RNA

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RNA

Postby Pedro I Rengel » Mon Jan 31, 2022 3:01 am

I'm just going to say this once, for the record.

RNA is genetic material. It is replicable and holds code which produces proteins which make up an organism. In the case of plants, it is 100% of what does this. In every cell of a tree are RNA molecules.

In the case of animals, every cell also has another type of molecule, DNA. DNA is two strands of RNA attached to eachother.

Mammal reproduction happens by sperm and ovarian cells, which experience a splitting of their DNA strands into RNA to reattatch to the split RNA strand of the other cell. These DNA molecules form cells around themselves, and replicate other molecules which generate new cells. All of these cells can also contain whatever native RNA existed in the host organism. Any active RNA in the sperm and ovarian cells at the moment of reproduction can also replicate, and form part of the newly generated cells.

In animals, protein creation happens when either DNA split into RNA strands, or native RNA strands, attract enzymes to their extremities that bind into proteins. What is known as mRNA, or messenger RNA, is a strand of RNA that has been split from a DNA molecule.

When a foreign RNA molecule is introduced into the cell, it can functionally be called mRNA if it performs the same functions as actual mRNA, split from a DNA molecule, but is in fact more like a native RNA molecule in essence.

In the vaccines that use mRNA technology, the introduced RNA molecules are said to be self-terminating, that is, it is said that they self-terminate after imitating the function of an mRNA mollecule. This is possible, but it is not innate in the function of RNA. A molecule of RNA introduced into a cell has no need to self-terminate. This mechanism would have to be chemically built-in. In other words, maybe they self-terminate, or maybe they don't, and can be passed on to new cells and eventually new organisms via sperm or ovarian cells.
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Re: RNA

Postby Mr Reasonable » Mon Jan 31, 2022 9:24 am

ok
pending
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Re: RNA

Postby Sculptor » Mon Jan 31, 2022 4:23 pm

Pedro I Rengel wrote:I'm just going to say this once, for the record.

RNA is genetic material. It is replicable and holds code which produces proteins which make up an organism. In the case of plants, it is 100% of what does this. In every cell of a tree are RNA molecules.

In the case of animals, every cell also has another type of molecule, DNA. DNA is two strands of RNA attached to eachother.

Mammal reproduction happens by sperm and ovarian cells, which experience a splitting of their DNA strands into RNA to reattatch to the split RNA strand of the other cell. These DNA molecules form cells around themselves, and replicate other molecules which generate new cells. All of these cells can also contain whatever native RNA existed in the host organism. Any active RNA in the sperm and ovarian cells at the moment of reproduction can also replicate, and form part of the newly generated cells.

In animals, protein creation happens when either DNA split into RNA strands, or native RNA strands, attract enzymes to their extremities that bind into proteins. What is known as mRNA, or messenger RNA, is a strand of RNA that has been split from a DNA molecule.

When a foreign RNA molecule is introduced into the cell, it can functionally be called mRNA if it performs the same functions as actual mRNA, split from a DNA molecule, but is in fact more like a native RNA molecule in essence.

In the vaccines that use mRNA technology, the introduced RNA molecules are said to be self-terminating, that is, it is said that they self-terminate after imitating the function of an mRNA mollecule. This is possible, but it is not innate in the function of RNA. A molecule of RNA introduced into a cell has no need to self-terminate. This mechanism would have to be chemically built-in. In other words, maybe they self-terminate, or maybe they don't, and can be passed on to new cells and eventually new organisms via sperm or ovarian cells.


Almost right.

mRNA vaccines use mRNA created in a laboratory to teach our immune cells how to make a protein—or even just a piece of a protein—that triggers an immune response inside our bodies. That immune response, which produces antibodies, is what protects us from getting infected if the real virus enters our bodies.
As the mRNA of the Vaccine is not human MRNA it does not and cannot interact or react with native germ cells, which are in any case chemically protected and only available for transcription with the correct bio-chemical signals which make the germ cells ready at conception.

Your problem summed up by the phrase: a little knowledge is a dangerous thing.
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Re: RNA

Postby Pedro I Rengel » Mon Jan 31, 2022 4:48 pm

I suppose one point is that mRNA designates an intended function, not a chemical composition. Chemically, it is simply RNA.

The intended function is outside the scope of what I had to say, and doesn't alter it. It is also, only a stated intended function. We are trying to get at what are actual knowable facts.

The second point is that whether it is human RNA or not is also a functional label. It is simply RNA. RNA, and even DNA, can and have been created in a laboratory that seamlessly integrate with the native molecules (like the famous experiment where a human ear is made to grow out of a mouse's back).

What the RNA does, and how it is constituted, is a matter of design and not innate to the structure of RNA.

Aything that is RNA that makes its way into a cell, can potentially be carried into other cells and eventually new organisms, via repruduction.
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Re: RNA

Postby Pedro I Rengel » Mon Jan 31, 2022 4:55 pm

Pedro I Rengel wrote:RNA is genetic material.
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Re: RNA

Postby Pedro I Rengel » Mon Jan 31, 2022 4:58 pm

In essence, technology that inserts inheritable RNA molecules into an organism exists. I am not sure why you think it doesn't.

Among other fields, it is used in forestry to make trees immune to known diseases.
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Re: RNA

Postby Pedro I Rengel » Mon Jan 31, 2022 5:01 pm

So, whether RNA in a vaccine will insert itself as a native RNA molecule, or be transmitted to new organisms via reproduction, or not, what is known is that it can.

As long as it is RNA, it is genetic.
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Re: RNA

Postby iambiguous » Mon Jan 31, 2022 5:37 pm

Of course, most of us here have to fall back on the "experts" -- folks who have both the education and the background to understand all of this scientifically, biologically, medically.

On the other hand, there are those here who insists that, in regard to the covid pandemic, Big Pharma employs these experts solely in order to make tons and tons of money in providing dangerous vaccines against it. And then those here who argue that Big Brother -- liberals and/or Commies -- employ these experts solely in order to, among other things, plant chips inside the Rugged Individualists among us in order to turn them into slaves of the NWOGS...the New World Order Globalist State.

Go ahead, ask them to provide the BitChute video that proves this.

And the supreme irony continues to be that only way you can call yourself a Rugged Individualist, is to think exactly like they do about it.
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Re: RNA

Postby Pedro I Rengel » Mon Jan 31, 2022 5:46 pm

iambiguous wrote:Of course, most of us here have to fall back on the "experts" --


https://books.google.com/
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Re: RNA

Postby iambiguous » Mon Jan 31, 2022 5:50 pm

Pedro I Rengel wrote:
iambiguous wrote:Of course, most of us here have to fall back on the "experts" --


https://books.google.com/


Ah, The Corner mentality! And who here is more an expert on that rendition of the Rugged Individualist. :lol:
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

Start here: http://www.ilovephilosophy.com/viewtopi ... 1&t=176529
Then here: http://www.ilovephilosophy.com/viewtopi ... 5&t=185296
And here: http://www.ilovephilosophy.com/viewtopi ... 1&t=194382

"Sure, it works in practice, but does it work in theory?"

Danny Embling: "People wonder how Hitler managed to get so many followers...it's never surprised me."
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