooling most of the people most of the time.

Still, few today will doubt that Trump is in fact the utterly narcissistic blowhard calling the shots in the Oval Office. No one speculates that perhaps it is MIke Pence who is pulling the strings [and calling the shots] behind the curtain. Back then though some were arguing that for all practical purposes Dick Cheney was the President of the United States. At least insofar as basic economic and foreign policy issues were concerned

Then the part that revolves around the gap between what unfolds up on the screen and what was actually exchanged between these [mostly] men in "real life". There are conversations between the characters that can only be verified if one of them confirmed them. And even then only if they aren't just lying through their teeth.

It's all about the gap between government as it is encompassed in many civics text and the way in which power is actually manifested out in the real world. Any number of liberals among us will still insist that this is all about political ideals and moral integrity. About who is really for and against "the people". And, sure, given the complexity of human interactions, that is not something that can ever be entirely effaced. Especially in regard to any number of "social" issues. But those parts that Marx and Engels [among others] were more interested in are, still, in the view of some, beyond the purview of the media industrial complex represented by the likes of [among others] MSNBC, the New York Times and the Washington Post.

IMDb

Christian Bale said that due to the improvisational directing style of Adam McKay, he had to do more research for this film than any other film he's done. In order to ad-lib in character, Bale not only needed to have Dick Cheney's mannerisms and vernacular down, but he also had to know which policies, their instances, and abbreviations the Vice President would be aware of at any given moment in his life.

Christian Bale gained 45 pounds, shaved his head, bleached his eyebrows and exercised to thicken his neck for his role as Cheney. Bale said he achieved his hefty physique for the film by eating a lot of pies.

This is the first movie in which the focus is on a real life US Vice President who did not become President.

The more Adam McKay plunged into Dick Cheney's political career, the more he realized that he had a lasting and considerable influence on contemporary American politics. His mission, in his eyes, was to write a scenario that goes beyond political beliefs and addresses universal themes.

Like many Americans, Adam McKay knew little of the elusive - and seemingly impenetrable - Dick Cheney who was almost co-chairing George W. Bush from 2001 to 2009. And that, in turn, upset the course of the American history, if not forever, at least for decades to come.


trivia at IMDb: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt6266538/tr ... tt_trv_trv
at wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vice_(2018_film)
trailer: https://youtu.be/g09a9laLh0k


Vice [2018]
Written and directed by Adam McKay

Title card: The following is a true story. Or as true as it can be given that Dick Cheney is one of the most secretive leaders in history. But we did our fucking best.

...

Narrator [on the meeting in the White House on 9/11]: By all accounts of what people saw in that room on that terrible day, there was confusion, fear, uncertainty, but Dick Cheney saw something else that no one else did... he saw an opportunity. As the world becomes more and more confusing, we tend to focus on the things that are right there in front of us. While ignoring the massive forces that actually change and shape our lives. And with people working longer and longer hours, for less and less wages, when we do have free time, the last thing we want is complicated analysis of our government, lobbying, international trade agreements and tax bills. So it's no surprise that when a monotone bureaucratic Vice President came to power. We hardly noticed. As he achieved a position of authority that very few leaders in the history of our nation ever have. Forever changing the course of history for millions and millions of lives. And he did it like a ghost. With most people having no idea who he is or where he came from.

...

Narrator: How does a man go on to become who he is? Well it starts in 1963. When Dick's best girl Lynne was getting straight A's at Colorado College. Lynne had helped Dick get a scholarship at Yale, where he did way more drinking than class attending. Pretty soon Dick got the boot. So he went back home to Wyoming to work as a lineman for the state. Back then they would have been called a guy like him a ne’er-dowell. In today’s parlance they would just call him a dirt bag.

...

Lynne [to Dick]: You’re sorry? One time is “I’m sorry.” Two times makes me think I’ve picked the wrong man! They kicked your ass out of Yale for drinking and fighting! Now are you just a lush who’s going to hang power lines for the state? Are we going to live in a trailer and have ten children!? Is that the plan?!

...

Dick: I love you, Lynne.
Lynne: Then prove it! I can’t go to a big Ivy League school! I can’t run a company or be Mayor! That’s just the way the world is for a girl! I need you! And right now you’re a big fat piss soaked zee-ro! Can you change? Or am I wasting my goddamn time?
Dick: I won't ever disappoint you again.

...

Title card: “Beware the quiet man. For while others speak, he watches. And while others act, he plans. And when they finally rest...he strikes.” Anonymous.

...

Narrator: Donald Rumsfeld, or Rummy as they called him, was the former captain of the Princeton wrestling team and an elite navy jet pilot. Most Congressmen used their power like an axe, Rumsfeld used his like a master of the Butterfly knives. And like any master if you got in his way, he would cut you.

...

Narrastor: Roger Ailes, founder of FOX News. He first pitched the idea as conservative news when he worked for Nixon as a media advisor.

...

Dick: Roger wants Nixon to start a Republican TV news network.
Rumsfeld: Forget it. Roger knows TV. But he doesn’t know politics.

...

Narrator: For a man like Donald Rumsfeld he only wanted three things from his lackey: he had to keep his mouth shut, do what he was told and always be loyal.


His lackey here being Dick Cheney.

Rumsfeld: So is it a yes or a no?
Dick: It’s a yes.
Rumsfeld: You don’t even know what the question is do you?
Dick: I, uh, I assume it was....
Rumsfeld: No, no, no. Good. That’s exactly the kind of “yes” I was looking for.

...

Narrator: Cheney had always been a so-so student and a mediocre athlete. But now finally he had found his life's calling, he would be a dedicated and humble servant to power.

...

Rumsfeld [to Cheney]: Because of the conversation Nixon and Kissinger are having right behind this door, five feet away from us in a few days, 10 thousand miles away a rain of 750 pound bombs dropped from B-52s flying at twenty thousand feet will hit villages and towns across Cambodia...thousands will die and the world will change either for the worse or the better. That’s the kind of power that exists in this squat little ugly building. But screw Kissinger, he’s overrated. Come on!

...

Dick: So, what do we believe?
Rumsfeld [laughing harder and harder]: “What do we believe?” Good one Cheney! Good one!

...

Rumsfeld [after Nixon resigns]: So what’s the plan?
Dick: The plan? Well the plan is to take over the damn place...
Rumsfeld: Who lit a fire under your ass?
Dick: I haven’t flipped cards in a long time Don.

...

Narrator [On Cheney pitching an idea to President Ford]: One of Dick Cheney’s super powers, was the ability to make the most wild and extreme ideas sound measured and professional.

...

Voice on the radio: They’re calling it the Halloween Massacre. Donald Rumsfeld has replaced Secretary of Defense James Slessinger. And Dick Cheney has been chosen as the...
Lynne: ...the youngest Chief of Staff in history! It’s like a dream.
Dick: It’s real. And Don is the youngest Secretary of Defense ever.

...

Narrator: And as the new Chief of Staff and with the Presidency weakened by Watergate, Dick Cheney wanted to find out exactly how much power did the President have. Antonin Scalia, a young lawyer with the justice department who would later go on to serve on the Supreme Court, rocked Dick’s world.

...

Scalia: Have you heard of the theory of the unitary executive?
Dick: No, tell me about it.
Scalia: It’s an interpretation a few, like myself happen to believe, of Article two of the Constitution that vests the President with absolute executive authority. And I mean absolute.

...

Narrator: The Unitary Executive Theory. Certain legal scholars believe that if the President does anything it must be legal because it’s the President. To hell with checks and balances, especially during times of war. This was the power of kings, pharaohs, dictators. Dick Cheney was a foot soldier in the power games of Washington DC, but with the Unitary Executive Theory, he could become Galactus, devourer of planets. But then it was Election Day and there was one big problem...


Jimmy Carter is now the President elect.

Dick [to Lynne]: I don’t want anyone to panic. But I do believe I have to go to the hospital. Now.

...

Narrator: A hard wind of change had been blowing through America, civil rights, Roe versus Wade, environmentalism. But there was a part of the country that was angry at this change and wanted it to stop. And then big money families like the Kochs and the Coors that were sick of paying income taxes, rolled into Washington DC and started writing fat checks to fund right wing think tanks that would change the way many Americans looked at the world.


CATO, The Heritage Foundation, The American Enterprise Institute etc.

Narrator: Finally in 1980, this unlikely revolution of the super rich and white conservatives found its face It was the fucking 1980’s, and it was a hell of a time to be Dick Cheney.

...

Bush Sr.: Dick. I just wanted to say thank you for getting the House not to override the President’s veto of the fairness doctrine.
Dick: Not a problem. Happy to get rid of any big government regulations.
Narrator: The fairness doctrine was a law from the forties that required any broadcast TV or radio news to present both sides of an issue equally. Its repeal would lead to the rise of opinion news...

...

News anchor: ...And eventually to the realization of Roger Ailes’ dream: Fox News. Which would go on to dominate all other news and swing America even more to the right.

...

Lynne: Can you feel it Dick? Half the room wants to be us and the other half fears us. I know George is up next but after that, who knows? She rubs her hand against his back.
Dick: I respect the hell out of Reagan...But no one’s really shown the world the true power of the American Presidency...


Next up: The gay daughter. Then the fake closing credits.

Lynne: Who was on the phone?
Dick: It was someone from George Bush’s son’s campaign.
Lynne: Jeb?
Dick: No. George W... Jeb’s Florida.
Lynne: So what did they want?
Dick: They want to talk to me about being his running mate. They didn’t say it outright but I’ve made that call myself and that’s what they want.
Lynne: Vice President is a nothing job.
Dick: I’m just going to hear them out. I owe his Father that...
Lynne: VP just waits for the President to die. You’ve said it yourself.

...

George W: So listen, I’ve got a lack of experience problem in the polls and you’re one of the most experienced guys around. You wanna jump on board and be my Vice?
Dick: I'm honored.
George W: Don’t be honored. Fucking say yes Mr. Brass tacks.
Dick: I have to say no at this time.

...

Lynne: What are you thinking? I can tell you’re thinking.
Narrator: What was Dick Cheney thinking?
Dick: I’m thinking I’ve never seen anything like this.
Narrator: How many steps ahead was he looking? How did he feel about the opportunity that was in front of him? There are certain moments, that are so delicate. Like a teacup and saucer stacked on a teacup and a saucer stacked on a teacup and a saucer. And on and on. This moment could fall in any direction and change everything. Sadly there is no real way to know exactly what was going on with the Cheneys at this history changing moment. We can’t just snap into a Shakespearian Soliloquy that dramatizes every feeling and emotion. That’s just not the way the world works.

...

David: Dick we’re asking for all financials, all medical, all interviews, press, writings, legal records, family medical and family financials. Any more “comprehensive” and we’d need a rubber glove. Sorry Liz.
Liz: That wasn’t offensive. Should I be offended?
Lynne: I’m offended Dave wasn’t worried I’d be offended.
Liz: Oh, a rubber glove. Like a proctology exam. That’s...that’s disgusting.

...

Narrator: David Addington, Dicks main legal advisor and a huge believer in the Unitary Executive Theory. He was known for telling people to their face that they were stupid.
David [on phone]: So the Vice Presidency is part of the executive branch and because the VP casts tie breaking votes in the Senate, also part of the legislative branch, right?
Dick: Okay?
David: That means the VP is also not part of the executive or the legislative.
Dick: So one could argue neither branch has oversight of the VP?
David: Not only can “one” argue that, I’m arguing it right now.

...

George W: No. I meant are you going to be my VP? I want you.
Dick: I’m CEO of a large company. I’ve been Secretary of Defense, Chief of Staff... The Vice Presidency is a mostly symbolic job...
George W: Right, right. I can see how that wouldn’t be enticing to you.
Dick: However... the Vice Presidency is also defined by the President. If we were to have a different understanding...Maybe I could handle the more mundane parts of the job. Managing the bureaucracy, overseeing the military, energy, foreign policy...
George W: Go on, I'm listening.

...

Dick: And one last thing. My daughter Mary...
George W: Right...Rove told me she likes girls.
Dicvk: I know you’ll have to run against gay marriage for the south and the mid-west. But it’s my daughter and that line in drawn in concrete.
George W: So long as you don’t mind us pushing that messaging. Sure, we’re okay with you sitting that one out. I think it’s important for all the Marys in the world, you know? No problemo.
Dick: Then I believe this can work.

...

Narrator [after Cheney agrees to become Bush's VP]: Dick never filled out his own 83 question questionnaire. Full medical records were never handed over. No tax or corporate filings, nothing.

...

Libby: Gore rescinded his concession. They’re claiming Florida is too close to call.
Dick: He can’t fucking rescind his concession.
Libby: He just did. There’s going to be a recount. What should we do?
Dick: We play it like we’ve already won. Which means we need to staff the White House. Libby: Who’s leading the transition team?
Dick: I’ll do it.
Libby: Um, that’s not really something a Vice President does, is it?
Dick: It is now.

...

Dick: Halliburton gave us a 26 million dollar exit package. Twice as much as we were hoping for.
Lynne: They’re no dummies.

...

Narrator: December 12th 2000. Antonin Scalia, remember him? And the Supreme Court stopped the state of Florida from completing their recount. George W Bush and Dick Cheney were going to the Whitehouse by a margin of 537 votes.

...

Dick: Scooter, why don’t you let everyone know the lay of the land?
Libby: Of course. As you all know, I’m Scooter Libby, Dick’s Chief of Staff...But I’m also a special adviser to the President. Mary Matalin will serve as an adviser to the VP and to Bush. David Addington, Dick’s main legal counsel, will play center field on all matters relating to executive power. The President has Alberto Gonzales, Karl Rove and Karen Hughes as his team. Quite frankly Gonzales has no clue, Rove is a hack and Hughes should be in double A ball. So we will have fairly unobstructed access to the Oval Office. We will be automatically BCC’d on all emails the President receives or sends. As well as have access to his schedule the second it is set or changed.
Dick: We’ll also be receiving the daily intelligence briefing before the President so we can get inside the decision curve.
Rumsfeld: Jesus. Bush approved all of this?
Dick: We have...an understanding.

...

Libby: Okay, so over at the Pentagon we’ve got Don as Secretary of Defense. Paul Wolfowitz, who worked with Team B in the Ford days, as Undersecretary of Defense.
Dick: Let’s check what kind of plans they have to invade Iraq, okay Paul?
Paul: It’s already in the works.
Libby: We’ve got Ashcroft at the DOJ. State seems to be the only tricky department. That’s Colin Powell and his guy Lawrence Wilkerson.
Paul: We’ve got Bolton over there. He’s a loose cannon but loyal.
Libby: And this list of “our” people doesn’t include about 800 others lobbyists and industry insiders we placed in the regulatory jobs.

...

Narrator: Dick Cheney had used an old connection with former wrestling coach and speaker of the house Dennis Hastert to get an office at the House of Representatives. The house is where revenue bills originate and he wanted to be near the money faucet. And not one but two offices in the Senate. One at the Pentagon. And later when Cheney’s team was combing through the intelligence on Iraq, a conference room at the CIA.

...

Narrator: Cheney was everywhere. But the most powerful place in all of D.C. was a nondesript conferencec room at a relatively new think tank that had become the place to be in Washington DC. Americans for Tax Reform. Grover Norquist ran the anti-tax group with huge funding from the Koch brothers network, big oil and tobacco. His Wednesday meeting as it was called had become the center of the Republican world.

...

Norquist: Let’s talk about the estate tax. This has been hard to eliminate because the tax only applies to estates larger than 2 million dollars. But marketing guru Frank Luntz is here to help...
Luntz: Hello all. Getting regular people to support cutting taxes for the very wealthy has always been very difficult. But I think we’ve had a break through...

...

Luntz [at foucus group]: The Estate Tax kicks in for anyone inheriting over $2 Million dollars. How many of you have a problem with that?
[One man raises his hand].
Luntz: Now, how many of you would have a problem with something called a “death tax?”
[all twelve hands are raised]

...

Narrator: So with one of the biggest media and political machines every created behind him, Cheney was able to squash action Global Warming, cut taxes for the super rich and gut regulations for massive corporations.

...

Narrator: The details of Cheney's meetings with the energy CEO's were never disclosed. But a freedom of information request did provide some documents, including a map of Iraq's oil fields with all of the oil companies that would be interested in acquiring them if “somehow” they were ever to become available. And then, it happened.


9/11.

Narrator [commenting on the meeting in the underground bunker at the White House on 9/11]: Now we don't know what exactly what the people in that room were thinking, but it's safe to assume that at least one person wondered why, in the midst of the most fateful day in American history, was Dick Cheney talking to his lawyer?

...

Tenet: We’ve picked up chatter from wellknown Al Qaeda operatives celebrating today’s attack.
Rumsfeld: We shouldn’t rule out Iraq.
Rice: What’s Al Qaeda’s Leader’s name?
Tenet: His name is Osama Bin Laden
Clarke: But this is clearly Al Qaeda. I’ve been tracking their movements for years. They’re fingerprints are all over this.
Rumsfeld: Iraq has all the good targets.
Clarke: Iraq has nothing to do with this.
Rumsfeld: Richard you don’t know that for sure.
Clarke: I do know that.

...

Narrator: So while Powell, the CIA and their international coalition toppled the Taliban and took Afghanistan in a matter of days...Cheney had found something much more powerful than missiles or jet planes.

...

Bybee [on phone linkup]: So David tells me you're looking for executive authority. John Yoo is definitely your man.
Dick: The war we're now fighting will require resources and abilities that the, uh, current interpretation of the law impedes.
David: DAVID ADDINGTON The Vice President believes that it is the duty as Commander in Chief to protect that Nation. And that no other obligation whether it be Congress or existing treaties supersedes that duty... How do you feel about that statement?
Yoo: I couldn't agree more.

...

Narrator: John Yoo’s first legal opinion allowed the US government to monitor every citizen’s phone calls, texts and emails without a warrant. It was a giant legal leap based on sketchy law at best. But their masterpiece, their Moby Dick if you will, was the torture memo.

...

Tenet; But what about the Geneva Convention?
Dick: We believe the Geneva Convention is open to... interpretation.
Tenet: What exactly does that mean?
Addington: Stress positions, water boarding, confined spaces, dogs.
Rumsfeld: We’re calling it enhanced interrogation.
George W: We’re sure none of this fits under the definition of torture?
Addington: The U.S. doesn’t torture.
Cheney: Therefore, if the U.S. does it, by definition, it can’t be torture.

...

Narrator: But torture and privacy laws weren’t the only laws Cheney rewrote with John Yoo. They had a full menu of opinions challenging Constitutional and International law.


Classic "definitional logic".

Cue the metaphor:
A fancy waiter lists the specials to Cheney, Rumsfeld, Wolfowitz and Addington at a lavish table:
Waiter: Tonight we are offering the enemy combatant: whereby someone is not a criminal or a prisoner of war. Which gives them no protection under the law. We are also have Extreme Rendition where suspects are abducted without record, on foreign soil and taken to foreign prisons in countries that torture. We have Guantanamo Bay which is very, very complicated but allows you to operate outside the purview of due process on land that isn’t technically US soil, but is under our control.
Rumsfeld: That sounds delicious!
Waiter: And there is a very fresh and delicious War Powers Act interpretation, which gives the executive branch broad power to attack any country or person that might possibly be a threat. Finally for desert we have the fact that under the unitary executive theory if the President does anything it makes it legal. In other words you can do whatever the fuck you want. So which would you like gentlemen?
Dick: We’ll have them all.
Waiter: Excellent choice.

...

Wolfowitz: The American people know we’re at war but they don’t understand against who. Rumsfel: They want a country. It’s simpler. Cleaner.
Addington: That would certainly help us legally.
Dick: Looks like it’s time to take Iraq.

...

Dick: DICK It’s called the Office of Special Plans. Tenet is not yet serious enough about the threat Saddam poses in the GWOT, or global war on terror. But I can promise you this intelligence group will be.
George W: That's an excellent idea. I’ve been wanting to take that motherfucker Saddam down for a long time.


Time to cook the books.

Feith: I’ve got something! Here’s a report that Mohamed Atta one of the hijackers may have met with an Iraqi spy in Prague. It’s from Czech intelligence and they question its credibility...
Wolfowitz: I’ve been to Prague. They question everything. Who wants to be an “unnamed source?”
Feith:Make sure to get in the phrase “we don’t want the smoking gun to be a mushroom cloud.” It focus grouped through the roof!
[later on TV]
Rice: The problem with Saddam is that there will always be uncertainty about when he will acquire nuclear weapons. But we don’t want the smoking gun to be a mushroom cloud.

...

Dick [whispering to George W after Powell argues against invading Iraq]: Are you going to take Saddam down or not. You’re the President. War is yours. Not the U.N. Or some coalition. Do not share powers that are yours alone.
George W: George, make sure Powell sees the intelligence. Colin I want you to make that speech. I’m the President and I want this to happen!

...

Narrator: That classified document described a terrorist named Abu Musab Al- Zarqawi who had started as a drug dealer and pimp before becoming fully radicalized in a Jordanian prison. Zarqawi went to meet Bin Laden in Afghanistan. But Zarqawi had vowed to kill all Shia Muslims and Bin Laden's mother was Shia, so the meeting didn’t go well...After the US invaded Afghanistan Zarqawi set up shop in Iraq. It was the only connection Cheney had between Al Qaeda and Iraq, and Cheney made sure Zarqawi’s name was all over Powell’s speech.

...

Narrator: By the time we invaded Iraq 70% of Americans thought that Saddam Hussein was involved in 9/11. Later Colin Powell would call the speech the most shameful moment of his life.

...

George W: My fellow citizens, at this hour, American and coalition forces are in the early stages of military operations to disarm Iraq, to free its people and to defend the world from grave danger. On my orders, coalition forces have begun striking selected targets of military importance to undermine Saddam Hussein's ability to wage war. These are opening stages of what will be a broad and concerted campaign. To all of the men and women of the United States armed forces now in the Middle East, the peace of a troubled world and the hopes of an oppressed people now depend on you.


Next up: Mission accomplished.

George W: Ladies and Gentlemen...Major Combat operations in Iraq have ended. In the Battle of Iraq, the United States and our allies have prevailed.

...

General: We have concerns over Halliburton KBR’s billing practices. As you know, the no-bid contracts they received were quite sizable and now...
Rumsfeld: Well, we’re not concerned. Are we?
Dick: Not at all.
Wolfowitz: The Secretary of Defense and the Vice President just said they’re not concerned. Now can we please talk about Iran?

...

Dick: This Joe Wilson asshole is questioning our intelligence in the New York Times? What’s his wife’s name?
Libby: Valerie Plame. I confirmed it. She’s undercover CIA.
Dick: Leak it...

...

Narrator: Abu Musab Al-Zarqawi had taken his fame from Powell's UN speech and taken it into his own new thing. The Islamic state of Iraq and Levant, or ISIS. And because that intelligence somehow found itself on the bottom of a stack of papers, Zarqawi had a whole year to do whatever the hell he wanted. And what he wanted was carnage. Shia versus Sunni, the West versus Islam and death versus life. And on top of that US forces couldn't find any WMD's or nuclear programs in Iraq. Turns out that Saddam and his son's mostly liked cocaine and American movies from the 80's.

...

Leahy: Hey Dick. I hope there’s no hard feelings about us investigating the no-bid Iraq contracts for Halliburton. Just doing my job.
Dick: Go fuck yourself.

...

Rumsfeld [on phone]: Listen, if we can just get an air bombardment in Iraq, it’ll make a statement and give us political cover.
Dick: It’s over Don.
Rumsfeld: What’s that?
Dick: It’s over. The President wants you to step down. He appreciates your service.
Rumsfeld: Does Bush’s kid want me out or do you?
Dick: I can’t win every fight Don.
Rumsfeld: You are a little piece of shit. Wow, how did you become such a cold son of a bitch. Dick: I’m sorry Don. I really am.
Rumsfeld: You know how I know you’re not? Because I wouldn’t be.
[a long pause]
Rumsfeld: Do you think they’ll prosecute us?


Next up: the narrator.

Narrator [to the camera]: They say my heart could give him another ten years. Cheney doesn’t like to refer to it as someone else’s heart, he likes to refer to it as his new heart. And even though I’m dead, it still makes me feel pretty shitty.

...

Martha Raddatz: Two-thirds of Americans say the Iraq war is not worth fighting. And their looking at the value gained at the cost of American lives. And Iraqi lives.
Dick: So?
Martha: So...don’t you care what the American People think?
Dick: No..uh...I think you can’t be, uh, blown off course.
[he then turns to addrsss the camera]
Dick: I can feel your recriminations and your judgement. And I am fine with it. If you want to be loved, go be a movie star. The world is as you find it. And you gotta deal with that reality. And there are monsters in this world. We saw 3,000 innocent people burned to death, by those monsters. And yet, you object, when I refuse to kiss those monsters on the cheek and say, “pretty please.” You answer me this, What terrorist attack would you let go forward so you wouldn’t seem like a mean and nasty fella? I will not apologize for keeping your families safe. And I will not apologize for doing what needed to be done, so your loved ones can sleep peacefully at night. It has been my honor to be your servant. You chose me and I did what you asked.


Then the inevitable title cards:

In the years following the invasion of Iraq, Halliburton stock rose 500%.

The Bush-Cheney White House claimed to have lost 22 million emails, including millions that were written in the run up to the Iraq war.

It was found that there were “Blackout” periods, when there were no emails available from the office of Vice President Cheney.

The memos Yoo wrote on torture and warrantless surveillance give the President almost unlimited power under the unitary executive theory. These memos are in the Justice Department’s computers to this day. Any President can still cite them if he or she wishes.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

Start here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=176529
Then here: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=185296
And here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=194382
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iambiguous
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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Sat Apr 27, 2019 11:45 pm

You might be one of the greatest pianists in the world. But if you are black and you're playing in the Deep South, you're going to need access to the Green Book. Not to be confused with the infamous little black book...or Mao's little red book. It's green. But it's green because, well, it was written by Victor Hugo Green. And it's really all about being black and white in America "down there" before the Civil Rights movement really kicked into high gear.

Or, rather, "down there" in particular.

Here the black man -- Dr. Donald Shirley -- is the educated, cultured, sophisticated character while the white man - Frank "Tony Lip" Vallelonga -- is from a "deep-down-inside-the-belly-of-the- beast" working class community. He was a bouncer in a nightclub. The Copacabana. Interacting with any number of folks from "connected" families.

It was called "The Negro Motorist Green Book". It's function was to enlighten black folks as to where it was okay [safe] to go in any particular city or town. First "down there" but then eventually from coast to coast. North. South. East. West. And the whole point of the movie is to take these disparate characters through a set of experiences that manages to change both of them. One more so than the other. But you tell me which.

Above all else, it demonstrates how one's "sense of self" can be profoundly shaped and molded over time given new and different sets of circumstances.

Sound familiar?

This is a tale of how others expect you to behave in a certain way because from their point of view the stereotypes are actually true.

Based on a true story. But one that is interpreted from different points of view. Not unlike our reaction to reality itself.

IMDb

Upon the film's release, the Shirley family objected to the truthfulness of the film, claiming that Tony and Doc were not friends; that there "was an employer-employee relationship". In January, 2019, audio recordings of an interview with Don Shirley emerged, in which he stated, "I trusted him implicitly... You see... not only was [Tony] my driver, we never had an employer/employee relationship. You don't have time for that bullshit. My life is in this man's hands!... So you've got to be friendly with one another."

Nick Vallelonga pulled a fast one in hiring his real life family members to play the onscreen family members. He let Viggo Mortensen believe Peter Farrelly had cast them, but suggested to Farrelly that Viggo had vouched for them as actors. The two only figured out the truth a month into the press tour.

The real Tony Lip is best known for playing Carmine Lupertazzi on The Sopranos and has had roles in several Martin Scorsese movies.

Viggo Mortensen would play Tony Lip's Sopranos episodes in the background while getting ready in the morning, to get into his rhythms of speech and accent.

To interpret the members of the Vallelonga family, Peter Farrelly appealed to the Vallelonga themselves. Nick Vallelonga, who plays a mafia godfather in the film, also introduced the director to his father's friends. These add a touch of authenticity to the scenes of Copacabana, although many of them had never played comedy. Linda Cardellini also wore the bracelet and the ring that belonged to her character.


trivia at IMDb: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt6966692/tr ... tt_trv_trv
at wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_Book_(film)
trailer: https://youtu.be/QkZxoko_HC0

Green Book [2018]
Directed by Peter Farrelly

Lip: I, uh... I think I got the wrong address, but, uh, is there a doctor's office in here? A doctor's office? Dr. Shirley?
Woman [at Carnegie Hall]: You have the correct address. Dr. Shirley lives upstairs, above the Hall.

...

Lip: I thought, uh... I thought I was going to an office. They said a doctor needed a driver.
Donald: That's all they told you?
Lip: Yeah.
Donald: Actually, it's a bit more complicated than that.

...

Donald: Well, first of all, Tony, I'm not a medical doctor. I'm a musician.
Lip: You mean, like, songs?
Donald: Yes. And I'm about to embark on a concert tour, the majority of which will be down south.
Lip: Atlantic City.
Donald: No. The Deep South. First, we're starting in the Midwest, and then we're taking a hard left. Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee, and on down through the Delta. Do you foresee any issues in working for a black man?
Lip: No. No, no, no. It was just the other day, me and the wife had a couple of colored guys over at the house. For...for drinks.


Of course we know the gist of what really happened then.

Donald: But let me be crystal clear. I'm not just hiring a chauffeur. I need someone who can handle my itinerary. Be a personal assistant. I need a valet. I need someone who can launder my clothes and shine my shoes.
Lip [stands up, shakes his head and turns to leave]: Good luck, Doc.

...

Donald: Tony. I had my record label ask around town to find me the right man. Your name came up more than once. You've impressed several people with your...innate ability to handle trouble. And that is why I called and inquired about your availability.
Lip: Okay, here's the deal. I got no problem being on the road with you. But I ain't no butler. I ain't ironing no shirts, and I'm not polishing nobody's shoes. You need somebody to get you from point A to point B? You need someone to make sure there's no problems along the way? And believe me, you and the Deep South, there's gonna be problems. So, if you want me, it's a buck and a quarter a week. Or go hire that little Chink just pranced out of here. See how far you get.
Donald: Well, Mr. Vallelonga, thank you for stopping by.

...

Dee [Dolores, Lip's wife]: I'm dying to hear. What happened with the doctor interview?
Lip: He ain't a real doctor. He's a piano player.
Dee: Well, I don't understand. Why did they say that he was a doctor?
Lip: I don't know. I think he's, like, a doctor of, uh, piano playing or something.
Dee: You can be that?
Lip: I guess. He lives on top of Carnegie Hall. You should've seen this place, Dee. It was filled with statues and all kinds of fancy crap. And he was sitting on top of a friggin' throne all dressed up like, uh, like the king of the jungle bunnies.
Dee: He's colored? Well, you wouldn't last a week with him.
Lip: For the right money, I would.

...

Lip: What'd he say?
Dee [after talking to Donald on the phone]: He wanted to know if I'd be okay with him taking my husband away from his family for two months. He said he'd pay you what you asked for.
Lip: It's good money. We need it. I can't be eating 26 hot dogs every day.

...

Man [handing Lip a copy of the Green Book]: This is the book I was telling you about. Now, sometimes you guys are staying in the same hotel, sometimes you're not.

...

Dee's brother: So, what'd my sister have to say about you being gone for three weeks?
Lip: Eight weeks.
Brother: Ten to one, you slap this moolie out, you come home in under a month.

...

Dee: Did you go to the AAA for the maps?
Lip: Yes. No. I mean, the record companies gave me the maps and the itinerary, and this thing.
Dee: "The Negro Motorist's Green Book".
Lip: Yeah, it lists all the places coloreds can stay down south. Like a... you know, traveling while black.
Dee: "Traveling while black"?
Lip: Yeah, if you're black and you gotta travel, for some reason.
Dee: They got a special book for that?
Lip: I guess.

...

Lip: Hey, when I was in the Army, I knew a guy from Pittsburgh. Except he called it "Titsburgh." 'Cause he said all the women there had huge tits.
Donald: That's absurd. Why would women in Pittsburgh have larger breasts than, say, women in New York?
Lip: Guess we'll find out, huh?

...

Lip: Hey, you know, when you first hired me, my wife went out and bought one of your records. The one about the orphans.
Donald: Orphans?
Lip: Yeah. Cover had a bunch of kids sitting around a campfire.
Donald: Orpheus.
Lip: Yeah.
Donald: "Orpheus in the Underworld". It's based on a French opera. And those weren't children on the cover. Those were demons in the bowels of hell.
Lip: No shit? Must have been naughty kids.


Let's just say that color isn't the only gap between them. In his own way, Dr. Shirley can be equally insufferable.

Donald: One more thing. We'll be attending many events before and after the concerts. Interacting with some of the wealthiest and most highly educated people in the country. It is my feeling that your diction, however charming it may be in the tristate area, could use some... finessing.
Lip: Diction...like in what way?
Donald: Like in the only way the word is ever used. Your intonation, inflection, your choice of words.
Lip: Hey, I got my own problems. Now I gotta worry about what people think - about the way I talk?
Donald: There are simple techniques I can teach you that are quite effective. I can help you.
Lip: I...I don't need no goddamn help. People don't like the way I talk, they can go take a shit.
Donald: The profanity is another issue.
Lip: Why are you breaking my balls?
Donald: Because you can do better, Mr. Vallelonga. Which brings me to one more point. As the guest of honor, I'll be introduced when entering these intimate events. You will be introduced as well. In my humble opinion, "Vallelonga" may be difficult to pronounce. So I was thinking...Valle would be more appropriate. Tony Valle. Short and sweet.
Lip: Eh... nah. They got a problem with Vallelonga, they can call me Tony Lip.
Donald: These are genteel people. "Tony the Lip" may be a little... worldly for them.
Lip: Well, then it's Tony Vallelonga. All these high-class people, so much smarter than me, with their intelligence and speaking abilities, you're telling me they can't pronounce my name? They don't like it, they can shove it up their ass and I'll just wait outside.
Donald: A sound compromise.

...

Woman [introducing Donald]: Ladies and gentlemen, tonight we are privileged to present a great American artist. He gave his first public performance at the age of three. At age 18, at Arthur Fiedler's invitation, our guest made his concert debut with the Boston Pops. He holds doctorates in psychology, in music and in the liturgical arts. And he has performed at the White House twice in the past 14 months. He is a true virtuoso.

...

Donald: I've been looking for you.
Lip: Yeah, sorry. The guys were having a little game.
Donald: Next time you need extra money, just ask me.
Lip: It's more fun winning it.
Donald: And what if you lost?
Lip: Shooting craps and cards. I don't lose, Doc. I don't lose.
Donald: So stooping down in the gravel pitching dice for pocket change makes you a winner?
Lip: What are you giving me shit for? Everybody was doing it.
Donald: They didn't have a choice whether to be inside or out. You did.

...

Donald: So, where did this "Tony the Lip" moniker come from?
Lip: It's not Tony the Lip. It's Tony Lip. One word. I got it when I was kid, 'cause my friend said I was the best bullshit artist in the Bronx.
Donald: It doesn't bother you that your friends, the people closest to you, consider you a liar?
Lip: Who said "liar"? I said "bullshit artist."
Donald: And what's the difference?
Lip: 'Cause I don't lie. Ever. I'm just good at talking people into... you know, doing things they don't want to do. By bullshitting them.
Donald: And you're proud of that?
Lip: Well, it got me this job.

...

Lip [listening to Aretha Franklin on the car radio]: You know this song.
Donald: I don't think so, no.
Lip: How could you not know this music? Aretha Franklin. Chubby Checker, Little Richard, Sam Cooke. I mean, come on, Doc. These are your people.

...

Donald: I've never had fried chicken in my life.
Lip: Who you bullshitting? You people love the fried chicken, the grits and the collard greens. I love it, too. Negro cooks used to make it all the time when I was in the Army.
Donald: You have a very narrow assessment of me, Tony.
Lip: Yeah, right? I'm good.
Donald: No. No, you're not good. You're bad. I'm saying, just because other Negroes enjoy certain types of music, it doesn't mean I have to. Nor do we all eat the same kind of food.
Lip: Whoa. Wait a minute. If you said all guineas like pizza and spaghetti and meatballs, I'm not gonna get insulted.
Donald: You're missing the point. For you to make the assumption that every Negro...
Lip: Hey, you want some or not?

...

Lip: Honest to God, Doc, I don't understand you. You could have drunk here. You got a whole bottle.
Donald: I just needed some air.
Lip: Air? Do you know where you are?!
Donald: Does geography really matter?
Lip: What?
Donald: If I was in a bar in your neighborhood, would the conversation be any different?

...

Lip [after an "incident" back at the plantation]: Why don't I just pull over? You can piss in the woods.
Donald: Animals go in the woods.
Lip: It's gonna be at least 20 minutes, I gotta go all the way back to your motel.
Donald: So let's just get there so I can go back and finish the show.
Lip: See, that's the difference between you and me. I'd have zero problem going in the woods.
Donald: I'm well aware.
Lip: What are you sore at me for? I don't make the rules down here.
Donald: No? Then who does?
Lip: Oh. You're saying just 'cause I'm white and they're white? You know, that's a very prejudiced thing you just said there. A very prejudiced thing. I got more in common with the Hymies at 2nd Avenue Deli than I do with these hillbilly pricks down here.

...

Lip: How does he smile and shake their hands like that? They try to pull that outhouse shit on me, I'd piss right on the living room floor.
Oleg: Don't-don't do that. We have many concert dates left. You realize we're contractually obliged to perform them?
Lip: Course I do. You don't play, we don't get paid. What's your point?
Oleg: Ugly circumstances are going to happen again, so control yourself.
Lip: Don't lecture me, you rat.
Oleg: Dr. Shirley could have stayed up north, getting rear end kissed at Park Avenue parties for three times money. But he ask for this.
Lip: Why?


I'm wondering the same thing myself.

Lip [after Donald has dictated an eloquent letter for him to send to his wife]: So, can I put, uh... "P.S. Kiss the kids"?
Donald: A P.S.?
Lip: Yeah, like, at the end.
Donald: That's like clanging a cowbell at the end of Shostakovich's Seventh.
Lip: Right. And that's good?
Donald: It's perfect, Tony.

...

Donald: They were wrong for the way they treated me, and you rewarded them.
Lip: I was hired to get you from one show to the next. How I do it shouldn't matter to you.
Donald: I just wish you hadn't paid 'em off.
Lip: I did what I had to do. You know, if this got out, it would kill your career.
Donald: Okay, Tony. I need you to stop it with the phony altruism and concern for my career.
Lip: What the hell does that mean?
Donald: You were only thinking about yourself back there because you know, if I miss a show, it'll come out of your pocketbook.
Lip: Of course I don't want you to miss a show, you ungrateful bastard. You think I'm doing this for my health? Tonight, I saved your ass. So show a little appreciation, maybe.


Aside from being black in the Deep South, it turns out he's gay too.

Donald: Tony. I'm sorry about last night.
Lip: Don't worry about it. I've been working nightclubs in New York City my whole life. I know it's a... complicated world.

...

Lip: So, where'd you learn how to play like that?
Donald: My mother. She taught me how to play on an old spinet. Soon as I could walk, we'd... travel around the Florida Panhandle, put on my little shows in parishes and halls. Fortunately, a man who had seen me play arranged for me to study at the Leningrad Conservatory of Music. I was the first Negro ever accepted there.
Lip: That's where they taught you all them songs you play?
Donald: Actually, I was trained to play classical music. Brahms, Franz Liszt, Beethoven, Chopin. It's all I ever wanted to play. But I was persuaded by my record company to pursue a career in popular music instead. They insisted that audiences would never accept a Negro pianist on a classical stage. Wanted to turn me into just another colored entertainer. You know, the guy who's smoking while he's playing and sets a glass of whiskey on his piano, and then complains because he's not respected like Arthur Rubinstein. You don't see Arthur Rubinstein putting a glass of whiskey on his piano.
Lip: I don't know. Personally, I think, if you stuck to the classic stuff, it would've been a big mistake.
Donald: A mistake? Performing the music I trained my entire life to play?
Lip: Trained? What are you, a seal? People love what you do. Anyone could sound like Beethoven or... "Joe Pan" or them other guys you said, but your music, what you do... ...only you can do that.
Donald: Thank you, Tony. But not everyone can play Chopin. Not like I can.

...

White cop: How you say this last name?
Lip: Vallelonga.
Cop: Yeah, what kind of name is that?
Lip: It's Italian.
Cop: Oh. Oh, I see. That's why you're driving him around. You're half a nigger yourself.

...

Chief: Get 'em out.
Cop: What?
Chief: Cut 'em goddamn loose.
Cop: That dago wop hit me!
Chief: You want to keep your goddamn job? Then you do what I goddamn tell you to do when I goddamn tell you to do it! And I'm telling you to get 'em the goddamn out!
Lip [to Donald]: Who the hell did you call?


Bobby Kennedy as it turns out.

Donald: You shouldn't have hit the cop.
Lip: I didn't like the way he was treating you. Making you stand out in the rain like that.
Donald: Please, you hit him because of what he called you. I've had to endure that kind of talk my entire life. You should be able to take it for at least one night.
Lip: What? I can't get mad at that stuff he was saying 'cause I ain't black? Christ, I'm blacker than you are.
Donald: Excuse me?
Lip: You don't know shit about your own people. What they eat, how they talk, how they live. You don't even know who Little Richard is.
Donald: Oh, so knowing who Little Richard is makes you blacker than me? Oh, Tony, I wish you could hear yourself sometimes. You wouldn't talk so damn much.
Lip: Bullshit. I know exactly who I am. I'm the guy who lived in the same neighborhood in the Bronx my entire life with my mother, my father, my brother, and now my wife and kids. That's it. That's who I am. I'm the asshole who has to hustle every goddamn day to put food on the table. You, Mr. Big Shot, you live on top of a castle, traveling around the world doing concerts for rich people. I live on the streets. You sit on a throne. So yeah, my world is way more blacker than yours.

...

Donald: Yes, I live in a castle, Tony! Alone. And rich white people pay me to play piano for them because it makes them feel cultured. But as soon as I step off that stage, I go right back to being just another nigger to them. Because that is their true culture. And I suffer that slight alone, because I'm not accepted by my own people 'cause I'm not like them, either. So, if I'm not black enough and if I'm not white enough and if I'm not man enough, then tell me, Tony, what am I?

...

Oleg: Is Dr. Shirley in his dressing room?
Lip: Yeah. More like half a broom closet. Tell you, I don't know how he puts up with that shit.
Oleg: Six years ago, in 1956, Nat King Cole was invited to perform at the Municipal Auditorium here in Birmingham. Mr. Cole was the first Negro asked to play at a white establishment in this city. As soon as he started playing, a group of men attack him for playing white people's music. They pull him off stage and beat him badly.
Lip: Jesus Christ.
Oleg: You asked me once why Dr. Shirley does this. I tell you. Because genius is not enough. It takes courage to change people's hearts.

...

Lip: This guy's saying Dr. Shirley can't eat here.
Manager: Oh, well, I apologize, but... these are long-standing traditions, club rules. I'm sure you understand.
Donald: No, I do not understand. In 45 minutes, I will be right up there on that stage entertaining your guests, yet I can't eat here?
Manager: I'm sorry.
Lip: Wait a minute. Are you telling me the bozos in his band and all these people who came here to see him play, they can eat here, but the star of the show, the-the parking spot of honor, he can't?
Manager: I'm afraid not.

...

Manager [taking Lip aside]: Mr. Villanueva, you have to talk sense to Mr. Shirley. Please make him understand. We're not insulting him personally. This is just the way things are done down here.
Lip: Yeah, well, he's not from down here.
Manager: Yeah, just-just ask him to be reasonable. I got 400 guests in there expecting to be entertained tonight.
Lip: And Dr. Shirley expects to eat tonight. Why can't you just make an exception this one time?
Manager: Let me tell you a story. You ever hear of the Boston Celtics basketball club? Well... those boys came through here couple years ago on a barnstorming tour, and... seeing as they was the world champions of the league and all, we were tickled to have them here, and we rolled out the welcome wagon. So, do you know what table their big coon ate at that night?
Lip: No.
Manager: I don't, either, but it wasn't one of ours. Now, let's cut the bullshit. Tell me what it's gonna take, huh? Say, uh, a hundred dollars, you get your boy to play?
Lip: You think you can buy me?
Manager: With all due respect, sir, you wouldn't be in a job like this if you couldn't be bought.

...

Lip [to Donald]: Don't ever flash your wad of cash in a bar.

...

Donald [to Lip]: I knew you had a gun.

...

Donald: Thank you for sharing your husband with me.
Dee: Thank you for helping him with the letters.

...

Title card: Dr. Donald Shirley continued to tour, compose and record to great acclaim. Igor Stravinsky said of him, "His virtuosity is worthy of the Gods".

Frank "Tony Lip" Vallelonga went back to his job at the Copacabana, eventually becoming the maître d.

Tony Lip and Dr. Donald Shirley remained friends until they died within months of each other in 2013.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Sat May 04, 2019 11:48 pm

When it comes to issues like homosexuality, there are three kinds of people:

1] those who accept it
2] those who reject it
3] those who accept it...but only on their terms

Thus some of the most ferocious battles can occur within the homosexual community itself. Arguments over which behaviors come closest to encompassing how those who wish to construe themselves as "one of us" are obligated to embrace.

In the same vein, which portrayals of homosexuality in film come closest to getting it right?

Did Bohemian Rhapsody do justice to Freddie Mercury? Did Freddie Mercury himself do justice to the gay cause? Or did the movie skew the truth such that [as some insist] it should never have been made at all. Or, as the song itself asks, "is this the real life, is this just fantasy?"

So, the problem here isn't just getting the facts down right, but interpreting those facts so as to be included in the right rendition of "one of us". Which means that this is either more or less important to you. And, however important it might be, how much information and knowledge do any of us have to make our own reaction among the more sophisticated?

Freddie Mercury was said to have "defied all of the stereotypes". But for some [both accepting of and rejecting homosexuality] those stereotypes can be more or less important in shaping their own sense of "the true story". We can only end up taking out of Freddie Mercury that which we are able to put into him: ourselves.

And [of course] all the usual stuff about being a dedicated musician -- a serious artist -- in an industry bent only on turning music into a saleable commodity; and all the "boys in the band" calamities precipitating any number of contentions as they rise to the top and have to deal with all the consequences of newfound wealth and fame.

And then [eventually] hovering over everthing is AIDS.

IMDb

For his role as Freddie Mercury, Rami Malek was fitted with special prosthetic teeth to recreate Freddie's prominent overbite. After filming wrapped, Rami kept the teeth as a memento from the shoot, eventually having them cast in gold.

On The Late Show with Stephen Colbert: Mike Myers/Christiane Amanpour (2018), Mike Myers said that during the making of Wayne's World (1992), he insisted that the song he and his friends listen to while driving would be "Bohemian Rhapsody". The producers felt it wouldn't be appropriate. Myers stood his ground, eventually threatening to quit the movie. Myers got his way, the movie became a huge hit, and the song reentered the charts, peaking at at #2 in the United States. The movie was credited for introducing Queen to a new audience. Myers also said that when he was offered a chance to appear in this movie, he accepted immediately without bothering to read the script.

In a 1985 interview, Freddie Mercury famously said, "The only friend I've got is Mary, and I don't want anybody else. To me, she was my common-law wife. To me, it was a marriage. We believe in each other, that's enough for me."

Though Freddie Mercury stayed in touch with his family throughout his rise to fame, he never disclosed his sexuality to his parents, whose Zoroastrian religion deemed homosexuality a mode of demon worship.

Sacha Baron Cohen was the original choice to play Freddie Mercury, with Stephen Frears to direct.

According to BBC, film production was rough. The film's producers and lead star, Rami Malek, had grown tired of director Bryan Singer's erratic behavior, which saw him routinely showing up late to set or disappearing altogether.

Freddie Mercury's speech about not wanting to be pitied is based on real events. In reality, some years after the Live Aid, the band had sat together and were casually chatting about daily stuff. Freddie Mercury jokingly said "You guys think you have problems" and pulled up his pants, showing them a scar that had formed in his lower leg. He then went on to tell the band (much like depicted in the film) about his disease, and how he sternly refused to be pitied, and that he wanted to spend the rest of his time making music. He also asked them to keep it a secret, and although many people suspected it in his final year due to his extreme weight loss, he didn't publicly announce it until one day before his death.

The film had a mixed critical reception; the direction, screenplay, and historical inaccuracies were criticized; however, Rami Malek's performance as Freddie Mercury received unanimous praise.


trivia at IMDb: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1727824/tr ... tt_trv_trv
FAQs at IMDb: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1727824/faq?ref_=tt_faq_sm
at wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bohemian_Rhapsody_(film)
trailer: https://youtu.be/mP0VHJYFOAU

Bohemian Rhapsody [2018]
Directed by Bryan Singer

Father: Out again, Farrokh?
Freddie: It's Freddie now, Papa.
Father: Freddie or Farrokh...what difference does it make when you're out every night...no thought of the future in your head? Good thoughts, good words, good deeds. That's what you should aspire to.
Freddie: Yes. And how's that worked out for you?

...

Freddie: Also, um, I write songs. Might be of interest to you. It's just a bit of fun, really.
Roger [from the band Smile]: Well, you're five minutes too late. Our lead singer just quit.
Freddie: Well, then you'll need someone new.
Roger: Any ideas?
Freddie: What about me?
Roger: Uh, not with those teeth, mate.


Freddie turns to walk away, stops, turns back and starts to sing.

Freddie: I was born with four additional incisors. More space in my mouth means more range. I'll consider your offer.
Roger: Uh, do you play bass?
Freddie: Nope.

...

Mary: So, you found me, then. How can I help you?
Freddie: Oh. Um, I rather liked these. Do you think you have them in my size?
Mary: This is the ladies' section, so I'm not exactly sure.

...

Freddie: Trouble is, we're just not thinking big enough.
Roger: What have you got in mind, Fred?
Freddie: An album.
Roger: We can't afford an album.
Freddie: Oh, we'll find a way. How much do you think we can get for this van?
Roger: I hope you're joking.

...

A&R man: Oi, RT, who are these kids in the box?
RT: A student band doing some weird stuff.
A&R man: How about demos? You got some?

...

Mary: So the new name is Queen?
Freddie: As in "Her Royal Highness." And because it's outrageous...and I can't think of anyone more outrageous than me.

...

Freddie: Please tell your father it's nice to meet him.
Mary: I have.
Freddie: Then thank him for the lovely birthday cake.
Mary: I have.
Freddie: Then tell him his daughter's an epic shag.
Mary [whose father is deaf]: Freddie, he can read lips.

...

Father: Mercury?
Freddie: No looking back. Only forward.
Father: So now the family name's not good enough for you?
Mother: It's just a stage name.
Freddie: No, it's not. I changed it legally. Got a new passport and everything.

...

Father: I sent Farrokh away to make a good Parsee boy of him. He was too wild and unruly. But what good did it do? Good thoughts, good words, good deeds. You can't get anywhere pretending to be someone you're not.

...

Freddie [to the band and his family after getting off the phone]: I have an announcement. One of the A&R men...from EMI saw us recording. Gave our demo to John Reid. He looks after Elton John. Oh, my God. Mr. Reid wants to meet us...and possibly, even manage us.

...

Reid: So, this is Queen. And you must be Freddie Mercury. You've got a gift. You all have. So tell me... what makes Queen any different from all the other wannabe rock stars I meet?
Freddie: I'll tell you what it is. We're four misfits who don't belong together, playing to the other misfits. The outcasts right at the back of the room...who are pretty sure they don't belong either. We belong to them.

...

Mary: What was it like singing for all those people?
Freddie: When I know they're listening...when I know I really have them...I couldn't sing off-key if I tried. I'm exactly the person I was always meant to be. I'm not afraid of anything. The only other time I ever feel that way is when I'm with you.

...

EMI exec: : Look...we just really need something special. More hits...like Killer Queen...only bigger.
Roger: It's not bloody widgets we're making. We can't just reproduce Killer Queen.
Freddie: No. We can do better.
[he plays a record]
Freddie: It's opera. Opera! Opera!
Roger: See, we don't want to repeat ourselves. The same formula over and over. Formulas are a complete and utter waste of time.
Beach: Formulas work. Let's stick with the formulas. I like formulas.
Freddie: We'll call the album...A Night at the Opera.
EMI exec: Are you aware that no one actually likes opera?
Freddie: No, don't misunderstand, darling. It's a rock and roll record...with the scale of opera... the pathos of Greek tragedy... the wit of Shakespeare...the unbridled joy of musical theater. It's a musical experience. Rather than just another record. Something for everyone... something... Hmm. Something that will make people feel belongs to them. We'll mix genres, we'll cross boundaries...we'll speak in bloody tongues if we want to.

...

Paul [after Freddie sings a new song]: Hmm. It's beautiful. What's it called?
Freddie: Love of My Life. I wrote it for Mary.
Paul: If you say so.

...

Freddie [after Paul kisses him]: Don't misunderstand, Paul. Mary knows me in a way that no one else ever will.
Paul: I know you, Freddie Mercury.
Freddie: Is that what you think? Oh, no, you don't know me. You just see what you want to see. We work together. That's all.

...

Freddie [in the studio]: Oh, and then there's the operatic section. You're gonna love it.

...

Ray [after hearing Bohemian Rhapsody]: I'm not entirely sure...that's the album you promised us.
Freddie: No, it's better than the album we promised you. It's better than any album anyone's ever promised you, darling. It's a bloody masterpiece.
John: It is a good album, Ray.
Freddie: We prefer "masterpiece."
Ray: It's expensive, and as for... "Bohemian..."
Band member: Rhapsody.
Ray: Rhapsody. What is that?
Freddie: It's an epic poem.
Ray: It goes on forever. Six bloody minutes.
Freddie: And do you know what? We're going to release it as our single.
Ray: Not possible. Anything over three minutes... and the radio stations won't program it, period. And what on earth is it about, anyway? Scaramouche? Galileo? And all that "Ismillah" business! "Ishmillah"?
Freddie: Bismillah.
Ray: Oh, aye. Bismillah. What's it about, anyway? Bloody Bismillah?
Freddie: True poetry is for the listener. It ruins the mystery if everything's explained.

...

Ray: Look, I'm not arguing Bohemian whatever's...musicianship. But there's no way in hell the station will play a 6-minute quasi-operatic dirge comprised of nonsense words! Bismillah? Bullshit! I paid for this record, so I say what goes!



Brian: Have we no legal recourse on this?
Reid: Legally, no. No, he's got all your balls in a vice. It's a different matter in the court of public opinion, of course. Ray Foster's a giant name in the music industry, but...to the average person... say the name Queen, on the other hand...ears prick up.
Ray: We're going with You're My Best Friend. Done.
Freddie [turning to walk out the door]: No. We know what we have, even if you don't. It's called Bohemian Rhapsody. And you will forever be known as the man who lost Queen.

...

Paul [to Mary watching Freddie on stage]: How much do they love him? Can't get enough.

...

Freddie [watching himself on TV]: They're all singing. Thousands of them. All singing to you. Because it's true.
Mary: Freddie, what's wrong? Something's been wrong for a while now. Say it. Say it.
Freddie: I've been thinking about it a lot. I think I'm bisexual.
Mary: Freddie, you're gay. I've known for a while now. I just didn't want to admit it. It's funny, really. This is what I always settle for. "I love you, but..." "I love you, Mary, but I need space." "I love you, Mary, but I've met someone else." And now, "I love you, but I'm..." And this is the hardest, because it's not even your fault...What do you want from me?
Freddie: Almost everything. I want you in my life.
Mary: Why?
Freddie: We believe in each other. And that's everything. For us.
Mary: Your life is going to be very difficult.
[she walks out of the room]

...

Paul [on phone]: Freddie?
Freddie: Sweetheart, I want to throw a party.
Paul: Okay. Who do you want to invite?
Freddie: People. I want you to shake the freak tree and invite anyone who plops to the ground. Dwarfs and giants...magicians, Zulu tribesmen, contortionists...fire eaters...and priests. We're going to need to confess.

...

Brian: Hmm. You're starting to look like each other.
Paul: What's wrong with that, Brian?
Brian: You're supposed to be in a rock band, Freddie. Not the Village People.

...

Jim: So, all your friends have left you alone.
Freddie: They're not my friends. Not really. Just distractions.
Jim: From what?
Freddie: The in-between moments, I suppose. I find them intolerable. All of the darkness you thought you left behind comes creeping back in.
Jim: I know what you mean.
Freddie: Really? What is it that you do with them?
Jim: Spend them with real friends. You look like you could use a friend.
Freddie: I like you.
Jim: I like you, too, Freddie. Come and find me when you decide you like yourself.

...

Reid: Do you know who sold 4% of all the records purchased last year? Worldwide? Michael Jackson. Not the Jackson 5. Michael Jackson. And I think you could do even better. In fact, I've had an offer from CBS Records. It's a lot of money for you, Fred, and I think you should consider it.
Freddie: Are you asking me to break up the band?
Reid: I'm just pointing out what awaits you if you go solo. An end to your frustrations.
Freddie: My frustrations?
Reid [turning to Paul]: Paul?
Paul: I don't know what you're talking about, John.
Reid: Perhaps I misunderstood.
Freddie [to the driver]: Pull over. Stop the car, pull over.
Freddie [to Reid] Get out. Out now! Get out of this car. You're fired.
Reid: What're you talking about, fired?
Freddie: I said get out. Out! Out or I'll kill you! Get out, you treacherous piss flap.
Reid: You're not thinking clearly.
Freddie: Get your ass out of my car now. Get out! Out! Get your ass out of my car! Get out!
Reid: You're firing the wrong snake, Freddie. You'll regret it.

...

Freddie: Did you know anything about this?
Paul: I warned him against it. Pure greed.
Freddie: Tried to break up my family.
Paul: We can manage the band. We don't need him.
Freddie: What do you know about what I need?
Paul: I know what it's like...not to belong. A queer Catholic boy from Belfast. You know...I think my father would rather see me dead than let me be who I am. I'm gonna take care of you now, Freddie. If you'll let me.

...

Freddie: I'm tired of the bloody anthems. I want the energy in the clubs. The bodies, I want to make people move.
Roger: You mean disco?
Paul: Why not?
Roger: Do you mind pissing off? This is a band discussion.
Roger: Drum loops? Synthesizers? It's not us!
Freddie: Us?
Roger: It's not Queen!
Freddie: Queen is whatever I say it is!

...

Reporter: In your song Life Is Real, what do you mean by the line... "Love is a roulette wheel"? Are you implying that the more partners you have... the more chances you have of... contracting something?
Freddie: What? I don't know, I haven't figured out love yet.
Reporter: But it implies something else, Freddie.
Freddie: That might be a better question for Rog.
Roger: Watch it.

...

Reporter: Freddie, could you tell us about the rumors concerning your sexuality?
Freddie: What about the rumors concerning your lack of sexuality? I'm just a musical prostitute, my dear.
Reporter: Can you answer the question?
Freddie: What's your name, dear?
Reporter: Shelley Stern.
Freddie: Shelley.
Reporter: Yes.
Freddie: That thing between your legs, does it bite?
Reporter: Could you answer the question, please? What are you afraid of, Freddie?
Freddie: What do you want? What is the truth?

...

Freddie: I'm tired of touring. Aren't you? Album, tour, album, tour. I want to do something different.
Brian: We're a band. That's what bands do. Album, tour, album, tour.
Freddie: Well, I need a break. I'm sick of it.
Roger: What are you saying, Freddie?
Freddie: I've signed a deal with CBS Records.
Roger: You've done what? Without telling us? What kind of deal?
Freddie: Look, I'm not saying we won't record or ever tour again. Queen will go on. But I need to do something different. Do you know what I mean? I need to grow.

...

Roger: How much? What did they pay you? I wanna know how much they paid you...
Freddie: $4 million!
Roger: That's more than any Queen deal.
Freddie: Look, the routine is killing us. I mean, you must all want a break from all the arguments. I mean, whose song gets on the album... whose song's the single... who wrote what... who gets a bigger slice of the royalties... what's on the B-side, all of it. You must need a break.
Brian: Freddie, we're a family.
Freddie: No, we're not! We're not a family! You've got families, children, wives. What have I got?
Roger: You've got $4 million. Perhaps you can buy yourself a family.

...

Freddie: I won't compromise my vision any longer.
Roger: Compromise? Are you joking? You were working at Heathrow before we gave you a chance.
Freddie: And without me...you'd be a dentist...drumming 12/8-time blues at the weekend at the Crown and Anchor. And you. Well, you would be Dr. Brian May... author of a fascinating dissertation on the cosmos...that no one ever reads. And Deacy...for the life of me...nothing comes to mind.
Deacy: I studied electrical engineering.

...

Mary: Freddie, you're burning the candle at both ends.
Freddie: Yes, but the glow is so divine.
[Mary looks over at a table cluttered with booze and drug paraphernalia]
Freddie: Being human is a condition that requires a little anesthesia.

...

Freddie: I'm frightened.
Mary: Freddie, you don't need to be. Because no matter what, you are loved. By me, by Brian, Deacy, Roger... your family. It's enough.
[she looks over towards the house]
Mary: And these people...they don't care about you. Paul doesn't care about you. You don't belong here, Freddie. Come home.

...

Freddie [after Mary is gone]: Why didn't you tell me about Live Aid?
Paul: The Africa charity gig? It'll be an embarrassment. I didn't wanna waste your time.
Freddie: You're out.
Paul: What do you mean?
Freddie: I want you out of my life.

...

Paul: So I'm out? Just like that? After everything we've been through? Just think of the photos I have. I know who you are, Freddie Mercury.
Freddie: You know when you know you've gone rotten? Really rotten? Fruit flies. Dirty little fruit flies. Coming to feast on what's left. Well, there isn't much left for you to feast on anymore. So, fly off. Do what you like with your photographs and your stories. But promise me one thing. That I never see your face again. Ever.

...

Reporter [on TV interviewing Paul while Freddie watches]: And so, Mr. Prenter... all these stories about Freddie Mercury and his lovers...that there were so many. Is it really true?
Paul: Yes, it is. His lovers were countless. Genuinely countless. Uh...All these wild, drug-fueled parties... where he'd find another lover every night...and a routine he couldn't get out of.
Reporter: So, you really did see behind the mask?
Paul: I knew Freddie when he did Bohemian Rhapsody. And the Freddie we have now... he doesn't have the same passion about music.

...

Jim [of the band members]: They'll be all right. They just need a bit of time.
Freddie: What if I don't have time?
Jim: What do you mean, Fred?

...

Jim: Bob Geldof. I called to convince him to squeeze you guys into the lineup for the Live Aid concert...but he wants an answer now. You have to make a decision. Every ticket's already sold. 100,000 people at Wembley... 100,000 people at JFK Stadium in Philadelphia... a global TV audience around the world of 150 countries...13 satellites. The Olympics only had three.
Roger: We haven't played together in years. It's kinda suicide to play again...for the first time in front of millions.
Brian: Try over 1.5 billion. "Who are these four dinosaurs?" "Where's Madonna?"
Jim: It's a 20-minute set. Everyone gets the same. Jagger, Bowie...Elton...McCartney, The Who... Led Zeppelin... Phil Collins, REO Speedwagon... Bob Dylan. Anybody who is anybody is doing this concert.
Freddie: Look. All I know is that if we wake up the day after this concert and we didn't do our part...we're going to regret it till the day we die. Please.

...

Freddie: Before you leave...Could I have a second?
Roger: Yeah. What's up?
Freddie: I've got it.
Roger: Got what?
Freddie: AIDS. I wanted you to hear it from me.
Brian: Fred, I'm so sorry.
Freddie: Brian, stop. Don't. For right now...it's between us. All right? Just us. So, please if any of you fuss about it or frown about it, or, worst of all if you bore me with your sympathy... that's just seconds wasted. Seconds that could be used making music...which is all I want to do with the time I have left.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Sat May 11, 2019 11:29 pm

When most think of the crack epidemic back in the eighties, they think of black communities rived and ravished from within. And when most think of Detroit back then they think of an automobile industry being pummelled by "foreign imports". Plants closing down left and right. Good paying union jobs going down the drain in the brand spanking new "global economy".

On the other hand, not many will connect the dots between them. As Detroit becomes part of the "rust belt" and those union jobs available to working class folks without a college education begin to dwindle more and more, of course drugs are going to be seen as a viable alternative. For the folks that use them and for the folks that sell them...that push them.

Only this is the "based on a true story" tale of a white man and his white son becoming entangled in almost every imaginable facet of this crack epidemic. As for Rick, he might be in a crowd of over a hundred people and he's the only white dude around.

Then the "politics" of it all. Nancy Reagan imploring these rust belt folks -- the kids in particular -- to "just say no" to drugs. And law enforcement making a clear distinction between the cocaine that white folks snort and the crack rocks more widely available to those folks of color on the other side of the class divide.

We see all of this -- the good, the bad, the ugly -- unfolding from both sides of the law.

One of those films in which most of us don't have a clue as to what it must have been like growing up on the "poor side of town" amidst a drug epidemic in a major post-modern American metropolis...yet still confident that we can judge these folks with the utmost clarity and conviction.

IMDb

Though he's never seen in the film, a Detroit Police officer, named Gil Hill, is mentioned a couple of times during the course of the events leading up to the trial. This was the same Gil Hill who would become famous as Inspector Todd, Axel Foley's boss in the Beverly Hills Cop movies. Following his retirement from the Detroit Police Department, he went into politics as a Detroit City Councilman, and later, President of the Detroit City Council. During his time as a police officer, he was involved in the "White Boy Rick" case.

Richie Merritt had apparently never heard of Matthew McConaughey and was oblivious to his A-list celebrity status when he agreed to do the film.


trivia at IMDb: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt4537896/tr ... tt_trv_trv
at wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Boy_Rick
trailer: https://youtu.be/qns48PtK2io

White Boy Rick [2018]
Directed by Yann Demange

Rick: How come we stayed, Dad? Detroit. You always saying it's a shithole.
Richard: Son, lions don't leave the Serengeti. Besides, this is gonna be our year, I can feel it. You know, people like to piss on this country, but America is the only place in the goddamn world where a man can hot-wire his brains to his balls and make shit happen. All's he got to have is vision.
Rick: Vision?
Richard: Yeah.
Rick: Man needs a fucking pair of glasses. He wired his brains to his balls?
Richard: It's a, uh, metaphor, Rick.
Rick: Fuck is that?

...

Richard: Dawn, put on your clothes. We're going out. You, me and Ricky, we're gonna get frozen custard.
[Dawn -- his junkie daughter -- laughs]
Richard: What's so funny?
Dawen: Why the fuck would I do that?
Richard: Why'd you do that? 'Cause you're my daughter, that's why. And we're a family, and that's what families do!

...

Ray [Richard's father to his wife]: "Golden Fleece"? Will you tell me what the fuck that means?!

...

Rick: Silencers for the fake AKs? Why you waste your time on them?
Richard: Say, you pull through the drive-through and you order a burger, right? Little girl in the paper hat, first thing she says to you is, "Do you want fries with that?" Now, you didn't pull in wanting fries, but now that she's planted the idea in your head, you think, "Well, God damn! A burger just don't taste right without fries, right?" The next thing you know, you find yourself handing out your hard-earned dollars to buy some fries that the little girl in the paper hat ordered for you. Now, what'd she just do to you? She just upsold your ass. So, you see, the burger is like the AK. But the silencer, that's the fries. All's we got to do, is make them believe that they can't have one without the other.

...

Rick: Dawn. What's going on?
Dawn: I'm leaving. Here's the number, in case you need it. Don't go giving it to Dad.
Rick: It's Ty's, isn't it? Ty ain't got shit, Dawn. You know he's a fucking lowlife.
Dawn: What do you think Dad is, Ricky?

...

Johnny: Let's see the guns.
[Rick shows them the fake AKs]
Johnny: How much?
Rick: $100. Both.
Johnny: Boo'll hit you off.
Rick: You want some fries with that?

...

Richard: Yeah. So? I got my FFL. I'm legit.
Agent Byrd: You might have a license to sell firearms, Rick, but I think we can both agree that you're not legit.
Richard: Frank, I've never sold an unregistered weapon to anybody. Not knowingly. And I've got papers on every piece to prove it.
Agent Snyder: You got the papers on the silencers?

...

Byrd: Ricky, you know who the first lady of the United States is, right? You know what she says about drugs?
Rick: "Just say no."
Byrd: That's right. Problem is we got too many people saying yes. Especially on the East Side.

...

Snyder: Ricky, we just want to show you something, okay?
Rick: Man, what's up with you people and photographs? I supposed to know who this is?
Snyder: He was shot twice in the back of the head.
Rick: Think that's news on the East Side?
Byrd: We haven't found the killer yet, but we did find the weapon. .40 caliber. This particular weapon was purchased at a gun show earlier this year. By a licensed dealer. Your father is a businessman, who happens to have some clients that are total fucking scumbags. But the good news is the only people who know about this problem are sitting in this vehicle.


A CI is born...

Snyder [after Rick cocks a gun]: Whoa, whoa, whoa! Shit! Hey! No firearms.
Rick: You all got 'em.
Jackson: Yeah, 'cause I'm the motherfucking PD and they're the motherfucking FBI, you little motherfucker.
Rick: Then why don't the motherfucking PD and the motherfucking FBI walk they asses down there?
Byrd: We got your back, Rick.
Rick: Blow me.

...

Brenda: I thought you was dead. I mean, that's the way it mostly be when somebody stop coming to school, dead, in jail.
Rick: I just been busy.
Brenda: What you been busy with, Ricky?

...

Jackson [tossing Rick a bag of dope]: There's one other thing.
Rick: What is this?
Jackson: Consider it a bonus.
Rick: Dude, my dad finds this, he'll kick my ass.
Jackson: Just make sure he doesn't find it, then. A new jack like your ass is buying and you ain't pushing, word gets around.
Rick: First y'all got me buying, now y'all got me selling?

...

Jackson [to Rick in a voiceover]: Break it down to dime rocks. Get yourself a crew and offload it. Before long, people'll know you legit. You legit, you're safe.

...

Richard: Those motherfuckers came to you behind my back, Ricky?
Rick: What?
Richard: I saw you in the car. And you went along with it? You're my son.
Rick: They was gonna put your ass in jail.
Richard: Then let 'em put my ass in jail!

...

Rick: That's my box. You been going through my shit?
Richard: Yeah, I've been going through your shit. You know how much goddamn money's in that box? $9,782. Now, how's a goddamn 15-year-old boy have $9,782 without his goddamn dad knowing about it?
Rick: You know, you ought to be fucking thanking me!
[richard slaps him hard]
Rick: Man, fuck it! Keep the money! You need it more than I do! Use it to go open up your fucking movie store! Dawn's right! You're a fucking loser!

...

Dawn [to Rick after they're both handcuffed by the cops]: Good seein' ya lttle bro.

...

Johnny: What they charge you with, Rick?
Rick: Attempted murder. Some bullshit. I don't know.
Johnny: You don't know? You say that shit like you ain't even tripping. You good, Rick, at talking like a nigga, but you don't know the first thing it is to live like one. What you tell 'em, Rick?
Rick: I didn't tell 'em nothing, Johnny. For real. I mean, the motherfucker stole my grandpa's car, and I was just trying to stop him from getting away.
Johnny: You think one of us shoot up your granddaddy's car, they let us walk? Hmm? If I find out you got Boo mixed up in this, Rick, I will personally correct your ass. You understand?
Rick: Mixed up in what?
Johnny: We know, Rick. Nobody last 10 years in the game without knowing fuck all going on. We know. You cop from our houses, and then you out there grinding on your own. You ain't think we was gonna find out?
Rick: I'm sorry, Johnny. I had no idea they were your houses.
Johnny: 650 grams, Rick. That's all it take to land your ass, my ass, and all your buddies out there on the inside for the rest of our lives. Shit, you better off murdering somebody in the state of Michigan. So if you holding even one fucking gram, you don't come anywhere near me or mine, you understand? They haul your ass, you doing white time. They haul any of our asses, we doing black time. So don't be reckless around here. You want to move weight? Come to me. From now on, stay away from the houses. Feds always be watching the houses. You understand?
Rick: Yeah.

...

Richard; These guys you're hanging around with, you're gonna get in too deep. And then they ain't gonna let you out.
Rick: Who, Dad? The Currys or the cops?

...

Johnny [to the crew]: You know how much fucking heat this gonna bring? This just ain't no pile of shit you can kick in the woods. This is a fucking child. You know what that mean? It means somebody black ass going down for this whether they did it or not. They just want a nigga. Don't matter if it's the right nigga. They just want a nigga. And guess what nigga it ain't gonna be. It ain't gonna be me or any of my goddamn family! Leon wasn't even in the motherfucking house!

...

Byrd: Hey, Ricky. Something wrong?
Rick: Are you fucking kidding me?
Byrd: We need to talk about that little boy, Ricky.
Rick: What, are you trying to get me fucking killed? What's the matter with you people? I'm done!

...

Nugg [pulling out a gun and shooting Rick in the stomach]: I'm sorry, dude.

...

Richard [watching Rick being operated on]: That's my son? What the fuck happened to him?
Snyder: They say he's gonna make it.
Richard: Who fucking did this?
Snyder: We think one of Curry's crew.
Richard: I'm gonna kill him. I'm gonna track him down and put a bullet through his scumbag fucking skull.
Byrd: You got to be careful what you say in front of us, Rick.
Richard: Fuck you, Frank. You don't think I got a bullet for you too?
Snyder: Whoa, whoa, whoa! -Hey, hey, wait, man.
Richard: You, too, you fucking bitch.
Snyder: Rick, we're not your enemy.
Richard: You're responsible for this. For the 15-year-old boy in there.
Snyder: We've got enough to bring the Currys in now, Rick.

...

Dawn: What you into, Ricky? They got you listed under "John Doe." Who wants you dead so bad?

...

Snyder [at the hospital]: Who did this to you, Ricky? Was it Steve? Nugg? Was it Boo?
Rick: Boo would've never done this.
Snyder: Okay. It doesn't really matter who pulled the trigger, because we both know who put the gun in their hands. Johnny knows we have an informant. But it's all worked out for the best, Ricky. We raided one of the houses you were buying from. His crew flipped on him and sold him out...What happened to you could just complicate things. It's better if this never happened. You understand what I'm saying? Just like it's better if we forget about that little hobby of your dad's down in the basement.

...

Richard: Here, straight talk? Your mother and I, we... We didn't plan on having Dawn. I mean, to be honest, we didn't plan on having you, either. But in the end, things worked out.
Rick: Dad, your daughter is a junkie, and I'm shitting into a bag.

...

Rick: Things aren't gonna get better, Dad. You happy with this? You happy with who you are? Don't be thinking what the right answer is. There's only one right answer. You know how we can change this.
Richard: No. No drugs, God damn it. No drugs. They're poison, Ricky. They kill people. No fucking way.
Rick: What the fuck do you think you're selling? Water pistols?
Richard: Ricky, guns are a constitutional right. There's nothing in the Constitution about drugs.


Say yes to drugs.

Rick: Hey, Dawn. It's me. Ricky. I brought Dad, too. We're gonna take you home. DAWN: Dawn: Why he here? I fucking... Fucking hate him, Ricky. You know how much I hate him.
Rick: We're gonna take you home.
Dawn: Nah, I don't want to go home. This my home.
Rick: No, Dawn. You need to come with us, okay? You need to come with us now.
Dawn: I got all my stuff here. I can't leave my stuff.
Rick: It's all shit, Dawn. We'll get you new stuff.
Dawn: You'll get me new stuff?
Rick: Whatever you want.
Dawn: Promise?
Rick: I promise.

...

Rick: What are you doing out here?
Richard: Keeping watch. Making sure your sister gets home.
Rick: Dad, I'm pretty sure Dawn can cross the street by herself.
Richard: Yeah, you'd be surprised how easy it is to take a wrong turn, no matter how short the journey.
Rick: Is you all right?
Richard: Yeah, I'm better than all right. Seeing you and Dawn tonight, Ma and Pa, hell, I'm damn near perfect. It's just that, uh...
Rick: Just what?
Richard: Well, it's fragile. This thing. Family. And I don't want it to come apart, you know? I don't want to break it, again...Let's not break this, Ricky. Let's not get greedy. We don't need much more than we already have right now.
Rick: Yeah. All right, Pops.


The next day...

Dawn [after Richard and Rick are arrested]: What the fuck is going on?

...

Bill: Ricky's a leper.
Richard: Look, Bill, it's not like he killed anyone.
Bill: 650 grams, Rick. That's the law. You know how much was in that box? Eight kilos. That's 8,000 grams. It would be better for Ricky if he had killed someone.
Richard: Where are the Feds and the cops on this, right? They're the ones that got him dealing in the first place. Where the fuck are they?
Bill: Ask yourself this. Would you believe a 15-year-old kid was working for the federal government?
Richard: But he was.

...

Snyder: It's not a conspiracy, Richard. We just can't say anything publicly.
Richard: Yeah, but I can. I go to the press, tell them the Feds turned my son into a drug dealer, that's headlines from now till Sunday.
Byrd: That's not a smart move.
Snyder: Ricky's in a tough spot. I appreciate that. But we're not here to negotiate. We don't have a lot of power here. This is not a federal case. And the Bureau rejects any narrative that suggests we encouraged Ricky to sell drugs. He did that on his own, and he got caught. And now he's facing a life sentence. We want to offer Ricky an opportunity, maybe a way out.


Here we go again. Law enforcement wheeling and dealing, using and bruising folks like the Wershes in order to sustain the farce that is Reagan's "war on drugs".

Richard: What's he got to do?
Snyder: We'd like to get an agent on the inside. If you can do that, we can get some convictions. Maybe we can return the favor.

...

Richard [about the deal]: I think it's worth a shot, Rick. What do you think, champ?
Rick: I'll do whatever you say, Dad.

...

Richard: Okay. We're gonna need something in writing, all right? Some kind of contract.
Snyder: I'm sorry, we can't do that, Rick. I mean, if we have anything on paper, it's gonna look like Ricky's just saying whatever he needs to, to stay out of jail.
Richard [scoffingly]: So what the fuck are you saying?
Snyder [after a pause]: I'm saying you have to trust us.

...

Newsman [on TV]: Eleven police officers, including Jimmy Harris, were brought into the federal courthouse in handcuffs. Six civilians were also arrested, including the mayor's brother-in-law, Willie Volsan. Several law enforcement sources tell us that it was Rick Wershe Jr., aka White Boy Rick, who vouched for an undercover agent posing as a drug dealer who wanted to hire cops to protect his shipments. Sources also tell us Wershe provided information about homicide inspector Gil Hill and bribes paid to cover up an unrelated shooting.
Ray [clearly alarmed]: What is this?
Richard: Nah, it's okay, Pop. Me and Ricky, we got it all worked out. The Feds got it fixed up with the judge. We're all good. We're all good.
Newsman: Wershe, who has clearly made powerful enemies, now faces a life sentence if convicted of the cocaine charges.


Then the trial...

Judge: Will the defendant please rise?
[Rick stands]
Judge: The People of the State of Michigan find the defendant, Richard Wershe Jr., guilty of possession with the intent to distribute greater than 650 grams of a controlled substance, which, in the state of Michigan, carries a mandatory sentence of life --- without the possibility of parole.

...

Richard: Well, what the fuck happened, Alex?
Snyder: What do you want me to say? I mean, is anything I say gonna make you feel any better?
Richard: No, Ricky did his bit. It's time for you to do yours. What the fuck happened?
Snyder: Okay, let's be clear. You were promised nothing. You were told that the Bureau would make best efforts with the court to mitigate Ricky's sentence. We did that, the judge was not responsive.
Richard: "The judge was not responsive"? What the fuck is that? That's what you're calling your best fucking effort? That's your answer? No, you told me to trust you.
Snyder: I get that.
Richard: You told me to trust you. You didn't do shit.
Snyder: I have to go.
Ricvhard: You sold us out. You sold us fucking out!

...

Richard: Why's this happen to my son? Just tell me the truth. Why him?
Byrd: Well, you deal in narcotics, you get busted.
Richard: It's not true, Frank. God damn it, we had a deal.
Byrd: You know...I can't really square that circle for you, Rick. Your boy was out. And he decided to get back in. And you were not exactly an innocent bystander. You know, it's not about Ricky. It's not about his little friends. It's not about kids selling dime bags on the corner. We throw the little ones back, but when the big fish gets away, they got to take what's left in the net.
Richard: So 'cause you don't get the fucking mayor, my kid goes down.
Byrd [as Richard walks away]: He's young...He'll get out.

...

Richard [visiting Rick in prison]: Good to see you. I got some good news. Looks like they might overturn that 650 Lifer Law. I talked to Byrd, and he said that he and Snyder were willing to talk to the board if it comes to pass. And if that happens, you could be up for parole in, like, you know, six years.
Rick: That is good news.
Richard: They're not gonna get away with this, Ricky. You know, poked the lion one too many goddamn times.
Rick: All right, Dad.
Richard: It's like we always talked about, son. You got to lose a few battles to win the war.
Rick: We didn't talk about it. You did. And the war is over.
Richard: No, it's not, son. Don't say that. It's not over, you hear me?
Rick: Look where I'm at. It's like I'm dead in here. And that's how they want it.

...

Richard: Eight pounds, 14 ounces. That's what you weighed when you were born. Ricky, I remember the first time I looked in your eyes, I knew you were gonna be bigger than me. I knew your life was gonna be bigger than mine. Not just in size, but in life, in heart, in spirit. My life was hard, you know? Not yours. Yours was gonna be easy. Gonna be so goddamn easy. And I fucked up. And I'm sorry. I'm so...
[Richard breaks down sobbing]
Richard: You're my best friend, Rick. No, you're my only friend. You just remember you got me and you got Dawn, you got your daughter, all right? And we're not going anywhere. We're always gonna be right here. All right? Hey, it don't end like this. All right?
[The guard comes and Ricky has to leave]
Richard [on the prison phone after Rick stands up to leave...Rick hears none of it]: Hey, it don't end like this. All right? Don't you give up on me. Ricky, hey, it don't end like this. We're lions. Hear me? We're lions.

Title card: Rick has remained in the Michigan State Prison system since 1988, making his the longest-serving nonviolent offender in Michagan history. Richard Wershe Sr. passed away in 2014.

Johnny, Leo and Boo are no longer in prison. The corrupt Detroit police officers exposed by Rick's work with the FBI have all been released.

Rick has kept in touch with his daughter Keisha throughout his incarceration. She is happily married and has two sons.

...

Rick [the real Rick in a voiceover]: I don't think there's a person that works here that thinks I belong in prison. You don't know, having that life sentence off of you, the stress that it takes off of you and the foot that's been on my chest for all these years. This is my thirtieth birthday in prison, and, and it'll be the best one, so... Oh, man, I feel overwhelmed with joy, man. I mean, it's like, I swear to God, man, I feel, like, 10 years younger. It's weird, like, so much weight's been lifted off of me. "It's over. You're done. Michigan paroled you." I cried, man. I cried. And I want to go tell my grandma and grandpa that I made it out of prison, you know? I want to go visit them at their grave site. I got everything I need in life.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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iambiguous
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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Sat May 18, 2019 10:52 pm

Becoming a mule in the drug business is not unlike becoming lots of other things. That is, we either stumble into it or choose to become one because of circumstances that are not entirely in our control. Or we become mired in a situation in which there really are not any other viable options.

But don't expect that to be of any interest to those who have already locked in their disgust and contempt for those who play any part whatsoever in getting drugs to their kids. Or to their friends and loved ones. All the lives that are destroyed. The irony here being that this is never really part of the plot at all.

But that's just the way it goes out in the real world. People are more interested in reducing things like dope down to their own rendition of the lowest common denominator.

And just the sound of the word -- mule -- connotes all sorts of nasty reactions when the creature walks on two legs. And mules are at the rock bottom of the dope business: "Mules don't talk!"

Just not this one.

Still, here's a man who is 90 years old. He is "broke, alone and facing foreclosure on his business". So, is that desparate enough for you to nudge aside your own personal stereotypes?

And what if he's white? Does that matter? And what if he reaches the point where all that money starts rolling in and the money itself becomes the motive?

The Mule is what is commonly referred to in the film industry as a "character study". So, even though this is a "crime drama" don't expect a lot of "action" to unfold. It's more about figuring out where people choose to go and what they choose to do based on all the factors in their life that make this far more apparent to them than to others.

The film is "inspired" by the true story of Leo Sharp. But how far the facts depicted up on the screen are from a film "based" on his true story is anyone's guess.

Look for dykes on bikes.

Yeah.

IMDb

It is based on The New York Times article "The Sinaloa Cartel's 90-Year-Old Drug Mule" by Sam Dolnick, which recounts the true story of Leo Sharp, a World War II veteran in his 80s who became a drug courier for the Sinaloa Cartel.

For Clint Eastwood's Earl character, the costume designer wanted some of the wardrobe to have a worn look, so some of them were re-used from previous Eastwood movies like Gran Turino, True Crime and, in the case of the suit at the end, In the Line of Fire.

This was not the only time Clint Eastwood played a "mule." He also played one of a different kind in Two Mules for Sister Sara.


trivia at IMDb: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt7959026/tr ... tt_trv_trv
at wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Mule_(2018_film)
trailer: https://youtu.be/N_QksSzK7sI

The Mule [2018]
Directed by Clint Eastwood

Earl: Internet. Who needs it.

...

Earl [after the internet destroys his business]: Damn internet it ruins everything.
Man: So what are you going to do now?
Earl: I don't know. I've never been a plan-B type of guy. I'll find something.


But first it finds him.

Mary: You weren't there for your own daughter and now you're letting down your granddaughter? But it's no big surprise...you were never a real father or a husband.
Earl: I was on the road 60 hours a week to provide for this family.
Mary: On the road "providing"? Ha! You know what you did. You played with your friends. You sit around and hand each other trophies for watching seeds sprout. Mr. Daylily.

...

Rico: You know Earl, if you're really stuck, I know some people who will pay you to drive one city to another.
Earl: Pay me to just drive? What do you get out of it, slick?
Rico: All I'm saying is that I have friends looking for cautious drivers like you. You could help your granddaughter.

...

Man: Oye, viejito, do yourself a favor. Don't look in that bag. You night think you can identify us, or know about this tire shop, but don't forget, we know who you are.
Earl: I'm not gonna look in anybody's bag.
Man: Okay, papa.

...

Man [after Earl's first run]: You did good. Supposed to tell you to call this number anytime you need work, all right?
Earl: No. No no no. This is just a one time deal for me. Pass.

...

Mary: I see you're still into your flowers. I never understood how you could spend so much time and so much money on them.
Earl: I love 'em. I mean, they're unique. They just bloom one day and that's the end of it. They deserve all that time and effort.
Mary: So did your family.

...

Man: Earl, same hotel as before.
Earl [about to do his second run]: Yeah, same as before.

...

Laton [down in Mexico to his top man Julio]: That old man's gonna make a full run for us. Hundred and ten kilos. He has no record. He has no traffic tickets. I need you to travel with him, to monitor him, because he can become our top mule.

...

Luis: Why do you think I'd work for you guys?
Agent Bates: I mean, we found drugs, $425,000 in cash and three unlicensed firearms in your house...so, I mean, that's a start. Not to mention fraud, tax evasion, money laundering...I mean conservatively I'd say you're looking at back to back life sentences.
Luis: What do I do?

...

Earl: Great, mein Kommandant, very good.
Julio: Shut up. Shut up! Mules don't talk.

...

Bank official: The foreclosure will be canceled with your reinstatement payment. You said you had cash?
Earl [pulling out a wad of 100s]: Yeah. Right here.


Finally, on the third run, Earl can't resist looking in the bag.

Earl: Holy shit! Holy shit!

On the other hand, what did he think it would be, pecans?

Luis [now working for the DEA, to Bates]: This is where it starts, not just here, but dozens of hotels across the city. Mules come in from various locations, loaded, leave their vehicles, someone takes the vehicle, removes the load, and returns it with the mule's payment.

...

Julio [on the phone with Laton]: I'm gonna kill him, this fucking old man. He doesn't have any family. Who's gonna miss him? This son of a bitch should disappear. He doesn't follow simple instructions.
Laton: Okay, slow down. What did he do?
Julio: What did he do? He stops wherever he wants. He doesn't follow my instructions. He doesn't do what I tell him to do. Yesterday he stopped to see an old friend! I'm gonna kill him!!
Laton: Slow down. Slow down. He moves his own way. He's been successful. If he changes his route, it's probably better for us because then he's less predicable.
Julio: We don't oblige the other drivers like this.
Laton: You need to oblige me! Understood?
Julio: Understood.

...

Bates: What is this in code?
Luis: Symbols for each of the mules, along with symbols for their routes, dates and cargo loads. There's this new drug mule, Tata. New guy.

...

Julio: Everybody keeps looking at us here.
Earl: That's cause they see two beaners in a bowl of crackers.

...

Special Agent in Charge: What?
Bates: Cartel's top mule's on his way to a drop. So we know the route. We know it's a black pickup. It's a needle in a haystack but we at least it's a start.

...

Earl: Who do you have to kill to get a place like this?
Laton: Oh, many, many people.

...

SWAT captain: We got what they wanted, I suppose. Busts.
Bates: Yeah. Two nobody illegals and a few bags of coke to lay out for the press. Guess now I can retire.

...

Gustavo [who had Laton assassinated]: Laton is gone. He was getting too lenient. The DEA is cracking down and I'm not going to rot in prison becasue of his deficiencies. So I got rid of him. It's my show now. No more tardiness. No more going off radar. Everything goes according to plan. No deviations, no excuses. Everybody gets with the program, or they go away. I don't care who it is. And, yes, this goes for your gringo, too. Do you have a problem with that?
Julio: No.
New boss: Let's introduce him to the new crew. Show him we are not bullshitting.

...

Enforcer: I want you to listen carefully, viejo. There's new rules. You show up on time. You leave on time. No unscheduled stops. No fucking bullshit, man. All orders to be followed to the letter. We have a gift for you...


It's in the trunk.

Enforcer: We own your ass, cabron, so don't be stupid. Or you disappear.

...

Julio: Answer the phone. You do as your told. Don't be a problem.
[he motions towards the trunk]
Julio: That's what happens when you're a problem. You end up in the goddamn trunk.
Earl: Julio, mijo.
Julio: No, no, don't "Julio" me. We're not friends. I'm not your mijo.

...

Earl [to Mary, who is on her death bed]: Hello, Mary.
Mary: Earl? What do you want. You're not in the will or anything. Oh. Oh, I'n so sorry. I didn't mean it like that. I'm just scared is all.
Earl: Yeah. Well, the only person that wants to live to be 100 is a 99 year old, anyway.

...

Mary: You lived only to get back out there. All the flower conventions and the socializing and being the center of attention. They got the fun, wonderful man that you are. And we got the Earl who just couldn't wait to get back out there.
Earl: Yeah, you're right. I thought it was more important to be somebody out there than the damn failure I was at my own home.

...

Trevino [to Bates]: Hang on, there's a call coming from inside. They don't know where he is either. They sound pissed. They say when they find him, they're gonna kikll him.

...

Mary: Earl, tell me something.
Earl: Yeah, anything.
Mary: How did you come into all that money?
Earl: Well, I'm not gonna lie to you. I'm a high-end gigolo.
[Mary laughs]
Earl: Bounty hunter?
Mary: Come on. Seriously, come on.
Earl: All right, seriously. Okay. I've become a drug mule for the cartel. And I've got 305 kilos of cocaine sitting right in the back of my truck out there.
Mary [laughing again]: You're never going to tell me. Well, whatever you did, you didn't have to be rich to want you around.
Earl [after a long grim pause]: Yeah...

...

Bates: You.
Earl: Yeah.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby Meno_ » Fri May 24, 2019 6:01 pm

The English Patient




https://youtu.be/v3nzvn87rWY



The patient English



Patience has to be earned
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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Sat May 25, 2019 9:15 pm

"If you let me go, I won't tell anyone anything".

This is basically a remake of a film that has already been remade dozens of times.

You're out on the road. You're young, attractive and female. Your life is just the way you want it. And it's about to get even better if the job interview works out. You're described as an "ambitious, overachieving college senior who has a seemingly bright future." Then you make that proverbial wrong turn. Suddenly you are out in the middle of nowhere. Woods are now in every direction and it's a reality that you have almost no acquaintance with. Soon you find yourself battling both the "elements" and the "locals". You're smack dab in the middle of a forest smack dab in the middle of rural Kentucky. And that makes it all the more ominous. It's a whole other world down there...out there. Think Deliverance.

Then [of course] enter "the strange loner who has unknown intentions". After all, what can you really know about the stuff that goes on inside the head of another? But you're stuck. And he either will or will not take advantage of that. As with the life that we all lead there are so many different directions it can go. But then these two characters beget one of the most intriguing [and appealing] relationships I've ever seen in film. And I've seen lots and lots and lots of films.

It's basically a reflection on the age-old tale of a life that [for whatever reason] is turned upside down by a set of circumstances that, among other things, force you to think on your feet. Or perish. It's dog eat dog and only the strong [or the most resourceful] survive.

Look for some things you'll need to know about cooking meth.

IMDb

In accordance with Lunacy Productions' mandate to support female filmmakers, most of the key roles on the movie are filled by women, including director of photography, production designer, colorist, and sound mixer. The production was awarded a Women in Film LA finishing fund grant.

at wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rust_Creek
trailer: https://youtu.be/5sLIwhkWS3c

Rust Creek [2019]
Directed by Jen McGowan

GPS voice: In 500 feet make a right turn. Make a right turn.
Sawyer [arriving at the turn]: It's not even a road. Guess we're taking the next right.
GPS voice: Make a U-turn, if possible.
Sawyer: Give me better directions, if possible.
GPS voice: Make a U-turn, if possible.

...

Sawyer [aloud to herself]: This doesn't make any sense. Just reroute me.

...

Hollister: Say, you won't make it anywhere before sundown and we live just up a ways. So how about you come on over for some dinner?
Buck: Holli, shouldn't we just...
Hollister: Oh, he ain't going anywhere. What do you say?
Sawyer: Thanks, but I really should be getting going, so...
Hollister: No.. That... that... that might not be the best idea. I mean, you got lost driving around here and that was in broad daylight. And you don't wanna be out here after dark, trust me.
Sawyer: Listen, no offense, but you are starting to make me feel very uncomfortable right now.
Hollister: Is that a fact? Well, listen, we just want you to, uh... uh, be comfortable. That's all we want.

...

Sheriff: I got a call about an abandoned vehicle at the bend, down by Rust Creek.
Hollister: Well, as you can see, we prefer to abandon our vehicles right here at home.

...

Hollister: Now all we gotta do is find that bitch.
Buck: She was cut pretty deep, Holli. She ain't gonna last out here too long. Can't we just go back...
Hollister: Not until they find a body we're gonna have O'Doyle and the staties up our asses, Buck.
Buck: But if they find her, won't they be all over the place anyway?
Hollister: No, not all over. Just around where they find the body. Get it?

...

Lowell [finding a barely conscious Sawyer collapsed in the forest: Who are you? What are you doing out here?

...

Lowell: You lost blood. You need to eat.
Sawyer: I need a hospital and the police.
[Lowell says nothing]
Sawyer: What's your name? I'm Sawyer. Sawyer Scott.
Lowell: Shut up and eat.
Sawyer: I go to Centre College. I'm a senior. I was on my way to DC for a this big job interview and my stupid GPS got me lost. These two guys jumped me. I'm sure my friends are worried about me. And my parents..
Lowell [hearing something]: Quiet.
Sawyer: ...and if you could just untie me and take me to the police, you'd be a hero.
Lowell: Shh.

...

Sawyer [hearing a vehiucle approach the trailer]: Somebody help me! Somebody help me!
Lowell [gripping her mouth]: If they find you here they'll kill you. Keep quiet, or I can't help you.


Yep: Hollister and Buck

Sheriff: Look, before you send out your storm troopers start trampling out people's flower beds and kicking down their doors, let's just make sure she's not passed out in Virginia Beach somewhere.
Slattery [from the State Police]: Jesus Christ, O'Doyle you think I enjoy doing your job for you? I'm not about to send my men traipsing through the woods on Thanksgiving if I don't have to. But you better get a line on this girl soon or you gonna have state police choppers blocking out the sun down here.


And the sheriff doesn't want that.

Lowell: Pretty clever how you burned through them ropes.
Sawyer: What is that stuff?
Lowell: Lye.
Sawyer: Is that some kind of acid?
Lowell: Base.
Sawyer: Burns like acid.
Lowell: Bases burn too.
Sawyer: And the milk, that neutralized it?
Lowell: Milk ain't acid enough to neutralize lye. You'd need something like...like vinegar to neutralize lye.
Sawyer: So why don't you have some vinegar handy?
Lowell: You know what happens when you mix an acid with a base?
Sawyer: Neutralizes it?
Lowell: Yeah, with so much heat it burn you worse than the lye did. Thought you were a college girl.
Sawyer: I'm not a chemistry major.
Lowell: Well, that's why milk's better. Less reaction. Still burned quite a bit, thank you.
Sawyer: Why do you know so much about this stuff?
Lowell: I've been cooking meth since I was 14 years old. You learn real quick what all can burn you.

...

Sawyer: You know...if you let me go I won't tell them anything. You say you're trying to help me, but you're holding me here.
Lowell: Can't do it.
Sawyer: I promise I won't tell anyone anything. If you just let me go.
Lowell: We're five miles from the nearest road. Twenty from any kind of town. I got no car. You wouldn't make it a 100 yards the shape you're in. And even if you did, the first person you met would like as not hand you right over to Hollister.
Sawyer: Bullshit. You just wanna keep me here.
Lowell [cutting through the ropes]: You wanna try your luck out in them woods, go on. Hollister and Buck are going into Charleston this weekend. They'll leave their truck at their mama's house. I'll go down on Saturday and I'll borrow it. And then I'll take you some place safe. Out of Fording County.

...

Sheriff: I got some plain questions for you and I want some plain answers.
Hollister: Is this about that car?
Sheriff: Hell with the car. Now, I got the state police asking about a missing girl!
Hollister: We did what you told us, sheriff.
Sheriff: Son, if you'd done what I told you they would've found that girl's body somewhere down in Jonesboro County by now. I still don't know what the hell you dimwits were thinking.
Hollister: I told you, okay, she come up on us when we was burying that bag of shit. And we thought she seen somethin'!
Sheriff: Well, she seen something now.
Hollister: At this point, don't it figure she already out there in them woods froze to death?
Sheriff: At this point, it don't matter if she's out there dead in a gully or singin' on Bandstand. Without a body, these woods is gonna be crawling with state police.


The whole world is corrupt.

Sawyer: What are you doing?
Lowell: Cuttin' matchbooks.
Sawyer: What for?
Lowell: Cookimg meth.
Sawyer: I thought meth was made from, like...ephedrine and Drano.
Lowell: And matchbooks.
Sawyer: Why are you making meth? Isn't everyone doing heroin now?

...

Sawyer: So...you don't really know what you're doing. You're like one of those European pop bands that sing in English but don't actually know what any of the lyrics mean.
Lowell: You sure ride high for a girl who jammed her wet hands in a bucketful of lye yesterday.
Sawyer: I wasn't being condescending. I'm just saying. You know, it's amazing they got you doing all this complex chemistry and you don't even have to understand it.
Lowell: That ain't condescending?

...

Lowell: Hey, would you hand me that pitcher right there?
Sawyer: Why is it so cold?
Lowell: Just pour it in here. Real slow. It's cold 'cause the acetone inside, it's evaporating...sucking away the energy from what all it's touchin'. Mix that with the matchbooks, separate the red phosphorous. Then I'm gonna mix that with iodine to get hydroiodic acid, which I need to cook meth.
Sawyer: So you do all that for just one ingredient?
Lowell: That's the job.
Sawyer: Like a bunch of little science projects? Combine this ingredient, separate that one.
Lowell: Yeah, and just about every one of them will kill you. Every one of 'em is either corrosive flammable, both. Methanol, acetone, glycol, butane. You thought that lye was tough. We used to cook with this. Anhydrous ammonia. In here it's just a liquid that'll burn your skin right off. Room temp, it turns into poison gas. One spark....

...

Lowell [to Sawyer]: You fixing to make a break for it? Your call. But if you're just restless, I can put you to work.

...

Sawyer: Hey, what day is it?
Lowell: Thursday.
Sawyer: Thanksgiving.
Lowell: I guess you'd be with your folks, huh?
Sawyer: Actually, I was ditchin' them this year for a stupid job interview. And the worst part is I didn't even tell them why. I was too embarrassed in case I didn't get the job. All that scrambling around.. ...all my plans. What does is matter now?
Lowell: My wife used to say "Man plans, God laughs."
Sawyer: Yeah. Sounds like something my mom would say. Always talking about God's plan. Sure don't seem like much of one.
Lowell: Sure don't.

...

Sawyer: Now what?
Lowell: That's it. In 20 minutes, you'll be an official meth cook.
Sawyer: That ain't so hard. I don't know. Well, I think I might be starting to get used to the quiet country life.


Not many will see that coming.

Sheriff: Well, let me tell you somethin'. I got a lot invested in this here. And, uh, if I wanna go inside and take a look what y'all up to, I'm gonna do that.
Lowell: You ain't.
Sheriff: You forget who you're talking to? I'm the chief, you're the Indian.
Lowell: My kitchen...my rules.
Sheriff: You know, you ain't the only cook around here. So, why don't you just set that gun down and make nice? Don't kid yourself, boy. I could put two in you before you could even get them barrels up above your waist.
Lowell: Lucky for me then you're standing next to a drum full of ether. Too dangerous to keep inside. One spark from, say, some buckshot hitting the metal...
Sheriff: Hm. Wow. A Pritchert with some brains. Lord help us all.

...

Sawyer [after the sheriff leaves]: Was that your boss?
[Lowell nods]
Sawyer: He sounds like an asshole.
Lowell: He's the worst kind of snake there is. Don't rattle before he bite.

...

Lowell: I've been thinking about what your mama said. And about how cuttin' up matchbooks is part of making meth.
Sawyer: You doing a lot of thinking.
Lowell: I guess so. I got this idea they are kinda connected, you know? I don't got it figured out in my head yet, but it's like, like in our life, everyone we meet is a chemical reaction. They change us and we change them. 'Cause we change, we can go and have different reactions with other people. And we don't always know how it will end up. We don't. Like the matchbooks, they don't know how they are gonna end up. But just 'cause we can't see a plan, that don't mean there ain't one. Anyway, it made me feel a little better about things, thinking it all fit together somehow.

...

Sawyer: So that's it? All clear?
Lowell: Well, we should probably lay low for a little bit. I'll go pick up the truck around noon and drop you off with the state police.
Sawyer: What'll I tell them?
Lowell: Tell 'em the truth. I'll be cleared out of here by dark.
Sawyer: You're leavin'?
Lowell: It's time. You can only sit still so long. Besides, there's too many ghosts in these woods.

...

Hollister [having seen the two sets of muddy footorints]: You old dog. This explains everything! Well, you could've just told me. He didn't want to share. And he shouldn't have to. So what if we seen her first? That don't mean nothin' to me when it comes to Cousin Lowell's happiness. You proven to be pretty untrustworthy lately and I don't think we can leave it up to you to do the right thing here. So this little lady.. ...is just gonna have to come with us now.
Lowell: Take a seat, Holli.
Hollister: We ain't got time to be havin' this conversation, Lowell.
Lowell: Make time.

...

Lowell [to Hollister]: Here's the thing...I know what has to get done. And I'll take care of it...in my time. But for now...would you just let me have some fun? I mean, you see how trained I got her, don't you?

...

Hollister: You can't. We're partners.
Sheriff: Go ahead. Pick up the gun.
Hollister: I won't. I won't, I won't do it. You can't shoot me if I ain't armed.
Sheriff: You think I'm concerned with the forensics on a known felon shot outside a burning meth house? Son, I just wanted you to feel like you had a fighting chance.
[he shoots him dead]
Sheriff: You didn't.

...

Sheriff [with Sawyer in his squad car]: So you're saying this Lowell Pritchert guy was holding you?
Sawyer: No, not holding me. Hiding me.
Sheriff: Oh, okay, from, uh, from these other fellas that was after you.
Sawyer: Why aren't you calling this in? He could still be alive.
Sheriff: Hold on now there, miss. No sense in callin' anything in until I get all the facts. So these other fellas was it just the two of them?
Sawyer: Buck and Hollister. They all work for somebody else but I never saw him.


Needless to say she is seeing him now.

Sawyer: Shouldn't you at least call an ambulance or back-up or somethin'?
Sheriff: Well, now, here's the deal you're just gonna have to trust my way of doin' things 'cause around here, well, I'm the chief...you're the Indian.

...

Sheriff: Come on now. Just go on down a little further there...down by the water. They call this Rust Creek because of all the clay deposits up the hill. Turned the water red. And they mined up all the clay before I was born. That name stuck though. Let's go on now.
Sawyer: You don't have to do this.
Sheriff: Hm. In the water.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Sun Jun 09, 2019 1:53 am

"On the basis of sex".

It means a lot of different things to a lot of different people. And, over the centuries, it has changed considerably. But one thing we can all agree on is that on the basis of sex only women are able to become pregnant. And not every pregnancy is wanted. And soon the consequences of that may well be adjudicated in the highest court in the land. That land being America and that case revolving around abortion.

And Ruth Bader Ginsburg may or may not be on the court when the tide either does turn dramatically on abortion or does not. After all, she is now 86 years old, and recently underwent a "left-lung lobectomy". In fact, to this day many liberals bemoan her decision to stay on the court rather than retire and allow Obama and a Democratic Senate to replace her with a younger model.

Only time will tell how ironic that is.

Meanwhile there is still her story to tell. And of late that part seems to be everywhere. RBG lived a particular life, accumulated particular experiences, embodied particular political prejudices. Not unlike all the rest of us. Only very, very few of us make it to the United States Supreme Court.

And then this part: "Inspired by a true story". Right from the start we know that some of what we see is going to be "embellished". Amped up to make the plot more enticing.

On the other hand, we all have our own version of the truth, don't we?

Missing [of course]: The part where "the law of the land" [all the way up to the Supreme Court] is embedded in the historical evolution of political economy. You'll either grasp this or you won't.

Still, they do broach the historical relationship between culture and the law. Do you change the laws first in order to change the culture? Or, instead, do you first change the culture in order to change the laws? Like, for example, taking your value judgments to the streets and, in protesting, forming a "political movement".

Look for The Paper Chase.

And, of course, conflicting goods.

IMDb

The first case covered in Ginsburg's contracts class at Harvard Law School was Hawkins v. McGee (1943). This was also the first case covered in the contracts class in The Paper Chase (1973), also set at Harvard Law School.

Daniel Stiepleman - the writer of the film - is Ruth Bader Ginsburg's nephew.


at wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/On_the_Basis_of_Sex
trailer: https://youtu.be/28dHbIR_NB4

On the Basis Of Sex [2019]
Directed by Mimi Leder

Griswold: My name is Erwin Griswold. I am the dean of this place. Welcome to Harvard Law School. Take a moment to look around you. In this room, there are Rhodes and Fulbright Scholars, Phi Beta Kappa members, student body presidents, and a Harvard football team captain. Together you will become lawyers. This is a privilege you share. It is also a responsibility you accept. Consider... what does it mean to be a Harvard man? A Harvard man is intelligent, of course, but he is also tenacious. He is a leader devoted to the rule of law. He is mindful of his country, loyal to tradition, and he is respectful and protective of our institutions.

He says this to a sea of men. And [according to the camera] to three women. Though it turns out to be nine.

Ruth [holding up two dresses]: Which one makes me look more like a Harvard man?
Marty [her husband]: I'm thrilled to report that you look nothing like a Harvard man.
Ruth: Seriously. It's the dean's dinner, Marty. You know how I am at these things. I-I need to make a good impression.
Marty: And you will, Kiki, but you've got it wrong. It's not the dress. It's you.

...

Griswold: Esteemed colleagues, ladies. This is only the sixth year women have had the privilege to earn a Harvard law degree. This little soiree is our way of saying welcome....Let us go around the table, and each of you ladies report who you are, where you're from, and why you're occupying a place at Harvard that could have gone to a man.

...

Ruth: Uh, I'm... Ruth Ginsburg from Brooklyn.
Griswold: And why are you here, Miss Ginsburg?
Ruth [mockingly]: Uh, M-Mrs. Ginsburg, actually. My husband Marty is in the second-year class. I'm at Harvard to learn more about his work, so I can be a more patient and understanding wife.

...

Ruth: We came to Harvard to be lawyers. Why else?
Marty: It's truly an asinine question.
Ruth: He's never gonna take me seriously.
Marty: No, that's not true. You're the smartest person here, and you're gonna be the most prepared. So just stand up and say what you know. At a place like this, that's all that matters.
Ruth: In my experience, even small mistakes are glaring when you stick out.
Marty: Well, then you're very lucky. Because you... are very... short.

...

Professor Freund: Judges are bound by precedence, but they cannot ignore cultural change. A court ought not be affected by the weather of the day, but will be by the climate of the era.

...

Mr. Greene: Jesus, Mary and Joseph. Graduating top of your class. Law Review at Harvard... and Columbia. I didn't even know that was possible.
Ruth: Thank you, Mr. Greene. I've worked hard.
Greene: Well, you want some white-shoe firm. Big money cases, complex legal maneuvers...
Ruth: No, I think Bibler and Greene is the perfect fit. You handled the Mercer bankruptcy last year.
Greene: Come on. How many have you been to? They all turned you down, right? How many? Maybe ten?
Ruth: Twelve.
Greene: A woman, a mother, and a Jew to boot. I'm surprised that many let you through the door.
Ruth: One sent me to interview for the secretarial pool. Another told me I'd be too busy at bake sales to be effective. One partner closes his clients in the locker room at his club, so he said I'd be out of the loop. Last week, I was told women are too emotional to be lawyers. Then that same afternoon, that a... a woman graduating top of her class must be a real ballbuster and wouldn't make a good colleague. I was asked when I'd have my next baby. And whether I keep Shabbat. One interviewer told me I had a sterling resume, but they hired a woman last year, and what in the world would they want with two of us?


Greene then provides her with another excuse for not hiring women: jealous wives.

Marty: Did you get the job? You got the job. That's wonderful. Oh! So they're gonna give you a corner office, or are you still gonna have to jump through some hoops?
Ruth: It's not at Bibler and Greene. I wasn't what they were looking for.
Marty: That's okay. I told you one of those other firms would come back. Which one was it?
Ruth: Clyde Ferguson left his professorship at Rutgers. They haven't found another black man to replace him, so someone thought a woman would be the next best thing.
Marty: You can't quit. There are more firms out there. This is the biggest city in the most litigious country in the history of the planet. You can still...
Ruth: Marty, I got a job. Just open the champagne. Let's celebrate.

...

Marty: You know what I think? I think this is good. I think it's better. You won't be beholden to any firm, you won't have a partner breathing down your neck, and also, a professor is free to represent any client she chooses.
Ruth: As long as they don't mind a lawyer who's never actually practiced law.

...

Ruth [to her class]: I am Professor Ginsburg. This is Sex Discrimination and the Law. Some of my colleagues will tell you that sex discrimination doesn't exist, that I may as well be teaching the legal rights of gnomes and fairies.

...

Ruth [to the class]: Ten years ago, Dorothy Kenyon asked a question: If the law differentiates on the basis of sex, then how will women and men ever become equals? And the Supreme Court answered: They won't. Hoyt lost her appeal. The decision was unanimous. Discrimination on the basis of sex is legal.

...

Ruth: I want to know where you were.
Jane [her daughter]: Denise and I went to a rally to hear Gloria Steinem speak...She just started her own magazine. She testified in the Senate about...
Ruth: Yeah, I know who Gloria Steinem is. What if you got hurt or arrested?
Jane: Mom, it's a rally, not a riot.
Ruth: Jane, these things can get out of hand.
Jane: Okay, well, I'm 15 years old, and you don't need to control every minute of my life.
Ruth: Yes, I do. That is my job. And your job is to go to school and learn.
Jane: Well, Gloria says we need to unlearn the status quo.
Ruth: Oh, so you're on a first-name basis now?
Jane: You know what, Mom? If you want to sit around with your students and talk about how shitty it is to be a girl, okay, but don't pretend it's a movement. It's not a movement if everyone's just sitting. That's a support group.

...

Marty: Just tell me what you want.
Ruth: Nothing. I want nothing. I-I want you to go to work and wow your bosses and clients and be the youngest partner in the history of the firm.
Marty: That's not fair. That's not fair, and you know it.
Ruth: Then I want you to walk me home, Marty, so I can sit in my corner and write a lesson plan to inspire the next generation of students to go forth and fight for equality.
Marty: I don't understand why you're acting like that's such a bad thing. You're out there training the next generation of lawyers to change the world.
Ruth: 'Cause that's what I wanted to do!!!

...

Ruth: Marty... Section 214 of the tax code assumes a caregiver has to be a woman. This is sex-based discrimination against a man.
Marty: Poor guy.
Ruth: If a federal court ruled that this law is unconstitutional, then it could become the precedent others refer to and build on. Men and women both. It-it... It could topple the whole damn system of discrimination...Oh, Marty. We need to take this case.

...

Ruth: Mel, you must see the...the opportunity this case represents.
Mel: You think the judges are gonna be sympathetic just 'cause they all have prostates? Men and women all eat at the same lunch counters, they drink at the same water fountains, they go to the same schools...
Ruth: Women can't attend Dartmouth.
Mel: Men can't go to Smith.
Ruth: Women police officers can't patrol New York City streets. We have to get...We have to get credit cards in our husbands' names.
Mel: You're not a minority. You're 51% of the population! And it's been tried. Muller, Goesaert, Gwendolyn Hoyt.
Ruth: Yeah, and morally, they were right.
Mel: Yet they lost. Ruth... morality does not win the day. Look around you. Dorothy Kenyon could not get women equality by arguing a case with sex, murder and prison time on the line. You and Marty think you're gonna do it with this guy and his taxes?

...

Charles: So, if it's not for the money...why are you here?
Ruth: The 14th Amendment to the United States Constitution says all people must be treated equally under the law. Yet there are...I don't know how many laws like the caregiver deduction that say, in effect, women stay home, men go to work, and that it should stay that way forever. I want to convince the federal courts that those laws are unconstitutional.
Charles: How do you do that?
Ruth: One case at a time. Starting with yours.
Charles: So I'm a guinea pig?
Ruth: No, sir. You're the man marching out ahead of the band, leading the way. Just like that drum major you used to be.

...

Marty: So, how was your day?
[Ruth hands him an index card]
Marty: "History discloses that woman has always been dependent upon man. Like children, she needs special care. This justifies a difference in legislation..."
Ruth: Muller v. Oregon, the law of the land. Or Bradwell v. Illinois. "The destiny of woman is the benign offices of wife and mother. This is the law of the Creator." I'm writing this brief and citing the same cases with the exact same precedents as everyone before us. Marty, if this is what we go in with, we're gonna lose.

...

Dorothy: You ladies look lost. Well, spit it out.
Ruth: Miss Kenyon, w-we're here to see you. I tried to make an appointment...
Dorothy: Well, here I am. I don't have all day.
Ruth: It's about Gwendolyn Hoyt.
Dorothy: In that case, I have no interest in talking to either one of you.
Ruth: I'm-I'm arguing a case. Sex discrimination violates the Equal Protection principle.
Doprothy: Equal Protection was coined to grant equality to the Negro, a task at which it has dismally failed. What makes you think women would fare any better?
Ruth: Please, if we could just talk for...
Dorothy: You want to know how I blew it... is that it? What I'd do differently? Why? You think you can change the country?
[she turns toward Jane]
Dorothy: You should look to her generation. They're taking to the streets, demanding change, like we did when we fought for the vote. Our mistake was thinking we'd won. We started asking, "please," as if civil rights were sweets to be handed out by judges.
Ruth: Protests are important, but changing the culture means nothing if the law doesn't change. As a lawyer, you must believe that.
Dorothy: Let me guess. You're a professor, aren't you? A ton of knowledge and no smarts.

...

Dorothy: Tell your client she won't find equality in a courtroom.
Ruth: My client's name is Charles Moritz.
Dorothy: That's cute.
Ruth: He hired a nurse to take care of his mother, but...he was denied a caregiver deduction on his taxes.
Dorothy: He's never been married. You found a bachelor taking care of his mother at home. The judges will be repulsed by him.
Ruth: Feeling anything is a start.
Dorothy: What did you say your name was?
Ruth: Ruth Bader Ginsburg.
Dorothy: Well...sorry, Professor Ginsburg. Maybe someday. But the country isn't ready. Change minds first, then change the law.

...

Millicent: May I make an observation, Professor Ginsgurg? It's just...when I was typing it up, jumping out all over the brief was... well... sex. Sex, sex, sex, sex, sex, sex, sex. It reeks of hormones and back seats, and... you know how men are. Maybe you should try a less distracting word. Maybe... "gender."

...

Dorothy: In 1776, Abigail Adams wrote her husband a letter. "As you write this new constitution," she said, "remember the ladies." You know what that bastard went ahead and did?
Mel: Well, I can guess.

...

Mel: All right. The ACLU is prepared to put their name on your brief...I still say I'd rather be a woman in this country than a black man or a... socialist or a religious minority.
Ruth: Now, let's talk about you taking on Reed v. Reed.
Mel: Oh...Stop.
Ruth: All men in Idaho are better at math?
Mel: Ruth, I gave you one case. That's all you get.
Ruth: The Moritz argument works just as well for a female client. And Reed's a state supreme court case, which means the U.S. Supreme Court must hear the appeal.
Mel: I-I told you, I don't want another 50-year battle.

...

Griswold: Ten years I fought to enroll women at Harvard Law. The faculty, the university, my wife warned me against it. Now I'm solicitor general, it comes back to haunt me.
Ernest: Erwin, we could settle. Martin Ginsburg was one of my best students, a practical young man... we can call him, tell him we'll give the man his money and go our separate ways.
Griswold: No. No. We settle now, it's open season. Let's put this idea of gender discrimination to bed once and for all. They handed us a winnable case.
Ernest: Then we'll win it.
Griswold: You think he's up to it?
Ernest: Oh, Mr. Bozarth is a fine litigator. Tell him your idea.
Jim: We list the laws.
Griswold: What laws?
Jim: All of them. Every federal law that treats men and women differently. We show the court exactly what kind of can of worms these folks are trying to open.

...

Griswold: We don't want so-called gender discrimination finding its way to the Supreme Court.
Jim: Yes, sir, I understand that.
Woman: What-what makes this judge so difficult?
Jim: Well, ma'am, he's a civil rights crusader. Two years ago, he ordered Denver to start busing black students to white schools. There were protests, arson, demands for him to quit the bench. But even after someone threw a bomb at his house, Doyle wouldn't budge.
Griswold: In that case, he was enforcing the law. The Ginsburgs are asking him to make law. We need to drive home the difference. Paint the judges a picture of the America that will exist if they rule the wrong way. Children running home from school to find no one's there.
Ernest: Mommy's at the office or on a factory floor.
Griswold: Man and woman vie for the same job, she can work for less. What is a man without a paycheck to take care of his family?
Ernest: What woman would want him?
Jim: Wages would go down. Divorce rates would soar. The very fabric of our society would begin to unravel.
Griswold: Exactly. The other side wants this to be about the Equal Protection principle. The judges are deciding what kind of country, what kind of society they want their children and grandchildren to grow up in. You make sure the court sees what's at stake is the American family.

...

Marty: There is no aspect of the law at which Ruth Ginsburg can be bested. I don't know how things work at the ACLU, but if anyone at my firm couldn't see that, they would be fired.
Mel: Objection noted, counselor. She's still arguing half.
Marty: This is her...
Marty: Listen, she's written a revolutionary argument, but brief writing is an academic's job. Okay? Oral arguments require a lawyer who can command a judge's respect. A real appellate lawyer.

...

Mel: Allen is gonna be arguing in the Supreme Court that times have changed. We can't afford the Tenth Circuit saying that they haven't.
Ruth: Nothing would strengthen the argument more than the appeals court deciding for Charlie.
Mel: Yes, that would be very nice, but here in the real world, with working lawyers...
Ruth: You think I can't be persuasive?
Mel: Oh, I've never been more certain about anything in my life, Ruth. You don't get to tell me when to quit. You couldn't even make it through moot court without embarrassing yourself. You will lose, Ruth. And when you do, you will set the women's movement back ten years. More. We are dodging a bullet here. Are you the only one that can't see that?

...

Jane: Why is Mel Wulf being such a dick?
Ruth: He thinks I'm gonna lose.
Jane: No way, Jose. Not in my experience.
Ruth: As Mr. Moritz's lawyer, I'm... I'm ethically bound to convey him the offer.
Jane: So would you like help taking apart your life's work, or... is that something you'd rather do by yourself?

...

Charlie [on the phone]: And they'll say it, right? That I'm not a cheater, that the law is unfair?
Ruth: No, Charlie, the government won't say that on its own.
Charlie: But if they don't say it, how will I have won?
Ruth: You...you haven't. But you...you get the money.
Charlie: What about everyone else? When you came to see me, you said...
Ruth: Charlie, the settlement is only for you. No one else can benefit.
Charlie: But could we win?
Ruth: Well...we could, and...and the impact would last generations. But the ACLU feels... it's best if you take the offer.
Charlie: But you're my lawyer, Ruth. What do you think?

...

Ruth: My client was very excited about your offer.
Griswold: Good. Good.
Ruth: He did, however, have some conditions.
Griswold: Conditions? What kind of conditions?
Ruth: First of all, he'd like you to forgive a hundred percent of the money. None of this one dollar business. And he'd like the government to concede that he did nothing wrong. And enter into the court record that Section 214 of the tax code discriminates on the basis of sex and is therefore unconstitutional.
Griswold: I can't agree to that. And you know it.
Ernest: Does Mel Wulf know about this?
[Ruth says nothing]
Ernest: Then we'll see you in court.

...

Marty: You're ready for this. You've been ready for this your whole life. So go in there and let the judges see the Ruth Ginsburg I know.

...

Judge Holloway: Uh, Mrs. Ginsburg, you are aware that the government has three coequal branches? Mrs. Ginsburg?
Ruth: Yes, of course, Your Honor.
Judge Holloway: And that it is the Congress's role to write law?
Ruth [somewhat testily]: Your Honor, I understand how government works.
Judge Holloway: Well, uh, sometimes a law, even a good law, even a law that is legal under the Constitution, may not be good for every individual it affects.
Judge Doyle: I have a question. If I understand correctly, you're concerned about men and women being pigeonholed into certain roles based on gender.
Ruth: Yes, that's correct.
Judge Doyle: Uh, that wasn't my question. It strikes me that the caregiver deduction does the opposite. It helps women be able to work outside the home. Isn't that a good thing?
Ruth: But the law assumes it must be the woman who is supposed to be at home in the first place.
Judge Holloway: Well, that is the case in every family I know. So it's the assumption that's the problem.
Judge Daugherty: Then when can a law differentiate on the basis of sex? Never?
Ruth: When the classification rationally relates to the law.
Judge Holloway: Keeping women out of combat, for example.
Ruth: I'm not sure whether I agree with that example...
Judge Daugherty: Oh, so you think women belong on the front lines now, too?
Ruth:
No, that's not what... Gender, like race, is a biological, unalterable trait. There is nothing that women are inherently better at than men, nor vice versa.
Judge Holloway: Growing a beard? Lactation?
Ruth: No thinking person could possibly imagine that Charles Moritz's gender relates to his abilitt...
Judge Doyle: Why can't we, Mrs. Ginsburg? In most households, aren't women the primary caregivers? Aren't men the breadwinners? Aren't they?
Ruth: Most households, yes, Your Honor.
Judge Doyle: Doesn't that reality suggest that that's the natural order of things?

...

Jim: Congress created this tax deduction to help caregivers go out and work. Caregivers. Folks that, if they weren't working, would stay home. Now, are we meant to believe that this man would have the skill or even the caregiver's instinct to do that?
Judge Doyle: Why can't we believe that? Why does an unwed woman have that instinct but not an unwed man? Or a widower, for that matter?
Jim: Well, respectfully, Judge Doyle, a widower doesn't choose to be a caregiver. It's thrust upon them. And as for women, it doesn't take a legal treatise to prove what a hundred thousand years of human history has made indelibly clear.
Judge Doyle: And Congress can write the tax code to enforce this natural law?
Jim: Congress can write whatever tax code it wants. All I'm saying, Judge, is that given the natural order of things, this man, Mr. Moritz, hasn't suffered as a result. But the country will suffer if the court doesn't find for the appellee.

...

Jim: Your Honors, I am certain there isn't a man among us who wouldn't try to ease his wife's burdens. So I don't see how we can judge negatively the members of Congress who would do the same. And I'm not alone in that. There is a long and honorable tradition in the courts of upholding laws like this one. I, for one, would rather see my government err on the side of caring too much...of trying too hard to help the ladies of this country, rather than to be indifferent to their unique burdens. Now, maybe Mr. Moritz disagrees. Or maybe he just doesn't like paying taxes. Personally, I don't believe that. I believe that Charles Moritz is a victim. Not of his government, but of the lawyers who have used his case to achieve their own ends. Radical social change.

...

Judge Holloway: Counsel for the appellant, you have four minutes for rebuttal.


Marty starts to rise, but Ruth grabs his arm...she'll make the rebuttal argument.

Ruth: "Radical social change." When I was in law school, there was no women's bathroom. It's amazing to me now that we never complained. Not because we were timid; we were just astounded to be in law school at all. A hundred years ago, Myra Bradwell wanted to be a lawyer. She had fulfilled the requirements for the Illinois bar, but she wasn't allowed to practice because she was a woman. An injustice she asked the Supreme Court to correct. Illinois was so confident of victory, they didn't even send a lawyer to argue their side. They were right. She lost. That was the first time someone went to court to challenge his or her prescribed gender role. A hundred years ago. "Radical... social... change." 65 years ago, when women in Oregon wanted to work overtime and make more money, as men could, the court looked to the precedent in Bradwell and said no. So then there were two precedents. Then three, then four, and on and on, and you can draw a direct line from Myra Bradwell to Gwendolyn Hoyt, told ten years ago she was not entitled to a jury of her peers. That is the legacy the government asks you to uphold today. You are being urged to protect the culture and traditions and morality of an America that no longer exists. A generation ago, my students would have been arrested for indecency for wearing the clothes that they do. 65 years ago, it would have been unimaginable that my daughter would aspire to a career. And a hundred years ago...I would not have the right to stand before you. There are 178 laws that differentiate on the basis of sex. Count them. The government did the favor of compiling them for you. And while you're at it...I urge you to read them. They're obstacles to our children's aspirations.
Judge Doyle: You're asking us to overturn nearly a century of precedent.
Ruth: I'm asking you to set a new precedent, as courts have done before when the law is outdated.
Judge Doyle: But in those cases, the courts had a clear constitutional handle. The word "woman" does not appear even once in the U.S. Constitution.
Ruth: Nor does the word "freedom," Your Honor.

...

Judge Holloway [after her time is up]: Go on... Professor Ginsburg.
Ruth: The principal purpose of Section 214 is not to protect women nor to discriminate against men. It is to provide caregivers the opportunity to work outside the home. Therefore, as the Supreme Court did in Levy v. Louisiana, this court should fix the law most in line with the legislative intent. Extend the deduction to never-married men. Help all caregivers equally. Charles Moritz was well-raised to be the sort of man we should all hope our sons will become. Charlie deserves our admiration. Not only has he taken on the burden of caring for his very strong-willed mother when no one would expect it of him, but in doing so, he has surpassed the limitations the rest of us and our laws seek to force upon him. We're not asking you to change the country. That's already happened without any court's permission. We're asking you to protect the right of the country to change. Our sons and daughters are barred by law from opportunities based on assumptions about their abilities. How will they ever disprove these assumptions if laws like Section 214 are allowed to stand? We all must take these laws on, one by one, for as long as it takes, for their sakes. You have the power to set the precedent that will get us started. You can right this wrong. We rest our case on our briefs and argument, and ask... that you reverse the tax court's decision.

...

Mel: Kiki! That was perfect. That was perfect.
Ruth: We don't even know who won.
Mel: Doesn't matter. It was right.
Ruth: This is just the beginning.
Mel: Mm! I'm gonna go gloat.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Then here: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=185296
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