philosophy in film

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Tue Jul 17, 2012 6:45 pm

This is an enthralling and disturbing documentary. But it entirely leaves out one of the major ingredients of this particular fog: the military industrial complex that is rooted in what is basically America's war economy.

It's a classic example of why Phil Ochs wrote, "Love me, love me, I'm a liberal."

THE FOG OF WAR
A film by Errol Morris

McNamara: Okay. Any military commander who is honest with himself, or with those he's speaking to, will admit that he has made mistakes in the application of military power. He's killed people unnecessarily — his own troops or other troops — through mistakes, through errors of judgment. A hundred, or thousands, or tens of thousands, maybe even a hundred thousand. But, he hasn't destroyed nations.


The Cuban missle crisis:

McNamara: In the first message, Khrushchev said this: "We and you ought not to pull on the ends of a rope which you have tied the knots of war. Because the more the two of us pull, the tighter the knot will be tied. And then it will be necessary to cut that knot, and what that would mean is not for me to explain to you. I have participated in two wars and know that war ends when it has rolled through cities and villages, everywhere sowing death and destruction. For such is the logic of war. If people do not display wisdom, they will clash like blind moles and then mutual annihilation will commence."

...

I want to say, and this is very important: at the end we lucked out. It was luck that prevented nuclear war. We came that close to nuclear war at the end. Rational individuals: Kennedy was rational; Khrushchev was rational; Castro was rational. Rational individuals came that close to total destruction of their societies. And that danger exists today.

...

The major lesson of the Cuban missile crisis is this: the indefinite combination of human fallibility and nuclear weapons will destroy nations. Is it right and proper that today there are 7500 strategic offensive nuclear warheads, of which 2500 are on 15 minute alert, to be launched by the decision of one human being?


World War II

McNamara: I was on the island of Guam in [General Curtis Lamay's] command in March of 1945. In that single night, we burned to death 100,000 Japanese civilians in Tokyo: men, women, and children.

EM: Were you aware this was going to happen?

McNamara: Well, I was part of a mechanism that in a sense recommended it. I analyzed bombing operations, and how to make them more efficient. i.e. Not more efficient in the sense of killing more, but more efficient in weakening the adversary.

...

I wrote one report analyzing the efficiency of the B—29 operations. The B—29 could get above the fighter aircraft and above the air defense, so the loss rate would be much less. The problem was the accuracy was also much less.

50 square miles of Tokyo were burned. Tokyo was a wooden city, and when we dropped these firebombs, it just burned it.

EM: The choice of incendiary bombs, where did that come from?

McNamara: I think the issue is not so much incendiary bombs. I think the issue is: in order to win a war should you kill 100,000 people in one night, by firebombing or any other way? LeMay's answer would be clearly "Yes."

"McNamara, do you mean to say that instead of killing 100,000, burning to death 100,000 Japanese civilians in that one night, we should have burned to death a lesser number or none? And then had our soldiers cross the beaches in Tokyo and been slaughtered in the tens of thousands? Is that what you're proposing? Is that moral? Is that wise?"

...

Why was it necessary to drop the nuclear bomb if LeMay was burning up Japan? And he went on from Tokyo to firebomb other cities. 58% of Yokohama. Yokohama is roughly the size of Cleveland. 58% of Cleveland destroyed. Tokyo is roughly the size of New York. 51% percent of New York destroyed. 99% of the equivalent of Chattanooga, which was Toyama. 40% of the equivalent of Los Angeles, which was Nagoya. This was all done before the dropping of the nuclear bomb, which by the way was dropped by LeMay's command.

Proportionality should be a guideline in war. Killing 50% to 90% of the people of 67 Japanese cities and then bombing them with two nuclear bombs is not proportional, in the minds of some people, to the objectives we were trying to achieve.

LeMay said, "If we'd lost the war, we'd all have been prosecuted as war criminals." And I think he's right. He, and I'd say I, were behaving as war criminals. LeMay recognized that what he was doing would be thought immoral if his side had lost. But what makes it immoral if you lose and not immoral if you win?


Vietnam:

McNamara: Kennedy announced we were going to pull out all of our military advisors by the end of '65 and we were going to take 1000 out by the end of '63 and we did. But, there was a coup in South Vietnam. Diem was overthrown and he and his brother were killed.

I was present with the President when together we received information of that coup. I've never seen him more upset. He totally blanched. President Kenndy and I had tremendous problems with Diem, but my God, he was the authority, he was the head of state. And he was overthrown by a military coup. And Kennedy knew and I knew, that to some degree, the U.S. government was responsible for that.

...

Johnson: Hello, Bob?
McNamara: Yes, Mr. President.
Johnson: I hate to modify your speech any because it's been a good one, but I just wonder if we should find two minutes in there for Vietnam?
McNamara: Yeah, the problem is what to say about it.
Johnson: I'll tell you what I would say about it. I would say that we have a commitment to Vietnamese freedom. We could pull out of there, the dominoes would fall, and that part of the world would go to the Communists. We could send our marines in there, and we could get tied down in a Third World War or another Korean action. Nobody really understands what it is out there. They're asking questions and saying why don't we do more. Well, I think this: you can have more war or you can have more appeasement.

...

McNamara: Ultimately, President Johnson authorized bombing in response to what he thought had been the second attack ? it hadn't occurred but that's irrelevant to the point I'm making here. He authorized the attack on the assumption it had occurred, and his belief that it was a conscious decision on the part of the North Vietnamese political and military leaders to escalate the conflict and an indication they would not stop short of winning.

We were wrong, but we had in our minds a mindset that led to that action. And it carried such heavy costs. We see incorrectly or we see only half of the story at times.

EM: We see what we want to believe.

McNamara: You're absolutely right. Belief and seeing, they're both often wrong.

...

McNamara: We [then] introduced what was called "Rolling Thunder," which over the years became a very, very heavy bombing program. Two to three times as many bombs as were dropped on Western Europe during all of World War II.

...

McNamara: Let me go back one moment. In the Cuban Missile Crisis, at the end, I think we did put ourselves in the skin of the Soviets. In the case of Vietnam, we didn't know them well enough to empathize. And there was total misunderstanding as a result. They believed that we had simply replaced the French as a colonial power, and we were seeking to subject South and North Vietnam to our colonial interests, which was absolutely absurd. And we, we saw Vietnam as an element of the Cold War. Not what they saw it as: a civil war.

...

McNamara: The former Foreign Minister of Vietnam, a wonderful man named Thach said, "You're totally wrong. We were fighting for our independence. You were fighting to enslave us."

We almost came to blows. That was noon on the first day.

"Do you mean to say it was not a tragedy for you, when you lost 3 million 4 hundred thousand Vietnamese killed, which on our population base is the equivalent of 27 million Americans? What did you accomplish? You didn't get any more than we were willing to give you at the beginning of the war. You could have had the whole damn thing: independence, unification."

"Mr. McNamara, You must never have read a history book. If you'd had, you'd know we weren't pawns of the Chinese or the Russians. McNamara, didn't you know that? Don't you understand that we have been fighting the Chinese for 1000 years? We were fighting for our independence. And we would fight to the last man. And we were determined to do so. And no amount of bombing, no amount of U.S. pressure would ever have stopped us."

...

McNamara: There's a wonderful phrase: "the fog of war."

What "the fog of war" means is: war is so complex it's beyond the ability of the human mind to comprehend all the variables. Our judgment, our understanding, are not adequate. And we kill people unnecessarily.

Wilson said: "We won the war to end all wars." I'm not so na?ve or simplistic to believe we can eliminate war. We're not going to change human nature anytime soon. It isn't that we aren't rational. We are rational. But reason has limits.

There's a quote from T.S. Eliot that I just love:

We shall not cease from exploring
And at the end of our exploration
We will return to where we started
And know the place for the first time.


Now that's in a sense where I'm beginning to be.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Wed Jul 18, 2012 12:12 am

SWEPT AWAY [1974]
Directed by Lina Wertmüller

Raffaella: I guess Gennarino wants to punish us because we represent capitalism.
Captain: If it weren't for you we'd be in a factory sweating for slave wages.
Raffaella: But while we wait for the revolution, just for once, Gennarino can cook the spaghetti right!

...

Raffaella: You're a miserable dirty rotten coward. Do what you like but you'll be sorry. There must be a law against it. You'll go to jail for refusing to help a person in need. You eat but let others starve to death.
Gennarino: If there was a law against it, all the rich would be in jail, imagine that! But since there is no law only the poor are locked up.
Raffaella: Communist prick!

...

Raffaella: I knew it! Proletarians go crazy as soon as they get a taste of power! They blackmail you, starve you, take advantage. Worse than Hitler, they are! If that Sicilian savage thinks I'll come begging on my hands and knees, he'd better think again. I'd rather die of hunger, I swear to God.


A short time later:

Raffaella: Sell me that fish! I'll pay you whatever you want!!
[Gennarino just sits there stuffing his face]
I knew you were a rotten louse but you won't let me die of hunger will you?
[pause]
Okay, let's be reasonable. You're the one with the upper hand for the moment. How much do you want for the fish? Two hundred, three hundred dolars?! So how much do you want?!
Gennarino: [throwing pieces of fish into the fire]: I've decided to do as you lot do.
Raffaella: What lot?
Gennarino: Yes lady! You burn apples and oranges to keep prices high! Isn't that so?
Raffaella [flustered] Murderer!

...

[b]Rafaella [watching Gennarino kill a rabbit] No! Later after Gennarino skins and cooks it: I feel like that rabbit. You killed it.
[Long pause] You're really cruel.


Then they [sort of] fall in love.

Of course, like many Communists back then, Gennarino is a sexist pig.

Roger Ebert

It's here that the movie begins to venture into philosophical and sexual mischief-making, because although Lina Wertmuller is a leftist, she is not, apparently, a feminist. She seems to be trying to tell us two things through the episodes on the island: (1) that once the corrupt facade of capitalism is stripped away, it's the worker, with the sweat of his back, who deserves to reap the benefit of his own labor, and (2) that woman is an essentially masochistic and submissive creature who likes nothing better than being swept off her feet by a strong and lustful male. This is a notion the feminists have spent the last 10 years trying to erase from our collective fantasies, and it must be unsettling, to say the least, to find the foremost woman director making a whole movie out of it. And Wertmuller doesn't kid around.

The guy is truly a fucking brute. I can only try to imagine the reaction of, say, Simone deBeauvoir!

But there is also a lot to say in this film about the relationship between morality and power.

Finally, it shows how a circumstantial landslide can reconfigure "I" into a point of view you would not have been able even to imagine once before.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Wed Jul 18, 2012 3:06 pm

Timothy Treadwell is one of those strange people it is truly impossible to pin down. He is all over the map. In the end, we take out of him what we first put into him: "I".

GRIZZLY MAN
A film by Werner Herzog

Herzog: All these majestic creatures were filmed by Timothy Treadwell who lived among wild grizzlies for summers. He went to remote areas of the Alaskan peninsula believing that he was needed there to protect these animals and educate the public. During his last five years out there, he took along a video camera and shot over hours of footage. What Treadwell intended was to show these bears in their natural habitat. Having myself filmed in the wilderness of jungles, I found that beyond the wildlife film, in his material lay dormant a story of astonishing beauty and depth. I discovered a film of human ecstasies and darkest inner turmoil. As if there was a desire in him to leave the confinements of his humanness and bond with the bears, Treadwell reached out, seeking a primordial encounter. But in doing so, he crossed an invisible borderline.

...

Pilot: Right up top of the hill here is where we found what was left of Tim's body... his head and a little bit of backbone. And we found a hand, arm, wristwatch still on the arm. I remember the watch. Shoot, I can remember the watch. And here's a guy that used to dive in the lake down here naked to scare the airplanes away. And here I'm finding his watch and arm on top of the hill. And here's about all that's left of the bear that killed him. A few pieces of rib bone. This bear was shot, and drug off and eaten by other bears here, right in this area. The tough thing out of all this is Tim would have never wanted to see any bears killed. Even if they had killed him, he would've... He would've been happy if nobody found him.

...

Helicopter pilot: I'm Sam Egli. I was called out as a helicopter pilot to assist on the cleanup after the Treadwell tragedy of last winter. I was in there the morning the Fish and Game officers were there examining the bear that had done the killing. The bear was all cut open. It was full of people. It was full of clothing. It was... We hauled away four garbage bags of people out of that bear. Treadwell was, I think, meaning well, trying to do things to help the resource of the bears. But to me he was acting like... like he was working with people wearing bear costumes out there instead of wild animals. Those bears are big and ferocious, and they come equipped to kill ya and eat ya. And that's just what Treadwell was asking for. He got what he was asking for. He got what he deserved, in my opinion. The tragedy of it was taking the girl with him. I think the only reason that Treadwell lasted as long in the game as he did was that the bears probably thought there was something wrong with him. Like he was mentally retarded or something. That bear, I think, that day decided that he had either had enough of Tim Treadwell, or that something clicked in that bear's head that he thought, "Hey, you know, he might be good to eat." My opinion, I think Treadwell thought these bears were big, scary looking, harmless creatures that he could go up and pet and sing to, - and they would bond - Look it there! As children of the universe or some odd. I think he had lost sight of what was really going on.

...

Herzog: Amie Huguenard remains a great unknown of this film. Her family declined to appear on camera, and Amie herself remains hidden in Treadwell's footage. In nearly hours of his video, she appears exactly two times. Here disembarking from the plane in the year of her death. We never see her face. Here it is obscured by her hands and her hair. Greetings, children of America. The second shot that we have doesn't show her face either. She remains a mystery, veiled by a mosquito net, obscured, unknown. Only through Treadwell's diaries do we know that she was frightened of bears. The only other hint we have of her presence is this shot here of Treadwell. It is handheld, and we can only deduct it must have been Amie operating the camera.

...

Herzog: During the fatal attack, there was no time to remove the lens cap. Jewel Palovak allowed me to listen to the audio. I hear rain, and I hear Amie, "Get away! Get away! Go away!" Can you turn it off? Jewel, you must never listen to this.
Jewel [a close friend of Treadwell's] I know, Werner. I'm never going to.
Herzog: And you must never look at the photos I've seen at the coroner's office.
Jewel: I will never look at them. - Yeah. They said it was bad. Now you know why no one's gonna hear it.
HerzogI think you, you should not keep it. You should destroy it. - Yeah. - I think that's what you should do.
Jewel: Okay.

...

Treadwell's father [discussing his son]: I know he got on Love Connection with Chuck Woolery. I think he got on another show. There were promises made that never came true. And he tested with the actors to get the bartender job on Cheers. And allegedly he came in second to Woody Harrelson. How close a second? I don't know. But that is what really destroyed him. That he did not get that job on Cheers. He spiraled down.

...

Treadwell: This is a bumblebee who expired as it was working at doing the pollen thing on this Alaskan fireweed. And it just is... Just has really touched me to no end. It was doing its duty, it was flying around. Working busy as a bee, and it died right there. It's beautiful, it's sad, it's tragic. I love that bee.

...

Treadwell: There's Wendy's poop. It just came out of her butt. I can feel it. I can feel the poop. It's warm. It just came from her butt. This was just inside of her. My girl. I'm touching it. It's her poop. It's Wendy's poop. I know it may seem weird that I touched her poop, but it was inside of her. It's what... It's her life! It's her! And she's so precious to me.

...

Treadwell: Everything about them is perfect. Perfection belonged to the bears.
Herzog: But once in a while, Treadwell came face-to-face with the harsh reality of wild nature. This did not fit into his sentimentalized view that everything out there was good, and the universe in balance and in harmony. Male bears sometimes kill cubs to stop the females from lactating, and thus have them ready again for fornication.
Treadwell [finding a fox killed by wolves]: Oh, God! I love you. I love you and I don't understand. It's a painful world.
Herzog: Here I differ with Treadwell. He seemed to ignore the fact that in nature there are predators. I believe the common denominator of the universe is not harmony, but chaos, hostility and murder.

...

Treadwell [reacting to a prolonged drought that has brought the bears to cannibalism---no salmon run] This does not make me very, very happy. I want rain. I want, if there's a God, to kick some ass down here. Let's have some water! Jesus, boy! Let's have some water! Christ man or Allah or Hindu floaty thing, let's have some fucking water for these animals!

...

Herzog: Now Treadwell crosses a line with the Park Service which we will not cross. He attacks the individuals with whom he worked for years.
Treadwell: I beat your fucking asses! I protected the animals! I did it! Fuck you! Animals rule. Timothy conquered. Fuck you, Park Service! Okay.
Herzog: It is clear to me that the Park Service is not Treadwell's real enemy. There's a larger, more implacable adversary out there: The people's world and civilization.
Treadwell: "Oh, Timothy, I'm getting a bad feeling about you."
Herzog: He only has mockery and contempt for it. His rage is almost incandescent, artistic. The actor in his film has taken over from the filmmaker. I have seen this madness before on a film set. But Treadwell is not an actor in opposition to a director or a producer. He's fighting civilization itself. It is the same civilization that cast Thoreau out of Walden and John Muir into the wild.
Treadwell: Animals rule. All right. That's my happy stuff. Let's do a couple of nice takes now. Oh, man, did I get angry! Fuck them, right? They do not watch these animals. They don't care about these animals. All they wanna do is screw people like me around. It's amazing. "Let the fishermen fucking shoot the animals. Let the fucking poachers come in here and fuck 'em. Let the fucking commercial people fuck them around with their fucking cameras and the tourists. But we're gonna go screw with Timothy Treadwell because he loves animals and teaches kids for free. Let's go. Let's do that. That's what we're gonna do." Well, fuck them. Fuck them. I beat you, motherfuckers. I beat you. Beat ya, so fuck you. I beat ya. I beat ya. I'm the champion. I'm the fucking champion. I beat you. I beat your fucking asses. Fucking losers! Fucking nobodies! Fuck! Fucking fucks!

...

Herzog: This is Timothy Treadwell's and Amie Huguenard's route to the site of their death. There was a certain absurdity in their end. As usual, the expedition was over by the end of September, and both had returned to Kodiak on their way back to California. Treadwell writes in his diary that at the airport he had an altercation with an obese airline agent over the validity of his ticket. "How much I hate the people's world, " he writes. And disgusted, he decides right then to return to this spot and his bears. Once back in the Grizzly Maze, Amie had mixed feelings. She was afraid of the bears and had a deadline to return for a new job and spoke openly about leaving him for good. According to one of the last entries in Treadwell's diary, Amie called him hell-bent on destruction. And yet, inexplicably, she remained with him here in the Maze. Normally Treadwell would not be here this late in the year. And upon their return, he discovered that many of his bear friends had gone into hibernation. And scary, unknown and wilder bears from the interior had moved in.

...

Treadwell [a few days before he dies]: Let me tell you. Honestly, camping in grizzly country is dangerous. People who camp in grizzly country should camp out in the open to let the bears know where the tent is. My camp is unseen. It is the most dangerous camping, the most dangerous living in the history of the world by any human being. I have lived longer with wild brown grizzly bears, without weapons, and that's the key, without weapons, in modern history than any human on earth, any human. And I have remained safe. But every second of every day that I move through this jungle, or even at the tent, I am right on the precipice of great bodily harm or even death. And I am so thankful for every minute of every day that I found the bears and this place, the Grizzly Maze. But let me tell you, ladies and gentlemen. There is no, no, no other place in the world that is more dangerous, more exciting than the Grizzly Maze. Come here and camp here. Come here and try to do what I do. You will die. You will die here. You will frickin' die here.

...

Herzog: Very late in the process of editing this film, we were given access to Treadwell's last videotape. Here he may have filmed his murderer. The killer bear we know was a male whom years earlier the Park Service had anesthetized. They extracted a tooth which established him as being at the time of the attack. Quite old for a bear. They also tagged him via a tattoo on his inner lip. They had given him a number only, Bear 141 . That's all we know of him. And here. Could this one be Bear 141? What looks playful could be desperation. So late in the season, the bear is diving deep for one of the few remaining salmon carcasses at the bottom of the lake. Treadwell keeps filming the bear with a strange persistence. And all of a sudden, this. Is Amie trying to get out of the shot? Did Treadwell wait till his last tape to put her in his film? And what haunts me, is that in all the faces of all the bears that Treadwell ever filmed, I discover no kinship, no understanding, no mercy. I see only the overwhelming indifference of nature. To me, there is no such thing as a secret world of the bears. And this blank stare speaks only of a half-bored interest in food. But for Timothy Treadwell, this bear was a friend, a savior. Amie Huguenard was screaming.

Doctor: All of a sudden, the intensity of Amie's screaming reached a new height and became very, very loud. And she really now was screaming at the top of her lungs. These horrifying screams were punctuated by Timothy saying, "Go away. Leave me. Go away. Run! Get out of here." In other words, Timothy is trying now to save Amie's life because Timothy realizes, at this point in time during this attack, Timothy knows he's gonna die. He knows that. My sense of listening to this tape is that the bear let go, probably let go of the top of his head where I found massive lacerations. That is tears of the scalp away from his head. Suddenly, though, the bear, after letting go, grabbed Timothy somewhere in the high leg area. And Timothy, appropriately in my opinion, as a human being, decided now is the time to save one life anyway. If his life was going away, if his life was fading away, now was the time for Amie to get out.

...

Herzog: Treadwell is gone. The argument how wrong or how right he was disappears into a distance into a fog. What remains is his footage. And while we watch the animals in their joys of being, in their grace and ferociousness, a thought becomes more and more clear. That it is not so much a look at wild nature as it is an insight into ourselves, our nature. And that, for me, beyond his mission, gives meaning to his life and to his death.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Wed Jul 18, 2012 9:29 pm

JINDABYNE
Directed by Ray Lawrence.


Policeman: We don't step over bodies to enjoy our leisure activities. A pack of bloody looloos. I'm ashamed of you. The whole town is ashamed of you.

...


Newspaper headline: MEN FISH OVER DEAD BODY

...

Stewart: I didn't want to upset you. I thought it could wait until this morning.
Claire: What really happened out there?
Stewart: I told you. Nothing happened. We just got stuck is all. Jesus, I don't know what the fuss is all about.
Claire: What if it had been Tommy in the water?
Stewart: But it wasn't Tom! It was a stranger!
Claire: Last night...how could you have touched me like that after finding her?
Stewart: Claire, I am so exhausted...
Claire: She needed your help.
Stewart: She didn't need my help...there was nothing anybody could do.

...

Detective [to Claire]: You see this cut around her ankle? Stewart did that when he tethered her to a tree. Too lazy to walk back up to the road. I think maybe they just got off on the whole thing.

...

Victum's family on tv news broadcast: They're animals! I don't know how any civilized human being could do what they did. And I really wonder how differently they would have acted if she were white.
Stewart [watching it]: Here we go...

...


Claire: Just tell me...
Stewart: Tell you what?
Claire: How it felt....fishing with her tied up in the water. just tell me how did it make you feel.
Stewart [wearily]: Please leave this alone.
Claire [pleading]: I just want you to tell me.
Stewart [exploding out of his chair]: It felt good! Is that what do you want me to say? It was a beautiful day, the river was beautiful, I felt so fucking alive!! [turns and walks away] Jesus, if that's a crime I don't know it.
Claire: I hate the way you did that. I hate the way you end a conversation when you've had enough.
Stewart: Well, you know something, I have had enough.
Claire: I hate the way you guzzle your beer, you watch TV, you fuck like a robot!
Steve: I work like a fucking dog! That's my life! The beer and the fuck are supposed to be a bonus!!
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Thu Jul 19, 2012 3:22 pm

MIDNIGHT IN PARIS
Written and directed by Woody Allen


Helen: John hates French politics.
John: They've certainly been no help to the United States.
Gil: Well, I mean, you can't exactly blame them for not following us down that rabbit hole in Iraq, with the whole Bush...
Inez: Please, let's not get into that discussion yet again.
Gil: Honey, honey, we're not getting into...By the way, it's fine for your father and I to disagree. That's what a democracy is. Your father defends the right wing of the Republican Party, and I happen to think you've almost got to be, like, a demented lunatic to do that, but it's like...
Inez: Okay, okay!
Gil: No, but it doesn't mean we don't respect each other's views. Am I right?


The look on John's face? Priceless.

...

Gil: Yeah, actually, she's right. I recently read a two-volume biography on Rodin, and Rose was definitely the wife, Camille the mistress.
Paul: You read that? Where did you read that?
Gil: Yeah, I just read it. I was surprised because I mistakenly thought, like you, that it was the other way around. It's an easy mistake.
[after Paul is out of earshot]
Inez: When did you read the biography on Rodin?
Gil: Me?
Inez: Yeah.
Gil: Why would I read a biography on Rodin?

..

Adriana: I keep forget that you are a tourist.
Gil: That is putting it mildly.

...

Gil: That was Djuna Barnes? No wonder she wanted to lead!

...

Gil: 500 francs for a Matisse? You know, that seems fair. So, can I get 6 or 7?

...

Gil: It's understated but elegant. That's what you always say.
Helen: Cheap is cheap. That's what I always say.

...

Inez: You always take the side of the help. That's why Daddy says you're a communist.

...

John: Say hello to Trotsky!
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Thu Jul 19, 2012 11:11 pm

THE ICE STORM
Durected by Ang Lee

Wendy [Saying grace at Thanksgiving]: Dear Lord, thank you for this Thanksgiving holiday. And for all the material possessions we have and enjoy. And for letting us white people kill all the Indians and steal their tribal lands. And stuff ourselves like pigs, even though children in Asia are being napalmed.
Ben: Jesus! Enough, alright?...Paul, roll? Can I have the gravy?

...

Janey: Ben, you're boring me. I have a husband. I don't have a need for another one.

...

Philip: Sometimes the shepherd needs the comfort of the sheep.
Elena: I'm going to try hard not to understand the implications of that.

...

Jim [Stopping by his son's room, putting down his luggage]: Hey guys, I'm back!
Mikey: You were gone?

...

Mikey: Because of molecules we are connected to the outside world from our bodies. Like when you smell things, because when you smell a smell it's not really a smell, it's a part of the object that has come off of it, molecules. So when you smell something bad, it's like in a way you're eating it. This is why you should not really smell things, in the same way that you don't eat everything in the world around you because as a smell, it gets inside of you. So the next time you go into the bathroom after someone else has been there, remember what kinds of molecules you are in fact eating.

...

Ben: Well, that's the whole point of the holidays, Paul. So you and your sister can mope around the house, and your mother and I can wait on your hand and foot, while the two of you occasionally grunt for more food from behind the hair in your faces.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Fri Jul 20, 2012 8:58 pm

I'VE LOVED YOU SO LONG
Directed by Philippe Claudel

Juliette [to a mute grandfather who reads all day]: In prison, I'd put books by my pillow. Their presence reassured me. A sort of rampart against the world. A world without me.
[pause]
It got along fine without me.

...

Faure: Do you watch TV?
Juliette: No, it doesn't interest me.
Faure: I thought all inmates watched it.
Juliette: Don't believe all you hear.
Faure: I force myself. It's become a sort of punishment.
Juliette: Punishment?
Faure [more to himself]: Everything they show is so ugly. A pile of trash they serve up every night. Every night, the pile gets a bit bigger.

...

Gerard [after a dinner party discussion of Rohmer]: Well, Juliette, what do you think? Juliette says nothing. Juliette observes us, judges us. Just who is Juliette? Mysterious Juliette. Etheral Juliette.....Let's find out why Lea hid her ravishing sister from us so long. Where was Juliette? What was Juliette up to? Was she far away? Mad at Lea? In a convent?
Luc: You're a boor.
Gerard: In a Swiss convent? A bear handler in the circus? A Mossad secret agent? Amnesiac? Tell us, Juliette.
Lea: Shut up, Gerard!
Gerard: Let her speak. For once I have a real literary heroine. I want to hear her. I want the truth. Juliette disappears, reappears. Beautiful Juliette. Juliette! Juliette! Juliette!
Juliette: I was in prison for 15 years, for murder.
[The guests burst out laughing...they think she is joking]

...

Lea [teaching her class]: That's only true of Raskolnikov. You can't extend the notion of redemptive guilt to mankind, and say that every murder contains its own redemption.
Student: But the novelist always seeks to reconstruct the world. Dostoyevsky was no different.
Lea: The novel's narration is impersonal and incomplete, as he refused to give one world view. He knows it's mutiple, that intentions are multiple as are truths.
Student: It was written in first person.
Lea: So?
Student: Maybe his initial aim was to present a soul to give an intimate yet universal portrait of the murderer.
Lea [obviously thinking about Juliette, her sister]: Nonesense! Nonesense! What do you know anyway? What do you know about murderers? What did Dostoevsky know? What did Dostoevsky know about murder? Nothing! Nothing at all! Masterpieces are just hypotheses! Simplistic constructions. Nothing compared to real life! Stop treating books as bibles!!

...

Hospital director: Several colleagues have complained about your coldness, your standoffishness, your silence. It's awkward, very awkward.
Juliette: So, am I fired?
Hospital director: No, no. I never said that. But, you are on trial...make an effort. That's it, make an effort. Don't be so withdrawn. Open up a little. Of course, I understand that it mustn't be...well...I understand, but...
Juliette: What do you understand?

...

Lt. Segral: You report to me from now on. I'm replacing Captain Faure.
Juliette: So, he's gone to the Orinoco?
Segral: If that's what you call shooting yourself through the mouth...

...

Lea: We were there. Didn't we matter?
Juliette: Do you think others matter then? That one cares what they think and do? You were all alive and well! You belong to the kind of world one comes to hate for the mere fact that they are there.
Lea: Why didn't you tell us? Why? I was there! We could have helped you!
Juliette [in anguish]: Helped me in what way? What could you have done?
[pause]
When he screamed out in pain...when his limbs started writhing and when he was choking, when he was choking to death, what could you have done?! WHAT COULD YOU HAVE DONE?!
Later...
Juliette [who had been a doctor before going to prison]: From the beginning, I knew. From the first symptoms. I did the tests myself in the lab. And one night, Pierre [her son] took the paper to write a poem. He was so proud when he gave it back. Little fella...
[long pause]
He was so handsome, so happy. And I saw the little corpse he would become. I felt inside me a pain, like a big hand ripping out my stomach and heart, which kept rampaging inside me. So, I took him with me. They said I kidnapped him. It's true, I kidnapped him. I kidnapped my own son. One night we had a big party at the Greeen House. By then, he could barely move. We sang and we laughed. I read him all his favorite stories. Then I laid him down. I said I loved him and was going to inject him. I stayed right up against him till morning.
[pause]
Nothing mattered anymore. I wanted to go to prison. Either way, I was guilty. I'd given birth to him and condemned him to die. And I had nothing to say. Explain. Explain what? To whom? Explaining is looking for excuses. Death has no excuses. The worst prison is the death of one's child. You never get out of it.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Sat Jul 21, 2012 12:51 am

THE MAN IN THE MOON
Directed by Robert Mulligan

Dani: I'm afraid nothing's ever gonna make sense again.
Maureen: Maybe life's not supposed to make sense, Danielle
Dani: Doesn't that scare you?
Maureen: Yes, it does.

...

Dani: I wanna know you.
Court: You do know me.
Dani: I wanna know you more... I wanna know you all I can.
Court: What do you wanna know?
Dani: I wanna know... your hopes.
Court: Well...I hope your boobs will get bigger and your butt will fill out.

...

Dani: When two people really care about each other, they try to understand things. Even when it's hard.

...

Matthew: Where's Dani?
Maureen: Off roaming around somewhere.
Matthew: She's supposed to be here helping out. She's getting too big to be running around wild.
Abigail: Used to be she was too little. Now she's too big. I guess she passed just right while nobody was looking.

...

Matthew: You know, Dani, you and Maureen are going to be sisters for a long time.
Dani: Don't ask me to forgive her.
Matthew: You've got a right to grieve Dani, you've got a right to be hurt. But if you get so wrapped up in your own pain that you can't see anyone else's then you might as well just dig yourself a hole and pull the dirt in on top of you because you're never going to be much use to yourself...or anyone else.
Dani: You don't know what she did.
Matthew: I know enough. I know hating your sister is not going to bring Court back. Maureen's been good to you all your days, remember that. She's hurting bad right now...hurting as much as you. Maybe more.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Sat Jul 21, 2012 10:33 pm

A film that exposes how politics -- ensconced in political economy -- really works. In France this time. But everywhere of course. The criminal justice system is allowed to go after the small fish...but not the big ones. Here in America, for example, the Jack Abramoffs go to jail but not the ones who run the big banks, K-street and Congress. Those who run, as Felix notes below, "the big scams."

COMEDY OF POWER [L'ivresse du pouvoir]
Directed by Claude Chabrol

Preface:

"This film does not claim to depict real events. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is, as they say, coincidental."


Michel: I didn't buy the flat. You can't prove it. You're bluffing.
Justice Jeanne Charmant-Killman: I'm bluffing and you're lily white.

...

Michel: Some people have done much worse than I have.
Justice Jeanne Charmant-Killman: Those who back you?
Michel: I never said that.

...

Jeanne: I made this in a jiffy out of nothing.
Philippe: You could always make things in a jiffy out of nothing. You don't lack talent.
Jeanne: What do I lack?
Philippe: I'll tell you someday.

...

Justice Jeanne Charmant-Killman: You know this man?
Michel: Rene Lange.
Justice Jeanne Charmant-Killman: Are you on good terms?
Michel: He's a politician. Politics isn't business.
Justice Jeanne Charmant-Killman: Some people think so.

...

Felix: Michel Humeau's an underling.
Jeanne: That would surprise me.
Felix: It surprised him to be the tree that hides the forest.
Jeanne: What forest?
Felix: The one growing silently. I've had a feeling all along. I hate to say it, but I know them. The big scams are elsewhere.
Jeanne: I'll haul them all in.


Right.

Justice Jeanne Charmant-Killman: So, how did the money move around?
Jean-Baptiste: I have no idea. I talk with leaders, to find out what they want...You chew the fat to make a deal for the group. Different custums.
Justice Jeanne Charmant-Killman: How do the secret funds work?
Jean-Baptiste: That's what you call it. The funds are made available by heads of state. It's normal. It's the same everywhere.
Justice Jeanne Charmant-Killman: Great, in countries where you can die of appendicitis!
Jean-Baptiste: I deplore it as much as you do.

...

Justice Jeanne Charmant-Killman: Tell me, Mr. Boldi, does an envelope of $800,000 ring a bell?
Boldi: Madam, money is the oil you use to grease the gears so that the market runs properly. An envelope of $800,000...It doesn't mean a thing. It's peanuts!

...

Presiding judge [her boss]: You're moving fast.
Justice Jeanne Charmant-Killman: I need to. I'm counting on you to contact the Chancellor.
Presiding judge: Look, calm down and listen to me. You look really beat. You should take a vacation.
Justice Jeanne Charmant-Killman: Not until the Swiss banks answer.
Presiding judge: The situation's changed. The new group intends to start on a new footing.
Justice Jeanne Charmant-Killman: I don't believe a word of it. It will be the same schemes and new expenses.
Presiding judge: You lost your objectivity. I need a fresh eye.
Justice Jeanne Charmant-Killman: What do you mean exactly?
Presiding judge: I'll be honest with you. I don't want you to run into trouble. So listen to me. There are too many vipers involved. Let it rest for a while...If you don't take time off, I can have you transferred.
Justice Jeanne Charmant-Killman: Don't they call my post the most powerful in France?
Presiding judge: They say lots of things....Think it over my dear Jeanne. You know I'm very fond of you. I'll take care of your bonus.
Justice Jeanne Charmant-Killman: You can keep it, Your Honor. To buy yourself a pair of balls.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Sun Jul 22, 2012 4:26 pm

A tiny slice of the class struggle. But more intriguing still are the minds of Sophie and Jeanne. Perhaps we can explain them, perhaps we cannot. Are they wicked...or are they mad?

Especially Sophie.

LA CEREMONIE
Directed by Claude Chabrol

Sophie: I heard something about you.
Jeanne: Something good, I hope.
Sophie: You killed your daughter
Jeanne: It's not true. It was her own fault. Anyway, they couldn't prove it.


Later:

Jeanne [reading a newspaper article about a daughter who killed her father]: I know something about you too. Isn't that a picture of you?
Sophie: Yes.
Jeanne [grinning]: Did you kill him?
Sophie [brinning back]: They couldn't prove it.
[They both burst out laughing]
Jeannne: Enough of that. Let's go help the poor.

...

Sophie: You can't come over anymore.
Jeanne: You can't see who ever you want? What bullshit!
Sophie: I won't listen to them.
Jeanne: They're pathetic. What do they know? They've got it all. Their biggest worry is what color car to buy...I'd be happy with a tenth of what they have. I'd have the life I wanted. Instead of just the opposite.
[pause]
They won't get away with it.

...

Sophie [after they shoot the entire family]: Good.
Jeanne: Well done. I have to go. You know what to do?
Sophie: I'll clean up.
Jeanne: Afterwards, you'll need to call the police. Say you found it like this. They won't be able to prove anything.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Mon Jul 23, 2012 12:26 am

BARTON FINK
Written and directed by the Coen Bros.

Barton: Have you read the Bible, Pete?
Pete: Holy Bible?
Barton: Yeah.
Pete: Yeah, I think so. Anyway, I've heard about it.

...

Jack: The important thing is we all want it to have that Barton Fink feeling. We all have that feeling, but since you're Barton Fink, I'm assuming you have it in spades.

...

Mastrionotti: Fink. That's a Jewish name, isn't it?
Barton: Yeah.
Mastrionotti: Yeah, I didn't think this dump was restricted.

...

Geisler: Look, you confused? You need guidance? Talk to another writer.
Barton: Who?
Geisler: Jesus, throw a rock in here, you'll hit one. And do me a favor, Fink: throw it hard.

...

Geisler: Mayhew, some help, the guy's a souse!
Barton: He's a great writer...
Geisler: A great souse!
Barton: You don't understand...
Geisler: Souse!
Barton: He's in pain, because he can't write...
Geisler: Souse! Souse! Can't write? He manages to write his name on the back of his paycheck every week!

...

Garland [to Barton, while trying to get Barton to go to Hollywood]: The common man will still be here when you get back. Who knows, there may even be one or two of them in Hollywood.
Barton: That's a rationalization, Garland.
Garland: Barton, it's a joke.

...

Charlie: I pulled off early today. Took your advice, went to a doctor about this ear. He says 'You have an ear infection, ten dollars please'. So I says 'I told you I had an ear infection, you give me ten dollars!' Well that started an argument.

...

Barton: I gotta tell you, the life of the mind... There's no roadmap for that territory... And exploring it can be painful. I have pain most people don't know anything about.

...

Charlie: I could tell you some stories...
Barton: Sure you could and yet many writers do everything in their power to insulate themselves from the common man, from where they live, from where they trade, from where they fight and love and converse and...
Barton: So naturally their work suffers and regresses into empty formalism and... well I'm spouting off again, but to put it in your language, the theatre becomes as phony as a three-dollar bill!
Charlie: Well I guess that's a tragedy right there!

...

Barton: I've always found that writing comes from a great inner pain. Maybe it's a pain that comes from a realization that one must do something for one's fellow man to help somehow ease the suffering. Maybe it's personal pain. At any rate, I don't believe good work is possible without it.
Bill: Hmm. Well, me, I just enjoy making things up. Yessah escape. Its when I can't write I can't escape myself, I want to rip my head off and run screaming down the street with my balls in a fruit pickers pail.

...

Barton: Look, uh, maybe it's none of my business but don't you think a man of your talent..that your first obligation is to your gift? Shouldn't you be doing whatever you have to to work again?
Bill: What would that be, son?
Barton: I don't know exactly, but I do know what you are doing with that drink is cutting yourself off from your gift and from Audrey and your fellow man and everything your art is about.
Bill: Oh, no, son, I'm building a levee---gulp by gulp, brick by brick, putting up a levee to keep that raging river of manure from lapping at my door.

...

Bill: Breech my levee at your peril!!
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Mon Jul 23, 2012 3:47 am

Elephant in the post office, elephant in the school, elephant in the theater.

ELEPHANT
Written and directed by Gus Van Sant

Girl in Cafeteria: What are you writing?
Alex: Uh, this? It's my plan.
Girl in Cafeteria: For what?
Alex: Oh, you'll see.

...

Alex: [after Eric gets into the shower with him] Well this is it. We're gonna die today. I've never even kissed anyone before, have you?

...

Nathan: You're fuckin' sick. Don't do this.
Alex: Eeny, meeny, miney, moe.

...

[We follow Benny down the hallway and watch as he comes upon Eric berating and standing over Mr. Luce]
Eric: Yeah, you did, and I should shoot you right now for it, you know I should. But I think I just might let you live, maybe, because I want you to know this... and the next kids that come up to you with their problems... that they're being picked on, you should listen to them... no matter what twisted shit they say.
Eric: [Turns and shoots Benny through the heart] Fuck! Anyway, Mr. Luce, whatever. You know there are others like us out there, too. And they will kill you if you fuck with them like you did me and Jared. Get out of here, before I change my mind. Go!
Eric: [Mr. Luce gets up and runs for his life. Eric changes his mind and shoots him down] Bitch!

...

Alex: So foul and fair a day I have not seen.

...

Alex: At that time, there should be kids flushing out in all directions and well be able to pick them off one by one. Then, after that, you'll hit your yellow line here, which is your plan B. You'll go up through Mr. Luce's office and take care of all that. While I go, on the red line, up through this hallway where we'll have the best targets, dumb-ass jocks and shit. We'll have a fucking field day down there. I mean, come on. You've got your tec-9 and your rifle and I've got my shotgun and my .223 on my back. And I got a couple of pistols and a knife. We have enough explosives to last us almost a day. Most importantly, have fun, man.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Mon Jul 23, 2012 11:15 pm

Of course: You're dreaming that I'm dreaming that you're dreaming this entire thing.

Admittedly, dispite the rather fascinating philosophical exploration into what is and is not "real" in or out of our dreams, I thought the plot of this film was rather, well, preposterous. Right up there with, "Beam me up, Scotty".

INCEPTION:
Directed by Christopher Nolan.


Professor: Mr. Cobb has a job offer he would like to discuss with you.
Ariadne: Like a work placement?
Cobb: Not exactly.

...

Cobb: You create the world of the dream, you bring the subject into that dream, and they fill it with their subconscious.
Ariadne: How could I ever acquire enough detail to make them think that its reality?
Cobb: Well dreams, they feel real while we're in them, right? It's only when we wake up that we realize how things are actually strange. Let me ask you a question, you, you never really remember the beginning of a dream do you? You always wind up right in the middle of what's going on.
Ariadne: I guess, yeah.
Cobb: So how did we end up here?
Ariadne: Well we just came from the a...
Cobb: Think about it Ariadne, how did you get here?

...

Ariadne: What's happening?
Arthur: Your subconscious is looking for the dreamer; me. Quick, give me a kiss.
Ariadne: [She kisses him and then looks around]
Ariadne: They're still looking at us.
Arthur: Yeah, it was worth a shot.

...

Mal: You keep telling yourself what you know. But what do you believe? What do you feel?

...

Cobb: I can't stay with her anymore because she doesn't exist.
Mal: I'm the only thing you do believe in anymore.
Cobb: I wish. I wish more than anything. But I can't imagine you with all your complexity, all you perfection, all your imperfection. Look at you. You are just a shade of my real wife. You're the best I can do; but I'm sorry, you are just not good enough.

...

Saito: If you can steal an idea, why can't you plant one there instead?
Arthur: Okay, this is me, planting an idea in your mind. I say: don't think about elephants. What are you thinking about?
Saito: Elephants?
Arthur: Right, but it's not your idea. The dreamer can always remember the genesis of the idea. True inspiration is impossible to fake.
Cobb: No, it's not

...

Cobb: I need to get home. That's all I care about right now.
Ariadne: Why can't you go home?
Cobb: Because they think I killed her.
Ariadne: [silence]
Cobb: Thank you.
Ariadne: For what?
Cobb: For not asking whether I did.

...

Eames: They come here every day to sleep?
Elderly Bald Man: [towards Cobb] No. They come to be woken up. The dream has become their reality. Who are you to say otherwise, son?

...

Cobb: What is the most resilient parasite? Bacteria? A virus? An intestinal worm? An idea. Resilient... highly contagious. Once an idea has taken hold of the brain it's almost impossible to eradicate. An idea that is fully formed - fully understood - that sticks; right in there somewhere.

...

Ariadne: I guess I thought the dream-space would be all about the visual, but it's more about the feeling. My question is what happens when you start messing with the physics of it.

...

Cobb: They say we only use a fraction of our brain's true potential. Now that's when we're awake. When we're asleep, we can do almost anything.

...

Cobb: I'm going to improvise. Listen, there's something you should know about me... about inception. An idea is like a virus, resilient, highly contagious. The smallest seed of an idea can grow. It can grow to define or destroy you.
Mal: The smallest idea, such as: "Your world is not real". Simple little thought changes everything. So certain of your world. Of what's real. Do you think he is? Or do you think he's as lost as I was?

...

Cobb: In a dream...we create and perceive our world simultaneously. And our mind does this so well that we don't even know it's happening
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Tue Jul 24, 2012 2:20 am

Remind me never to go to Fargo. Or Brainard.

FARGO
Written and directed by the Coen Bros.

"Yer darn tootin'"

Jerry: Well, he's never done this before. But seeing as it's special circumstances and all, he says I can knock a hundred dollars off that Trucoat.
Irate Customer: [stunned that Jerry still intends to charge him for something he didn't order] One hundred... You lied to me, Mr. Lundegaard. You're a bald-faced liar. A... fucking liar.
[pause]
Irate Customer: [to his wife, frustrated] Where's my goddamn checkbook? Let's get this over with.

...

Airport Lot Attendant: There's a minimum charge of four dollars; long-term parking charges by the day.
Carl: I guess you think you're... you know, like an authority figure, with that stupid fuckin' uniform, huh buddy? King clip-on-tie there, big fuckin' man, huh? You know these are the limits of your life, man. The rule of your little fuckin' gate here. Here's your four dollars, you pathetic piece of shit.

...

Gaear: I need unguent.
Carl: What?
Gaear: Unguent.

...

Marge: I'm not sure I agree with you a hundred percent on your police work, there, Lou.

...

Marge: Say, Lou, didya hear the one about the guy who couldn't afford personalized plates, so he went and changed his name to J3L2404?
Lou: Yah, that's a good one.

...

Carl: Who the fuck are you?
[Wade doesn't answer]
Carl: WHO THE FUCK ARE YOU?!!
Wade: I got your damn money; now where's my daughter?
Carl: I am through fuckin' around here. Drop that fuckin' briefcase!
Wade: Where's my daughter?
Carl: Fuck you, man! Where's Jerry? I gave simple fuckin' instructions.
Wade: Where's my damn daughter? No Jean, no money!
Carl: Drop that fuckin' money!
Wade: No Jean, no money!
Carl: Is this a fuckin' joke here?
[shoots Wade]
Wade: [as he sinks to his knees and falls back] Aww, Jeez.
Carl: Happy now, asshole? What's with you people? Ya fuckin' imbeciles!

...

Carl: [on date with hooker] So, how long you been with the escort service?
Escort: I don't know, a few months.
Carl: Find that work interesting, do ya?
Escort: What're you talkin' about?

...

Hooker No. 1: Well, the little guy was kinda funny-lookin'.
Marge: In what way?
Hooker No. 1: I dunno... just funny-lookin'.
Marge: Can you be any more specific?
Hooker No. 1: I couldn't really say... He wasn't circumcised.
Marge: Was he funny lookin' apart from that?
Hooker No. 1: Yah...
Marge: So, you were havin' sex with the little fellow, then.
Hooker No. 1: Uh huh...
Marge: Is there anything else you can tell me about him?
Hooker No. 1: Like I said he was funny lookin'. More than most people even.
Marge: What about the other fella?
Hooker No. 2: He was older. You know, he looked like the Marlboro man....The reason I'm saying that is he smoked alot of Marlboros. You know like a subconscious kind of thing.

...

Norm: They announced it.
Marge: They announced it?
Norm: Yeah.
Marge: So?
Norm: Three-cent stamp.
Marge: Your mallard?
Norm: Yeah.
Marge: Oh, that's terrific.
Norm: It's just a three-cent stamp.
Marge: It's terrific.
Norm: Hautman's blue-winged teal got the 29-cent. People don't much use the three-cent.
Marge: Oh, for Pete's sake. Of course they do. Whenever they raise the postage, people need the little stamps.

...

Carl: Would it... kill you to say something? "No." That's the first thing you've said in the last four hours. That's a... that's fountain of conversation, man. That's a geyser. I mean, whoa daddy! Stand back, man. Shit. I'm sitting here driving. Doing all the driving, man. The whole fucking way from Brainard driving. Just trying to... chat, you know. Keep our spirits up, fight the boredom of the road, and you can't say one fucking thing just in the way of conversation. Oh fuck it. I don't have to talk to you either, man. See how you like it. Just total fucking silence. Two can play at that game, smart guy. We'll just see how you like it. Total silence.

...

Carl: [entering cabin, with shot-up face] You should see the other guy. [he sees Jean Lundegaard's dead body] What the fuck happened to her?
Gaear: [watching TV and eating TV dinner] Uh, she started shrieking, y'know. She wouldn't stop...
Carl: Geesus. Well, it doesn't matter. I got the money. All of it. All eighty grand [he puts a couple stacks of bills down on table] That's forty for you, forty for me.
[Gaear pokes at the stacks of bills with his fork]
Carl: That's it, then. You can have my truck,I'm takin' the Ciera.
Gaear: We split that.
Carl: [pause] How the fuck do you split a fuckin' car, ya dummy? With a fuckin' chainsaw?
Gaear: One of us pays the other for half.
Carl: Hold on! No fuckin' way! You fuckin' notice this? I got fuckin' shot! I got fuckin' shot in the face! I went and got the fuckin' money. I got shot fuckin' picking it up! I've been up for thirty-six fuckin' hours! I'm taking' that fuckin' car! That fucker's mine, you fuckin' asshole!
[as usual, no response from Gaear]
Carl: You know, I've been listening to your fuckin' bullshit all week! Are we square?
[no response from Grimsrud who continues staring at the TV]
Carl: [flashing his gun] ARE WE SQUARE?!!
[no response]
Carl: Yeah, ya fuckin' mute. And if you see your friend Shep Proudfoot, tell him I'm gonna nail his fuckin' ass!
[he exits angrily toward the Ciera; after a few moments, Grimsrud follows him out the door with an axe in hand]
Carl: [Showalter turns and sees Gaear striding toward him, axe raised] Oh no! Aaaaaah!
[Grimsrud brings the axe down toward Carl's neck]
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Tue Jul 24, 2012 5:20 pm

The mystery of madness. And not just in Hollywood. This film, after all, is based in part on the actual murders committed by John List.

THE STEPFATHER [1987]
Directed by Joseph Ruben

Jerry: Wait a minute, who am I here?
Sue: Jerry?
Jerry: That's right. Jerry Blake. Thanks, honey

...

Jerry [tensely]: This kind of thing really gets to me, you know. That a man can be driven to do something like that to his own family, to his children. I don't even want to know about it.
Neighbor: It makes you wonder though. What's it take to make a guy turn his family into gainsburgers?
Jerry: Maybe they disappointed him.

...

Stephanie: It's like living with Ward Cleaver.

...

Dr. Bondurant: Sounds like you had a strict upbringing.
Jerry: You might say that
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Tue Jul 24, 2012 10:30 pm

In a pop culture world, royalty and the ruling class duke it out over hearts and minds.

THE QUEEN
Directed by Stephen Frears


Alastair Campbell: You going to speak to the Queen?
Tony Blair: Yep.
Alastair Campbell: Ask her if SHE greased the brakes.
Tony Blair: Now, now.

...

Prince Philip: Sleeping in the streets and pulling out their hair for someone they never knew. And they think we're mad!

...

Tony Blair: Will someone please save these people from themselves!

...

Robin Janvrin: The Prime Minister is on his way, ma'am.
HM Queen Elizabeth II: To be, Robin, Prime Minister to be. I haven't asked him yet.

...

Cherie Blair: [impersonating the Queen] Thank you so much for coming, now fuck off!

...

Prince Philip: [discussing the guest list for Diana's funeral] A chorus line of soap stars and homosexuals....Elton John wishes to sing at the funeral. Should be a first for Westminster Abbey.

...

HM Queen Elizabeth II: Do you think it wise for the boys to go stalking so soon?
HM The Queen Mother: Anything that gets them into the fresh air is a good thing.
HM Queen Elizabeth II: Well maybe they shouldn't take their guns, I mean if a photographer were to see them it might send out the wrong signal.
HM The Queen Mother: If there is a photographer out there, he could be the first kill of the day

...

Prince Charles: Did we remember the Royal Standard?
Aide: Yes sir.
Prince Charles: And flowers?
Aide: Yes, sir.
Prince Charles: Good, because if we leave it to the royal undertakers, they'll bring her back in a wooden ctate.

...

HM Queen Elizabeth II: Nowadays people want glamor and tears, the grand performance. I've never been good at that.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Wed Jul 25, 2012 6:47 pm

Incredibly [or not so incredibly] this film is based on actual events.

CITY OF GOD
Directed by Fernando Meirelles


Rocket [Buscape as a boy]: A picture that could change my life, but in the City of God, if you run away they get you, and if you stay they get you too. It's been that way ever since I was a kid.

...

Knockout Ned: Have you lost your mind? You are just a kid!
Steak and Fries: A kid? I smoke, I snort. I've killed and robbed. I'm a Man!!

...

Buscape: That was my first run-in with the Runts.


Li'l Ze with the Runts:

Li'l Zé: Where do you want to take the shot? In the hand or in the foot. [To Steak: Go on, choose one and shoot. Kill one of them. I wanna see what you're made of.

[Steak shoots one of the kids dead] Li'l Ze: Well done! You did it. You're one of us.

...

Buscapé: What should have been swift revenge turned into an all out war. The City of God was divided. You couldn't go from one section the other, not even to visit a relative. The cops considered anyone living in the slum a hoodlum. People got used to living in Vietnam. And more and more volunteers signed up to die

...

Cabeleira: Hey, Bernice. Listen, I've got something real important to say. Tell me, you ever heard of love at first sight?
Berenice: Sure, but hoods don't fall in love, they just get horny.
Cabeleira: C'mon, you cut everything I say to pieces.
Berenice: Hoods don't talk, they just vomit words.
Cabeleira: Jesus, I'm gonna stop wasting my saliva on you, you sure ain't easy.
Berenice: Hoods never stop, they just take a break.

...

Buscapé: It was like a message from God: "Honesty doesn't pay, sucker."

...

Buscape [narrating]: The first time Knockout Ned saved a salesclerk from being killed by Carrot.
Ned: We said no killing! That's the rule.
Buscape [narrating]: The second time, Carrot saved Knockout Ned''s life by killing a man about to kill him. Ned learned that there's an exception to every rule. The third time the exception becomes the rule.


Knockout Ned becomes one of the hoods he despised

Ned: The war's on. Let's start with a prayer.
Buscape: A year later, no one remembered how the war had all begun.

...

Runt 1: The big deal is dope, you got it?
Runt 2: If you wanna be a dealer, you gotta start as a delivery boy, see?
Runt 1: This delivery boy business is real bullshit. The time it takes being a delivery boy, then security and then manager, is way too long.
Runt 2: What you gonna do? You've gotta wait for them to die...

...

Li'l Ze: They're all dealers. They're all fucking loaded. Hold-ups bring in chickenshit. The big bucks are in dope. Especially in selling coke.
Benny: I see. But you need money.
Li'l Ze: Not really. We'll kill all these clowns and take over their business.
Benny: When do we start.
Li'l Ze: Now.

...

Buscape: This picture of the hood will guarantee my salary. This one will make me famous. It'll even make the cover of a magazine. I won't have to worry about Li'l Ze anymore. But the police?


The film ends with some Runts walking down the street:

"Cocoa robbed 3 houses in Barra"
"Better kill him"
"Who shot Roger?"
"It was Beef"
"Kill that fucker"
"We should kill the Chief and Gringo as well"
"What about Cherry?"
"Let's go. Us two and 3 others"
"It's a deal"
"Have you heard of the Red Brigrade?"
"No, but if they come, we'll kill them"
"Who knows how to write?"
"Me, sort of"
"Let's make a black list. We'll kill them all"
"Put fucking Nightowl on there"
"And Crochet"
"Leonard too, he owes me money"
"And China-Man, he thinks he's hot stuff"


And all of these kids are prepubesent.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Thu Jul 26, 2012 2:33 am

Truly, a city of men. So much of what some construe as "senseless violence" here is rooted in testosterone. And poverty. And class. Gangs are a way to embed dasein in a ritual of necessity. Identity revolves around the gang "family".

Right, and try explaining that to them.

It's always a power struggle over who gets to say what things mean. And where all of the others get to fit into that.

CITY OF MEN
Fernando Meirelles

Tina: It's getting bad, let's split.
Midnight: No way! We're gonna kill the motherfuckers.
Tina: They have machine guns! They'll massacre us!

...

Fasto: Fuck you all! The hill is mine!!

...

Midnight: When we get more guns, we'll take the hill back.

...

Ace: Good morning, sir.
Boss: You were late again. The place was unattended.
Ace: There was gang war on the hill.
Boss: That's your problem, not mine.
Ace: It was a real war. You probably saw it on TV.
Boss: Your fired. Go collect your pay.

...

Wallace: Come on, Ace. Am I not your friend? I'm not your friend? Then shoot me. Shoot me.
[Ace lowers the gun]
Wallace: Let's get out of here. If you die, your son will be like us. Fatherless. Is that what you want?

...

Ace [in a letter to his wife] I don't know how long it will be. But now you're in there and I'm out here, away from the place where I was born, the place where everyone knows me, where everyone knows who I am, away from the place that used to be mine.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Thu Jul 26, 2012 9:38 pm

There's no working class quite like the British working class. If for no other reason they've been at it longer than most.

ALL OR NOTHING
Written and directed by Mike Leigh

Phil: ...she might have done you a favor.
Ron: How do you mean?
Phil: Well, if it hadn't have happened, you might have driven around the next corner and killed a little kid...It's what's-its-name, fickle finger of fate. If you knew what was gonna happen to you when you woke up in the morning you might never get out of bed....That's life. The old clock ticks, the world turns around, the tide comes in, tide goes out. You're born, you die. That's it.
Ron [oblivious]: What's your missus make at Safeway?

...

Penny: What have you got there?
Phil: Burger buns. Three dozen.
Penny: We ain't gonna eat all them.
Phil: No, it's all right. They're long life.
Penny: What's the expiry date?
Phil: 24th of October.
Penny: That's four months away. What have they got in 'em?
Phil: Dunno. Chemicals.

...

Phil: Picked up at a doctor's surgery at dinner time. Old bloke, only wanted to go to the next street. I says, 'Sorry, mate, I got to charge you... 'the minimum fare, L3.50 .
Penny: You shouldn't have charged him nothing.
Phil: No, I know. I said, 'Call it a couple of quid.'
Penny: No, you should have called it nothing.
Phil: He wasn't having it, you know? He insisted on giving me the full fare.
Penny: You didn't have to take it, though, did you?
Phill: No. But... it's his what's-its-name.
Rachel: Dignity.
Phil: Yeah. No price on that when you're old.

...

Cecile: And your son? He work with you in the taxi?
Phil: Nah, he don't do nothin'.
Cecile: Beg your pardon? How he don't do nothing?
Phil: He does a lot of nothing.

...

Cecile: Do you love your wife?
Phil: Yeah. Oh, yeah. It's funny, isn't it? What's-her-name, love. It's like a dripping tap. Bucket's either half full... or it's half empty. If you're not together, you're alone. You're born alone... and you die alone. Nothing you can do about it.
Cecile: You are right. It is fucking lonely.

...

Phil: Has he had an operation?
Penny: No.
Phil: I got lost downstairs. Bloke said, 'Go upstairs...'.
Penny: All right, Phil, you're here now, ain't you?
Phil: What happened?
Penny: Well, he collapsed. Maureen was with him when I come up here. He's got to take pills for the rest of his life.
Phil: You never know what's going to happen, do you? It's wossername...fait accompli. He might win the lottery tomorrow. It's kismet, isn't it?
Penny: What are you talking about?!

...

Phil: I'm determined to do it. Got to get started, get saving. Shouldn't take long. I'll work seven days a week. Start early, finish late. Do nights, weekends...
Penny: Phil, Rory's in hospital!
Phil: Yeah. Sorry. But I made him a promise, and I'm gonna keep it.
Penny: What promise?
Phil:About going on holiday.
Penny: Phil, it ain't about goin' on holiday. It's about gettin' by week in, week out. It ain't a game! Just 'cause you suddenly got some bee in your bonnet... about gettin' up in the mornings and goin' to work... when you've been lying in bed for years till God knows what time! And we're all supposed to be grateful... because you decided to do what normal people do. I get up in the mornings. Rachel gets up in the mornings. You make me sick!!

...

Penny: Your son's in the hospital having a heart attack... and we can't get hold of you. They know where I am in an emergency but we can't get hold of his dad nowhere. Where was you? What have you been doing all day?
Phil: I switched it off.
Penny: I know you switched it off. Why'd you switch it off? I'd had enough. You'd had enough? Had enough of what? Working for five minutes, so you switched it off? What can I switch off when I've had enough? Had enough of getting up every morning, going to work... doing the shopping, coming home, cooking the tea... cleaning the house, doing the ironing... making sure everyone's got clean clothes on their back. What can I switch off when I've had enough? Had enough of what, anyway?
Phil [quietly] Everything.
Penny: What everything? For God's sake, Phil.
Phil: You don't love me no more, do you?
Penny: What?
Phil: You don't love me.
Penny: Phil, what are you talking about? What's that got to do with anything?
Phil: It's got to do with everything....You ain't loved me for years. You don't like me, you don't respect me... you talk to me like I'm a piece of shit.


Then it evolves [or devolves] from there. Depending on the political spin you give it.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Fri Jul 27, 2012 5:19 pm

Here the old world meets the new world. But in the new world there are so many different ways to narrate the story. Not all of them legal. Nor easy to explain.

HEAD-ON [Gegen die Wand]
Written and directed by Fatih Akin

Dr. Schiller: If you want to end your life, end it. You don't have to kill yourself to do that.

...

Cahit: You won't die that way.
Sibel: What do you mean?
Cahit: You gotta cut along the vein, not across it. Across is shit.

...

Sibel's brother: Hey, brother-in-law you should come with us some time.
Cahit: Where to?
Sibel's brother: The brothel.
Cahit: What would I want there?
Sibel's brother: What a question!
Cahit: Why don't you fuck your own wives?
Sibel's brother [shocked] What did you say?
Cahit: Why don't you fuck your own wives?
Sibel's brother [enraged]: Don't ever use the word "fuck" in connection with our wives!

...

Cahit: I'm sorry I ran off before. I apologise.
Sibel: That's okay.
Cahit: I'm just a mental case, y'know?
Sibel: Aren't we all?

...

Sibel: They'll kill me.
Mann: Who?
Sibel: My family.

...

Sibel [now in Turkey] accosts two men in a restaurant: Listen guys where can I get some drugs?
Man [incredulous]: Are you out of your mind?

...

Sibel [in a letter to Cahit]: ....God is putting us to the test. God? I don't know what I'm supposed to believe after all of this. You pulled the short straw, but jail is the only thing I can compare my life to here.

...

Cahit: Where is your sister?
Sibel's brother: I have no sister now.
Cahit: You have the same mother. What does your mother think?
Sibel's brother: We had to save our honor. Don't you see?
Cahit: And? Did you save it, your honor?

...

Cahit: When I met Sibel first time I was dead. I was dead long time before I met her. I'd lost myself. Then she come and drop in my life. She gives me love...and she gives me power. Do you understand that? Do you understand that? How strong you are Selma. Are you strong enough to stay between me and her?
Selma: Are you strong enough to destroy her life?
Cahit: No. I'm not.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Fri Jul 27, 2012 9:03 pm

Based on a true story. On the other hand, so much regarding America's involvement in Vietnam revolves around big fucking lies. Personally, I lost count of them after Cam Ranh Bay.

RESCUE DAWN
Written and directed by Werner Herzog

Duane: You're a strange bird, Dieter. A man tries to kill you and you want his job

...

Dieter: No, I never wanted to go to war. I just wanted to fly.

...

Dieter: [on his birthday] What kind of champagne is this?
Gene: You just got to keep thinking protein, lots of protein.
Duane: It's not bad. Squished insect larva.
Gene: Protein...

...

Duane: Be quiet!
Dieter: What?
Duane: Quiet.
Dieter: Why? I'm whispering.
Duane: Little Hitler's coming.
Dieter: Who?
Duane: Shh! Little Hitler!
Dieter: Who's Little Hitler?


He finds out:

Dieter: Now what the hell is this? The Middle Ages?
Duane: Hey, listen. Don't mess with these guys. You'll regret it.

...

Duane: The jungle is the prison, don't you get it?

...

Duane: You won't make it out of camp. There are six guards posted during the day.
Dieter [chuckling]: Yeah. That is during the day. I'm going at night. [Duane smirks]. Why? What happens at night?


He finds out.

Gene: Where am I gonna go? Where am I goona go?

...

Dieter: Which one of your feet is the worst off?
Duane: That's a trick question, right?

...

Duane: I'm done.
Dieter: No. We'll travel by night...
Duane: No, I'm telling you, I can't go any further...just leave me here.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Sat Jul 28, 2012 3:28 am

Based on the true story of the Papin sisters: Class struggle, God, incest, murder.

MURDEROUS MAIDS [Les blessures assassines]

Lea: If we were rich...
Christine: What would change? Rich ladies have everything but I've seen them weeping in secret.

...

Mother: What's the matter now? Praying again? Answer me!
Christine: I've decided to be a nun, like Emilia.
Mother [slapping her hard across the face]: Never! You'll slave for others like I did!

...

Christine [to Lea on her first day at work]: 7:20 - Prepare Monsieur's tray: coffee, cold milk, toast...7:30 - Take up the tray with the paper....9:30 - Bed....We could add: "Take a few minutes to pee." [they giggle]

Remember this: "Yes, Madame. No Madame. Yes, Monsieur. No, Monsieur". Forget their surname. And always speak to them in third person. Aunt Isabelle said a master is three people: the one he is, the one others think he is and the one he believes he is. Always address the last one.

...

Lady of the house [to Christine]: I see you're satisfied with what I gave you. That's good. That confirms my opinion. Convent girls are well brought up. The nuns teach you to respect property.

...

Lea: God, please stop this!


He doesn't.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Sat Jul 28, 2012 9:25 pm

The narrative of choice: Beauty--->Art--->Action--->Harmony of pen and sword

[yeah, right]

In the end, Mishima's harmony -- "purity" -- becomes just one more futile assault on capitalism. On a modern world sans God.

MISHIMA: A LIFE IN FOUR CHAPTERS
Directed by Paul Schrader

Mishima: When I examined my early childhood I see myself as a boy leaning at the window forever watching a world I was unable to change forever hoping it would change itself.

...

Mishima: In my earliest years, I realized life consisted of two contradictory elements. One was words, which could change the world. The other was the world itself, which had nothing to do with words.

...

Interrogator: You're still too young and pure. You will learn to tone down your feelings.
Isao: If purity is toned down, it's no longer purity.
Interrogator: Total purity is not possible in this world.
Isao: Yes, it is! If you turn your life into a line of poetry written in a splash of blood.

...

Mishima: All my life I have been acutely aware of a contradiction in the very nature of my existence. For forty-five years I struggled to resolve this dilemma by writing plays and novels. The more I wrote, the more I realized mere words were not enough. So I found another form of expression.

...

Mishima: My need to transform reality was an urgent necessity, as important as three meals a day or sleep.

...

Osamu: The guys at the theatre are even worse. They're still having the same boring discussions about the "wounds of art"....They don't even know that art is a shadow...that stage blood is not enough.

...

Mishima: Words are a deceit. In order to transform reality, the writer must be deceitful. But action is never deceitful. "The harmony of pen and sword". This samuri motto used to be a way of life. Now it's forgotten. Can art and action still be united?

...

Mizoguchi: [stuttering] It was as s-small as this, but grew so big... it filled the world like... tremendous music. That's the p-p-power of beauty's eternity. It poisons us. It blocks out our lives.
Mariko: Please, enough of your pride! Beauty is like a rotten tooth. It rubs against your tongue, hurting, insisting on its importance. Finally you go to a dentist and have it pulled. Then you look at the small bloody tooth in your hand and say, "Is that all it was?" That's the way it is.

...

Mariko: Only knowledge can turn life's unbearableness into a weapon.


[On the other hand, as Mishima learns, a certain knowledge of life may well make it unbearable]

...

Mishima: The average age for a man in the Bronze Age was eighteen, in the Roman era, twenty-two. Heaven must have been beautiful then. Today it must look dreadful. When a man reaches forty, he has no chance to die beautifully. No matter how he tries, he will die of decay. He must compel himself to live.

...

Mishima [in narration after his "purity" speech is met with scorn and derision from the very soldiers he wishes to sway]: Body and spirit had never blended. Never in physical action had I discovered the chilling satisfaction of words. Never in words had I experienced the hot darkness of action. Somewhere there must be a higher principle which reconciles art and action. That principle, it occured to me, is death.


The rest is almost unbearable to watch.

Mishima: Long live the emperor! Long live the emperor! Long live the emperor!

Then seppuku.
Last edited by iambiguous on Sun Jul 29, 2012 12:40 am, edited 1 time in total.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Sun Jul 29, 2012 12:38 am

HIGH PLAINS DRIFTER:
Directed by Clint Eastwood

Mordecai: What about after?
The Stranger: Hmm?
Mordecai: What about after we kill them? What do we do then?
The Stranger: Then you live with it.

...

Sarah: Be careful. You're a man who makes people afraid, and that's dangerous.
The Stranger: It's what people know about themselves inside that makes 'em afraid.

...

Preacher: See here, you can't turn all these people out into the night. It is inhuman, brother. Inhuman!
The Stranger: I'm not your brother.
Preacher: We are all brothers in the eyes of God.
The Stranger: All these people, are they your sisters and brothers?
Preacher: They most certainly are.
The Stranger: ...Then you won't mind if they come over and stay at your place, will ya?


A short while later...

Preacher [to hotel guests]: Friends, friends, don't worry. We shall find haven for you in our own homes... [pause] ...and it won't cost you one cent more than regular hotel rates.

...

The Stranger: I'd like rifles and ammunition for everyone in the regiment.
Gunsmith: What regiment?
The Stranger: The city of Lago volunteer force
Gunsmith: Never heard of it
The Stranger: Well you oughta, you're in it.

...

Stacey: I just want enough time to take one year out of my life back from Lago.
Cole: How long you reckon that'll take?
Stacey: [grinning] For some of 'em; a lifetime.

...

Lewis: I got 18 people in my hotel! Where are they gonna go?
The Stranger: Out.

...

Stacey [shouting out into the unknown]: Who are you?!....[then bewildered] Who are you...
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Sun Jul 29, 2012 4:17 pm

People are strange, but some people are stranger than others. Of course when you are young and beautiful others tend to make allowances. Or they fall in love with you.

Oh, and what we do we do because of what we think we know. But that may have nothing at all to do with what is true.

THE BRIDESMAID [La demoiselle d'honneur]
Directed by Claude Chabrol

Message on Senta's phone: I'm not available. Do the best you can.

...

Philip: Have you tried two men at once?
Senta: I've tried everything.

...

Senta: Are you sure you love me?
Philip: Of course. Of course I love you. Like I've never loved anyone before.
Senta: Then do something to prove it.
Philip: Sure. What?
Senta: I've been thinking about it. We'll each do something tremendous to prove our love.
Philip: What do I have to do?

...

Senta: You don't see things as they are yet. You still don't see we're very special people. That we're above everything. Laws. Morality. But I know you will realize it. You'll cut loose from all the pettiness weighing us down. You'll see the world as it really is. As something mystical. Magical. You've taken a step towards that by killing for me.


Lust becomes love and the constraints fall away. But it is not what Philip [or Senta] thinks it is at all. In any event, she kills the wrong man.

Philip: Senta, you did it. You really killed someone.
Senta: I told you I did. I killed for you.
Philip: But it wasn't Gerard, it was someone who had nothing to do with this!
Senta: So what? I killed for you. Just like you killed for me.


Unless, of course, he didn't.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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And here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=194382
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