Trump enters the stage

Discussion of the recent unfolding of history.

Re: Trump enters the stage - cognative dissonance

Postby Meno_ » Sat Oct 10, 2020 7:41 pm

Fatalists point to the post modern signs which are not contained in bubbles that fill a wide array of prognostic allusion to the book of revelation. They cannot point to confirmation to events, grotesquely immediate, as the completion of the rebuilding of the 2nd temple. equivocates within the larger bubble of biblical prophesy.

It's like not sensing the similar equivocation that I mentioned , between Joshua and Jesus, which have identical meanings.

Cognitive dissonance , for an acting president , is a very resourceless attempt to minimize the preponderant similarity, in laymen's terms to that, which stymies that possibility.

We can really return and absolve ourselves in a spiritual bubbly time machine.




"Trump delivers dark and divisive speech in first major appearance since Covid diagnosis




(CNN)A defiant President Donald Trump is resuming public events Saturday with a divisive speech at the White House, where he's potentially putting lives at risk once again, just nine days after he revealed his own Covid-19 diagnosis.

After being sidelined from the campaign trail for more than a week, Trump is leaning into his law-and-order message to reject what he's calling "a campaign of slander against our police from left-wing politicians and liberal pundits."

Although Trump looks to be playing to his base, the event is purportedly aimed at Black and Latino Americans, who, he's arguing, are benefiting from his agenda.

With just three weeks to go until an election in which he's trailing badly in the polls, Trump is deploying familiar scare tactics.

Though members of the audience are mostly Black Americans -- members of a group known as "BLEXIT" that was founded by conservative firebrand Candace Owens to encourage African Americans to leave the Democratic Party -- the lines of Trump's speech seem clearly aimed at White suburbanites who are not sympathetic to the Black Lives Matter movement.

"If the left gains power, they will launch a nationwide crusade against law enforcement," Trump said.

While some Democrats have joined calls for a radical shift in police policy, including a reduction in police budgets, top congressional Democrats and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden have not supported calls to "defund the police."

Just as the US sees an upward trend in hospitalization rates, Trump invited some 2,000 people for the speech from a White House balcony, in just the latest sign that his staff and doctors are acquiescing to his desires rather than following public health guidelines and common sense.

The large gathering follows Trump's acknowledgment during a televised interview with Fox News Friday that he may have contracted the virus at one of the recent events at the White House. It's unknown whether he's still contagious, but Trump gave an incomprehensible answer about his latest coronavirus test results Friday.

"I haven't even found out numbers or anything yet, but I've been retested and I know I'm at either the bottom of the scale or free," Trump told Fox News' medical analyst Dr. Marc Siegel on "Tucker Carlson Tonight." "They test every couple of days, I guess, but it's really at a level now that's been great -- great to see it disappear."

CNN Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta noted that the Fox interview offered very little clarity about Trump's level of contagion and said that if the President had a simple answer about testing negative, he would have given it: "They are being purposely vague on this, but I think they're trying to track his viral load," Gupta said on "Cuomo Prime Time."

View Trump and Biden head-to-head polling

Americans are still in the dark about the date of Trump's last negative test for Covid-19. But as Trump taped the Fox interview, he said he had stopped taking medicine eight hours earlier. But he also underscored the seriousness of his illness when he acknowledged that scans of his lungs in the hospital had shown congestion and that he took the steroid dexamethasone because it keeps "the swelling down of the lungs."

White House doctors have not spoken directly to the press since Trump left Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Monday, and his doctor did not reveal his temperature in the latest statement on his vitals Thursday. Trump's physician, Navy Cmdr. Dr. Sean Conley, said in his Thursday statement that Saturday would be day 10 since Trump's diagnosis and based on unspecified tests that the team was conducting, "I fully anticipate the President's safe return to public engagements at that time."

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says on its website that patients with mild or moderate illness are infectious for up to 10 days, while those with "severe to critical illness" could remain infectious up until 20 days after the onset of symptoms. The medications that Trump received have suggested serious illness to many of the doctors interviewed by CNN.

Judge Amy Coney Barrett walks to the microphone after President Donald Trump, right, announced Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

No evidence of change to White House protocols

Still, the President's illness does not appear to have changed the safety protocols adopted by the White House or Trump's campaign, even though Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's top infectious disease specialist, said on Friday that it's now clear that Trump's Rose Garden ceremony for his Supreme Court nominee, Amy Coney Barrett, two weeks ago was a "superspreader event."

"We had a super spreader event in the White House," Fauci told CBS News Radio on Friday. "It was in a situation where people were crowded together, were not wearing masks. So the data speak for themselves."

Attendees at Saturday's White House event must bring masks and will be subject to temperature checks, a source with knowledge of the planning told CNN. But while Trump said he may have contracted the virus at the White House, he made no mention of masks when Siegel asked him about the lessons he has learned from contracting the coronavirus. Cases are now rising in 28 states, and Friday marked a record number of new coronavirus cases worldwide -- more than 350,000 in a single day, according to the World Health Organization.

"They had some big events at the White House and perhaps there," he said when Siegel asked where he thought he contracted the virus. "I don't really know. Nobody really knows for sure. Numerous people have contracted it, but you know people have contracted it all over the world. It's highly contagious."

Trump said his main takeaway from his illness was that Covid patients should seek medical treatment as soon as they detect possible symptoms.

"I think the secret for me was I got there very early," Trump said during the Siegel interview, acknowledging that many Americans do not have the same level of medical care or access to doctors that he does. "I think going in early is a big factor in my case."

But when it comes to preventing the spread of the disease, the White House still seems to be flouting basic public health precautions, with their Saturday protocol not looking much different from the September 26 Rose Garden event where at least 12 people who attended -- including former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, who was released from the hospital Saturday after a week-long stay -- have contracted the virus, forcing the White House to empty out after aides went into quarantine.



Biden enters final weeks in commanding position as Trump wastes precious days

The Commission on Presidential Debates on Friday canceled the second debate, which was scheduled for next Thursday, after the President declined to do a virtual debate despite concerns over his Covid-19 diagnosis, organizers said.

Trump went ahead and announced a rally in Florida on Monday, even though at least nine people who attended Trump's September 18 rally in Bemidji, Minnesota, according to Kris Ehresmann, the state's infectious disease director.

"Nine cases reported attending the rally. One case was known to be infectious," Ehresmann said. "There were two hospitalizations that were associated with that. One who is in intensive care and no deaths at this point."

That would normally be chilling news for any campaign to hear, but it has not affected Trump's desire to get back out on the trail to receive adulation from his fans at a time when he is trailing Democratic nominee Joe Biden by 11 points in CNN's poll of polls.

He hasn't hesitated in the past to put his supporters or those who protect him at risk. The President endangered Secret Service agents at the height of his own illness -- traveling with them in an SUV to thank supporters who were cheering for him outside Walter Reed.

The agents wore medical gowns, masks and eye protection as they escorted him on the unnecessary trip out of the hospital, but Trump still defended that much-criticized photo op during his Fox appearance with Siegel.

"After two days I said, 'You know I want to go out and say hello to the people,' and I went to the Secret Service -- and these are the people that are with me all the time -- and they said, 'We have no problem sir,'" Trump claimed in Friday's interview on Fox.

CNN's Kevin Liptak, however, has reported that members of the Secret Service have expressed escalating concern about the disregard for their well-being in the midst of a deadly pandemic.

One current Secret Service agent who works on the presidential and first family detail said, "That never should have happened."

"We're not disposable," the agent told CNN.

Trump offers widely varying descriptions of his illness

As medical experts try to assess the risks to Trump's supporters with the planned White House and Florida events this weekend and next week, the President's own descriptions of how serious his case of coronavirus became have varied wildly this week.

On Monday, as he returned from Walter Reed medical center, Trump implored Americans not to be afraid of the coronavirus or let it "dominate you" and said, "You're gonna beat it."

On Friday, in the midst of a blitz of interviews with friendly news outlets, he said on the Rush Limbaugh radio show that he might not have recovered if he had not received the monoclonal antibody treatment from Regeneron.



Republicans start to distance from Trump

"I was in not great shape and we have a medicine that that healed me, that fixed me," Trump said on the show. "It's a great medicine. I mean I feel better now than I did two weeks ago. It's crazy. And I recovered immediately, almost immediately. I might not have recovered at all from Covid."

On Friday in the Fox interview, Trump also acknowledged that many people have died from Covid and that the pandemic had been very painful for many American families. But in a moment of cognitive dissonance, he seemed not to realize the lives he could be jeopardizing with his return to the campaign trail.

Biden clearly plans to make it a campaign issue in the coming days. During an event in Las Vegas Friday, he criticized the President's "reckless personal conduct" and said it was having "a destabilizing effect" on the government.

"He didn't take the necessary precautions to protect himself or others," Biden said. "The longer Donald Trump is President, the more reckless he gets. How can we trust him to protect this country?"





© 2020 Cable News Network. A Warner Media Company. All Rights Reserved.
Meno_
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 7257
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage. - The final weeks"""

Postby Meno_ » Sun Oct 11, 2020 4:55 pm

"Politics Newsletter

NEWS ANALYSIS

Taking Page From Authoritarians, Trump Turns Power of State Against Political Rivals

President Trump took a step even Richard M. Nixon avoided in his most desperate days: openly ordering direct, immediate government action against specific opponents, timed to serve his re-election campaign.


Oct. 10, 2020

President Trump’s order to his secretary of state to declassify thousands of Hillary Clinton’s emails, along with his insistence that his attorney general issue indictments against Barack Obama and Joseph R. Biden Jr., takes his presidency into new territory — until now, occupied by leaders with names like Putin, Xi and Erdogan.

Mr. Trump has long demanded — quite publicly, often on Twitter — that his most senior cabinet members use the power of their office to pursue political enemies. But his appeals this week, as he trailed badly in the polls and was desperate to turn the national conversation away from the coronavirus, were so blatant that one had to look to authoritarian nations to make comparisons."



© 2020 The New York Times Company
Meno_
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 7257
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage - steroid induced pasychosis?"

Postby Meno_ » Sun Oct 11, 2020 11:20 pm

Meno_
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 7257
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby MagsJ » Wed Oct 14, 2020 3:05 pm

Mowk wrote:What is the "real" toll on the earths population and you're worried about a prize? Are we making progress with our people getting on. Digging the life? All their greatest skills and capacities being fairly bartered for... in good faith?

Real mature of you.

#-o

..always ; )
The possibility of anything we can imagine existing is endless and infinite.. - MagsJ

I haven't got the time to spend the time reading something that is telling me nothing, as I will never be able to get back that time, and I may need it for something at some point in time.. Wait, What! - MagsJ

You’re suggestions and I, just simply don’t mix.. like oil on water, or a really bad DJ - MagsJ
User avatar
MagsJ
The Londonist: a chic geek
 
Posts: 20464
Joined: Wed Nov 01, 2006 2:59 pm
Location: Suryaloka/LDN Town

Re: Trump enters the stage - is the predictable brewing .?."

Postby Meno_ » Wed Oct 14, 2020 6:02 pm

"Voter suppression tactics against Black, Latino and Native commun...

Trump 'army' of poll watchers could frighten voters, incite violence, election officials warn

TREVOR HUGHES | USA TODAY | 20 minutes ago




Civil rights experts point to long wait times to vote as a sign of growing voter suppression in the U.S. Here's what to expect in the 2020 election.



Deep in the Democratic stronghold of Fairfax County, Virginia, about 50 of President Donald Trump's supporters gathered, wrapping themselves in American flags and waving Trump 2020 banners as they chanted: "Four more years! Four more years!"

It was Sept. 19, and the county had just begun early voting. The Republican volunteers stood on the sidewalk outside of the concrete Fairfax County government center building. Steps away, voters waited to cast their ballot while lined up on blue social distancing markers.

As the crowd grew — along with the chants — county elections officials began whisking the voters into the building, despite concerns of spreading COVID-19. County officials explained later that several voters felt threatened by the crowd, and requested escorts in and out of the polling place, even though the Trump volunteers had not violated any election laws.

"We were actually trying to encourage people to vote," said Sean Rastatter, 23, a software engineer and Fairfax County Republican who helped organize the event aimed at increasing GOP turnout. "The point of it was to remind people that early voting was taking place, since it had started a few days earlier. There wasn't anything close to voter intimidation." 

President Donald Trump's growing call for an "army" of supporters to "monitor" voting has raised concerns during an already vitriolic presidential election campaign about voter intimidation and suppression of minority groups.







Voting rights activists and government officials said they worry Trump's supporters will scare away Democratic voters fearful of confrontation with his supporters, including voters from Hispanic, Black, Asian and Indigenous communities who have been disproportionately hurt by the pandemic, ongoing police violence, immigration enforcement and growing rates of hate crimes under the Trump administration. 

“The rhetoric itself is suppressive," said Colorado Secretary of State Jena Griswold, a Democrat. “All of that taken together is aimed to suppress turnout. As elections officials, we have to clearly state that voter suppression is systemic racism."

Trump calls for an 'army'

In repeated tweets, speeches and paid advertisements, Trump and his campaign have called for an "army" of poll watchers to monitor contested election areas. "Fight for President Trump," reads one ad on Twitter, directing supporters to the website "ArmyForTrump.com."

Trump has repeatedly called the ongoing election "corrupt," which some election experts said is aimed at reducing confidence in the overall results and dissuading some voters from even bothering to cast a ballot. That favors Trump because his core supporters, who are older, white Americans, are the most consistent voters regardless of circumstance. And those voters are also the least likely to have to wait in long lines to cast a ballot.

Trump tweeted Friday that a mistake by an elections board in Ohio in sending out ballots to the wrong voters was further evidence of a "rigged election." The elections board said new ballots were being distributed, but Trump's tweet is the latest in what voting experts said is a concerted effort by the president and his supporters to cast doubt on the legitimacy of the election.

"My biggest concern, and both sides do this, is undermining confidence in elections across the board," Trey Grayson, a Republican and former Kentucky secretary of state, said in a call with journalists Tuesday. "We've got to have people trust the outcome. The losers have to believe it was a fair fight."

There have so far been few concrete examples of voter intimidation at polling sites. But the U.S. has a long history of violence against people of color during elections, including state and local lawmen attacking Black voting rights activists with nightsticks and tear gas in Alabama in 1965, which resulted in the passage that year of the federal Voting Rights Act.

Rastatter, the Republican from Fairfax County, said he'd never participate in anything that scared off voters. He said voter intimidation is a serious charge, and that police who investigated the incident declared no laws were broken.

"They're calling it out before it's even occurred," he said of the rally's critics. "This is one of these elections where people are so hyper partisan."



Vote by mail, early voting underway around the country

Fearful to vote

No one expects voter intimidation tactics to halt large numbers of voters from casting ballots. But experts said the even subtle shifts in voting patterns could change the outcome of elections.

During the 2000 presidential election, George W. Bush won Florida and its 25 Electoral College votes by just 537 votes.

Voter suppression could also shape races for state legislatures, which will next session use the 2020 Census results to map out election boundaries. In most states, whatever party controls the state legislature determines how those boundaries are drawn, and can use them to gerrymander favorable districts for Congress. 

“This is all, in my mind, to deter people from showing up at the polls," said Myrna Perez, director of New York University's Brennan Center for Justice's Voting Rights and Elections Program. "These statements are designed to make people fearful to vote."

Election experts said they are also worried about violence breaking out between the president's supporters and voters.

Mary McCord, a former top federal prosecutor focusing on national security and a professor at Georgetown Law School in Washington, D.C., said her biggest fear is that armed groups of right-wing Trump supporters will "self activate" in response to Trump's repeated calls to protect polling places.

Her concerns sharpened last week when Michigan state and federal prosecutors arrested 13 men they said were conspiring to kidnap Gov. Gretchen Whitmer. Prosecutors said the men discussed trying Whitmer for treason over her COVID-19 closures, which Trump also opposed. On April 17, Trump tweeted "LIBERATE MICHIGAN!" as part of a series of tweets criticizing both Whitmer, a Democrat, and pandemic-related lockdowns.

Monday was the first day for advance voting in Georgia and people showed up by the hundreds to cast their ballot early at the Bell Auditorium in Augusta, Ga., Oct. 12, 2020.



Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam, another Democrat and frequent Trump target, was also targeted by the same group, the FBI said Tuesday.

"Some people are just not very smart and buy into conspiracy theories. And some people are smart and they would happily disenfranchise voters," McCord said. "You can't ignore the disinformation coming straight from the president. He right now is the greatest threat to our democracy. And people do act on the things he says."

The concerns are building at least in part due to a rise in violent hate crimes under the Trump administration. The FBI last year said that while the overall number of hate crimes dropped slightly in 2018, the number of violent hate crimes hit a 16-year high -- from intimidation and assault to homicide. 

And the Department of Homeland Security in a report last month concluded that white supremacist extremists "will remain the most persistent and lethal threat in the Homeland." The reports comes two weeks after Trump's call during the first presidential debate for the far-right Proud Boys group to "stand back and stand by." While the White House later said Trump was condemning the group, its members quickly declared they were ready to follow his orders.

"I'm concerned they'll take the constant daily tweets about election fraud, that that's their signal, in their view, their license to self-activate," said McCord. "They put on this façade, these right-wing groups, that they are patriots and that they have an obligation to protect the vote or protect the election or protect the president."

Voter fraud? No. Suppression? Yes.

Elections experts said there's no evidence of Trump's repeated complaints about widespread voter fraud. But fair elections are under attack. 

Grayson, the former Kentucky election official who also served as president of National Association of Secretaries of State, said it's no secret politicians want to "shape the electorate." It's why liberal groups want to increase voting participation among people of color, because they tend to vote for Democrats, and why conservatives regularly target those same voters for suppression.

Until 2018, the Republican National Committee was forced to submit all of its poll-watching plans for review by a judge after getting caught hiring off-duty law enforcement officers and stationing them only in minority precincts during the 1981 New Jersey governor's election. Those armed officers wore "National Ballot Security Task Force" armbands and demanded Black or Latino voters show voting registration cards.

Denise and Bill Hasbune, of Stone Mountain, Ga., fill out a pre-registration form while waiting in line to vote Oct. 12, 2020 at the DeKalb County elections office in Decatur, Ga. The Hasbunes arrived before 6 a.m. because they said they wanted to be sure to exercise their right to vote and didn't want to take a chance of missing the opportunity.



That poll-watching consent decree expired in 2018. And in 2013, the Supreme Court eliminated a provision of the 1965 Voting Rights Act requiring areas with a history of discrimination to get federal approval before changing the rules. Fourteen states — all but one controlled by Republican legislatures — quickly toughened voter ID laws.

Republican operatives were also linked to the data-mining firm Cambridge Analytica during the 2016 presidential race, which targeted 3.5 million of Black Americans for "deterrence," according to an investigation by Channel 4 News in London. The report said operatives bought Facebook advertisements aimed at dissuading Black voters from casting a ballot, rather than trying to persuade them to pick one candidate over another.

While the federal government has typically taken the lead in enforcing the Voting Rights Act, some liberal activists worry the Trump administration's Justice Department lacks the interest to aggressively protect voting rights. 

"We understand there are folks who came before us who were literally risking their lives to vote," said Jamal Watkins, the NAACP's vice president of civic engagement. "This notion that violence is a ruse and not real -- it scares a lot of us."

Watkins said given the revelations about the role Cambridge Analytica played in dissuading Black voters, it's not surprising that turnout among Black voters dropped in 2016 for the first time in 20 years during a presidential election, falling to just below 60%, according to the Pew Research Center. Black voter turnout had previously hit a record high of 66.6% in 2012, when Democrat Barack Obama, the nation's only Black president, won a second term.

Meanwhile, a Brennan Center study found that 2018 wait times for Black and Hispanic voters averaged 45% longer than for white voters, a more subtle form of voter suppression than outright intimidation.

"We're not blind. We see there's an intentionality behind all of this. That's the sad truth," said Watkins. "This is not conspiracy theory. This is factual. We have seen it play out in what happened in 2016."

Voting advocates say Trump has brought intimidation to new levels

Some voting rights activists said they are worried Trump's call for poll monitors and violent rhetoric is setting an unprecedented tone.

Michael Steele, former chairman of the Republican National Party, said part of the problem stems from a misunderstanding of what it means to be a certified poll watcher, which is a legally defined role at the county level. He said the president can't just order supporters to look over voters' shoulder.

"You're not going to be allowed into the voting booth area, and you're not going to be allowed to intimidate voters who are standing in line waiting to go vote. But when you have someone of the president's authority saying something like that, rank-and-file Americans who support the president want to be helpful and will show up on Election Day and go 'well, I'm here to watch the polls,'" said Steele. "And then, of course, you run into the problem of some thickheads who want to come armed to the polls, which is nothing more than intimidation."

Six states and the District of Columbia explicitly ban guns at polling sites, and they're also generally banned inside polling places at schools or other public property. While using a firearm to intimidate someone is illegal, simply carrying it in public doesn't violate the law as long as the carrier maintains a certain distance from the polling site, usually 50 to 100 feet.



In Fairfax County, election officials said social-media videos provided a misleading perspective on the Trump rally, whose participants never got closer than 100 feet to the actual polling site. Still, voting-rights advocates said what happened there offers a glimpse into potential problems as more and more Americans begin voting in person. They said voting by mail or voting early are among the best ways to avoid Election Day polling problems. And lawyers across the country are prepared to defend voters in the courts, as needed.

“We need to be ready," Perez said. “Folks need to know their community, have a plan, be prepared for contingencies, and persist.”

Vanita Gupta, CEO of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, said "targeted harassment" is very much a concern this election.

"We have enough examples in recent memory where elections have been called in states on razor-thin margins. We need to make sure everyone eligible is able to cast a vote and have that vote counted," said Gupta, who led the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division under the Obama administration. "Every single vote does matter."

That's why it's critically important elections officials at all levels encourage every qualified voter to vote, said Griswold, the Colorado elections official. Like many of her colleagues, both Republican and Democrat, Griswold has repeatedly reassured voters that the process is safe, secure and trustworthy. Griswold said she particularly gets calls from Black community leaders every time Trump tweets or speaks about poll watchers.

"Voting is supposed to be the great equalizer for our communities," she said. “Every American deserves a democracy we can believe in. And that starts at the polls.”



© Copyright Gannett 2020
Meno_
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 7257
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage - no worries, the greatest show o

Postby Meno_ » Wed Oct 14, 2020 6:06 pm

MagsJ wrote:
Mowk wrote:What is the "real" toll on the earths population and you're worried about a prize? Are we making progress with our people getting on. Digging the life? All their greatest skills and capacities being fairly bartered for... in good faith?

Real mature of you.

#-o

..always ; )




No worries, most prizes are up the alley within politically inclusive swamps anyhow, so not to worry

Alfred e Newman
Meno_
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 7257
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage - no worries, the greatest show o

Postby MagsJ » Wed Oct 14, 2020 9:22 pm

Meno_ wrote:
MagsJ wrote:
Mowk wrote:Real mature of you.

#-o

..always ; )
No worries, most prizes are up the alley within politically inclusive swamps anyhow, so not to worry

Alfred e Newman

Meno_ wrote:"Voter suppression tactics against Black, Latino and Native commun...

Well that’s funny.. coz we don’t suppress anyone from voting where and whence I’m from.. well, you know.. apart from those that are trying to vote more than once and so commit fraud. :lol:

Fraudulent voting is a crime, is it not?
The possibility of anything we can imagine existing is endless and infinite.. - MagsJ

I haven't got the time to spend the time reading something that is telling me nothing, as I will never be able to get back that time, and I may need it for something at some point in time.. Wait, What! - MagsJ

You’re suggestions and I, just simply don’t mix.. like oil on water, or a really bad DJ - MagsJ
User avatar
MagsJ
The Londonist: a chic geek
 
Posts: 20464
Joined: Wed Nov 01, 2006 2:59 pm
Location: Suryaloka/LDN Town

Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Wed Oct 14, 2020 9:52 pm

MagsJ says:



"Fraudulent voting is a crime, is it not?"


Well, back in the day when more was merrier, yes, but now days , the less the more somber seems to predicate different values.

If my memory serves me right , it says recently suggested by the chief executive, that to balance democratic fraud-republicans should vote twice.

So Trump committed fraud by suggestion ( intent ) , but then again he subscribes to a higher standard

Seems like Trump is a closet royalist. and had he starred on the international stage, say a good 100-150 years ago, no mention of any of this would be noticeable in the press.

Gosh how things have changed since !
Meno_
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 7257
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby obsrvr524 » Wed Oct 14, 2020 11:57 pm

Meno_ wrote:Well, back in the day when more was merrier, yes, but now days , the less the more somber seems to predicate different values.

So you are saying that during a communist Marxist takeover attempt of the USA (a coup d'état), lying is not a crime? Certain "Deep State" Americans agree (James Comey, Hillary Clinton, Schumer, McCain, Shiff, Pelosi, Waters, Wray, Biden, and many others).

Meno_ wrote:If my memory serves me right , it says recently suggested by the chief executive, that to balance democratic fraud-republicans should vote twice.

Another lie but under communist Marxist takeover rules, such lying is okay, right?
              You have been observed.
obsrvr524
Thinker
 
Posts: 574
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 9:03 am

Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Mowk » Thu Oct 15, 2020 5:44 am

The fascist right doesn't seem to have any trouble with Trumps rather questionable grasp of the truth. But not all republicans lean that far right. Even the centrist republicans don't seem to have any difficulty at all with Trumps lies.

So it's a good question. Such lying does appear to be okayed by the right. And if the question is support for capitalism neither side has a great track record of policing truth in advertising.

Not for the gander, not for the goose.
Mowk
Philosopher
 
Posts: 2012
Joined: Thu Feb 02, 2012 8:17 pm
Location: In a state of excessive consumption

Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Thu Oct 15, 2020 10:42 pm

Mowk wrote:The fascist right doesn't seem to have any trouble with Trumps rather questionable grasp of the truth. But not all republicans lean that far right. Even the centrist republicans don't seem to have any difficulty at all with Trumps lies.

So it's a good question. Such lying does appear to be okayed by the right. And if the question is support for capitalism neither side has a great track record of policing truth in advertising.

Not for the gander, not for the goose.



So truth is relative to the interpretation. of differences incurred and efforts made between two similar but distinct categories , that arose between. 'Questionable grasp' and. out and out lying

I surmise, that is a sub-qualifier, that needs clarification , inter -alia.

That not too many can visually decipher such , below the surface, however establishing a definite point of contention-does not bar those, who would not be idisnclined to wallow in mud, rather then be accused of slinging it.

Reminds me of someone commenting on such behavior, as ' honey on the outside, chickenshit inside'


Course, whenever this is even hired at, the innards rise up again, as if is lintented as a humiliating affront.
How can anyone come to grips within such a diminished political theatre?

The child within us.........and so and so.
Meno_
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 7257
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Thu Oct 15, 2020 11:17 pm

.
Last edited by Meno_ on Thu Oct 15, 2020 11:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Meno_
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 7257
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage - where is the underground?

Postby Meno_ » Thu Oct 15, 2020 11:19 pm

[quote="obsrvr_"]obsrvr said:


"So you are saying that during a communist Marxist takeover attempt of the USA (a coup d'état), lying is not a crime? Certain "Deep State" Americans agree (James Comey, Hillary Clinton, Schumer, McCain, Shiff, Pelosi, Waters, Wray, Biden, and many others)."







On a nominal level, irrespective of what constitutes a lie, yes, a lie is absolutely reprehensible.

But there are mitigating situations, where a brazen black lie can turn to virginal white. These are the great vindicators , National Security is the most pre-eminent .

The cliche, 'would. you rather be red then dead' still echoes a late refrain?

How many people polled today would hold to it's opposite nowadays? 50-50? I would increase the odds within a reasonable margin to 20-80, even 85.

This is why, the national poll based on the vote is such an acute indication of common sentiment.

Reason: as the rich get richer af the expense of the middle classes, the drain is becoming visuble-creeping toward the upper middle classed.

Once that happens, and present indications are that they will,inordinate gaps will appear, that may be hard to fill.

I said it, then, 5 years ago, and I will say it agaun: trillion dollar hikdings, even at the cost of measurement of the entire wordily economy, will become self destructive.

Oh , not because, even higher unfair distributions on vastly larger scales have appeared through out history, but because
in the process of evolving collision between repression & humanism, the level of anticipated conflict will deconstruct the partial theaters of limited warfare.
Meno_
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 7257
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Mowk » Fri Oct 16, 2020 12:59 am

So truth is relative to the interpretation. of differences incurred and efforts made between two similar but distinct categories , that arose between. 'Questionable grasp' and. out and out lying


Not relative for the goose not relative for the gander. Truth is what it is and falsehood is not a truth. But I question whether Trump has actually lied. It seems to me you would have to have absolute knowledge of truth and intentionally spread falsehood in it's place to be called a lie. As far as truth is concerned where independent and collaborative validation is our best shot at achieving Truth, half truths that include misinformation are not a lie automatically; more an ignorance in belief and a willingness to proselytize it. What I am intending to say is that the unintentional disseminate of a falsehood is no lie. It is just ignorance and our first amendment seems to get rather fudged up when we mistake beliefs for truths. The first amendment also guarantees the right to ignorance, sadly enough.

That doesn't seem a way point any Nation would wish to dwell on in it's pursuit of a more perfect union.
Mowk
Philosopher
 
Posts: 2012
Joined: Thu Feb 02, 2012 8:17 pm
Location: In a state of excessive consumption

Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Fri Oct 16, 2020 2:50 am

Mowk wrote:
So truth is relative to the interpretation. of differences incurred and efforts made between two similar but distinct categories , that arose between. 'Questionable grasp' and. out and out lying


Not relative for the goose not relative for the gander. Truth is what it is and falsehood is not a truth. But I question whether Trump has actually lied. It seems to me you would have to have absolute knowledge of truth and intentionally spread falsehood in it's place to be called a lie. As far as truth is concerned where independent and collaborative validation is our best shot at achieving Truth, half truths that include misinformation are not a lie automatically; more an ignorance in belief and a willingness to proselytize it. What I am intending to say is that the unintentional disseminate of a falsehood is no lie. It is just ignorance and our first amendment seems to get rather fudged up when we mistake beliefs for truths. The first amendment also guarantees the right to ignorance, sadly enough.

That doesn't seem a way point any Nation would wish to dwell on in it's pursuit of a more perfect union.





Here is an interesting piece, verifying Your thoughts :



"In her essay Truth and Politics, published in The New Yorker in 1967, the philosopher Hannah Arendt was already lamenting the fact that politics and truth don’t mix. But even Arendt was aware that not all lies are the same. There are lies that are minimal forms of deception, a micro-tear in the fabric of reality, while some lies are so big that they require a complete rearrangement of the whole factual texture, a shift to another reality. In today’s terminology, Arendt was alerting us to the difference between a lie, and the 2016 Oxford Dictionaries Word of the Year – “post-truth”.

One way to understand the difference between lies and post-truth, which I’ve written about in a new paper, is that a liar denies specific facts that have precise coordinates in space and time, whereas post-truth questions the very nature of truth. A liar knows the truth, and, by trying to persuade us of an alternative narrative, a liar is paradoxically honouring the truth, whereas post-truth allows no last refuge for the truth.

Clinton versus Trump

This distinction between a lie and post-truth becomes more clear by comparing two recent American presidents, Bill Clinton and Donald Trump. At a White House press conference on January 26 1998, Clinton famously said:

I want to say one thing to the American people. I want you to listen to me. I’m going to say this again: I did not have sexual relations with that woman, Miss Lewinsky. I never told anybody to lie, not a single time; never.

Clinton’s statement, given the subsequent revelations and a semen-stained blue dress, is disconcerting. It’s possible that Clinton did not consider his intimate interactions with Lewinsky as a “sexual relation”, but that is unlikely – it would require a phenomenal effort of self-deception, or ingenuity, to defend that position with honesty and integrity. Clinton was impeached for perjury and obstruction of justice, because he lied under oath, but he was ultimately acquitted in a Senate trial.

Subverting truth itself

Clinton lied, and that was inexcusable. But Trump’s relationship with truth is even more disturbing, and dangerous. Trump’s incessant accusations of fake news against the main media outlets, including the Washington Post, The New York Times, and CNN, reflects a longstanding disdain for the truth. Unlike Clinton, Trump is not simply denying certain facts, instead he is determined to undermine the theoretical infrastructure that makes it possible to have a conversation about the truth.

Trump’s response and demeanour to the impeachment allegations made against him is a typical example of post-truth. By spurning the impeachment proceedings as a “charade” and a “witch-hunt”, his strategy is to create an environment where objective facts are less influential in shaping public opinion, where theoretical frameworks necessary to make sense of certain events are scorned, and where scientific truth is delegitimised."
Meno_
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 7257
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Fri Oct 16, 2020 5:51 pm

Nebraska Republican Senator Sassy said to day , that " there will be a Senate Republican bloodbath, if, Trump looses the election."



"Could you imagine if I lose?” he said. “I’m not going to feel so good. Maybe I’ll have to leave the country.."- Trump off the cuff , on the campaign trail.
Meno_
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 7257
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage - what? -

Postby Meno_ » Sun Oct 18, 2020 7:25 am

Trump continues bizarre appeals to suburban women as he campaigns in Covid hotspots





(CNN)If President Donald Trump loses his reelection bid in November, it will be in part because of his fundamental misunderstanding of the beliefs of "suburban women," whom he has tried to win back with a series of bizarre and racist appeals that seem more targeted to a stereotype from the 1950s and 1960s than the American women who actually live in those areas today.

Many of the female voters who have abandoned Trump recoil from his divisive language and disapprove of both his handling of race relations and the pandemic. But he has tried to convince them to support him through a campaign of fear and xenophobia, with claims about the Democratic agenda that plunge deep into the realm of the ridiculous and would be believed only by the most naïve, low-information voters.

His speech Saturday night in Michigan exemplified those political miscalculations when it comes to women he has referred to as the "suburban housewives of America" as he tried to create fear about crime from immigrants and argued that Joe Biden will upend life in the suburbs by putting public housing projects in the middle of leafy neighborhoods -- a reference to an Obama-era housing regulation aimed at ending segregation.

"Would you like a nice low-income housing project next to your suburban beautiful ranch style house? Generally speaking, no," Trump said in Muskegon. "I saved your suburbs -- women -- suburban women, you're supposed to love Trump," he said.

The President went on to make the ludicrous claim that Biden and Democrats want to overwhelm Michigan neighborhoods with refugees from Syria, Somalia and Yemen, and "poorly vetted migrants from jihadist regions."

Continuing his long-standing pattern of mocking women he perceives as opponents in sexist or misogynistic language — a tactic that does not go over well with women in either party — Trump attacked Democratic Gov. Michigan Gretchen Whitmer during the same rally, along with his 2016 opponent Hillary Clinton, and NBC's Savannah Guthrie, who moderated his Thursday night town hall.

Trump accused Whitmer, whom he has previously called "a dictator," of unnecessarily locking down her state as she fought the pandemic. That led his crowd to break into a chant of "Lock her up!" a little more than a week after federal authorities revealed a plot by extremists to kidnap Whitmer and overthrow the government.

Rather than condemning the derailed plot — which led to terrorism, conspiracy and weapons charges against more than a dozen men — or discouraging that kind of divisive language, Trump essentially endorsed the cheer with his authoritarian rhetoric about jailing his political opponents by adding Clinton and the Biden family into the mix.

"Lock them all up," Trump replied to the crowd.




He complained that Whitmer said publicly that his refusal to denounce White supremacists, extremists and hate groups has emboldened activists like those who allegedly planned the foiled attack against her.

"I guess they said she was threatened, right?" Trump said, seeming to doubt the specifics of the case and underplaying the violence it could have entailed. "She was threatened, and she blamed me — she blamed me, and our people were the ones that worked with her people, so let's see what happens."

Whitmer immediately responded on Twitter: "This is exactly the rhetoric that has put me, my family, and other government officials' lives in danger while we try to save the lives of our fellow Americans. It needs to stop." Her staff echoed that plea. "Every single time the President does this at a rally, the violent rhetoric towards her immediately escalates on social media. It has to stop. It just has to," her deputy digital director wrote on Twitter.

On Friday at a campaign event in Detroit, Biden condemned Trump for refusing to denounce White supremacist groups at the first debate and for criticizing Whitmer after the kidnapping plot was revealed.

"What the hell's the matter with this guy?" Biden said. "Attacking Governor Whitmer on the same day this plot was exposed. It's despicable."



At his rallies Friday night and Saturday, Trump also attacked Guthrie as angry and overly emotional during the NBC town hall.

"Her face -- the anger, the craziness," he said, describing how he viewed the dynamic during a speech to his supporters Friday night. As he doubled down on the trope of the hysterical woman, he added that he told Guthrie to "Take it easy. Relax."

Later in Janesville, Wisconsin, Saturday night, the President tried to undermine the credentials of the next female debate moderator, NBC News White House Correspondent Kristen Welker, by claiming that he'd known her "for a long time" and that "she is very unfair." The final presidential debate, which Welker will moderate, is on Thursday in Nashville, Tennessee.

It remains unclear if the President simply does not understand how those attacks on women could backfire at a time when millions of female voters are deciding whether to give him a second chance, or whether he simply can't resist engaging in those tactics because they rev up his crowds. Biden was up by 25 points among women voters in an average of the last five live interview polls, according to an analysis by CNN's Harry Enten. In the final pre-election polls in 2016, Hillary Clinton only had a 13-point edge among likely female voters.

"The fake news keep saying that suburban women don't like me because I don't sound nice," the President said. "I don't have time to be nice. I got a lot of work to do for you."

But his remarks have gone far beyond the limits of acceptable political discourse: he has referred to Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris as "a monster" and recently said of Clinton, "the glass ceiling broke her."

While returning to some of his old lines from the summer about how the radical left plans "to erase American history, purge American values and destroy the American way of life," Trump tried to revive the debate Saturday night over removing monuments that glorify American historical figures who were slave owners.

"This election will decide whether we preserve our magnificent heritage or whether we let far left radicals wipe it all away," he said. "They constantly smear America as a racist country. ... America is the most magnificent, most virtuous nation that has ever existed."

At one point, he described his joy in watching law enforcement authorities move in on crowds to prevent violence in Minneapolis after the protests against racial injustice.

"I don't know, there's something about that — when you watch everybody getting pushed around — there's something very beautiful about it. I don't care what I'm doing. Not politically correct ... But you people get it."

Trump campaigns as if the pandemic is over

Trump campaigned in Wisconsin and Michigan on Saturday while scarcely mentioning the coronavirus pandemic, despite the fact that cases are rising in a majority of states across the country.

Michigan's case count on Friday was the state's highest number of positive test results reported in one day, according to the state's Department of Health and Human Services.

Wisconsin also reported a new record high number of cases on Friday, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. The state's positivity rate was at 23.91% as of Saturday morning, according to the COVID Tracking project.

On Friday, US Surgeon General Jerome Adams said Wisconsin is one of the Covid-19 "red" states that federal officials are watching closely.

"Your positivity rates are over 10% and going in the wrong direction. Cases are in the red, going in the wrong direction," Adams said during a news conference in Wisconsin Friday. "It is critical that we actually understand where this virus is circulating so that we could get cases under control and reverse positivity."

Without laying out any specifics, Trump claimed Saturday that his plan "will crush the virus" and said his teams are working toward a safe vaccine and a "very rapid recovery."

He acknowledged at one point that some states are currently seeing spikes, but then downplayed those increases in cases as part of a typical pattern for the virus.

Trump said there had been a recent spike or surge in cases in states like Arizona and Florida, but then insisted that it went back down.

"You've got to open up," he said in Wisconsin. "You've got to get your place going."





© 2020 Cable News Network. A Warner Media Company. All Rights Reserved.
Meno_
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 7257
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage - preparing war games playbook

Postby Meno_ » Sun Oct 18, 2020 8:37 pm

On Point

 



This 'War Game' Maps Out What Happens If The President Contests The Election








Listen to our roundtable with former military officials here.

Did the president mean it when he told Fox News recently he might not accept the election results in November? What might happen if the results of the presidential election are contested? Former government officials from both parties held a “war game” to think through the consequences. We hear what they discovered.

Guests

Rosa Brooks, professor of constitutional and international law and national security at the Georgetown School of Law. Former Defense Department official. Co-founder of the Transition Integrity Project, which held the war game. (@brooks_rosa)

Ret. Col. Lawrence Wilkerson, former chief of staff to Secretary of State Colin Powell (2002-2005). Served 31 years in the U.S. Army. Adjunct professor of government and public policy at the College of William & Mary.



Interview Highlights

In June, Ret. Col. Lawrence Wilkerson joined us for a conversation about the use of the military amid protests against police brutality. During the conversation, Col. Wilkerson revealed he is part of two groups devoted to protecting the November elections: the National Task Force on Election Crises and the Transition Integrity Project. 

Below, Rosa Brooks, co-founder of the Transition Integrity Project, gives us some more detail about the goals and lessons of the project.  

On co-founding the Transition Integrity Project

Rosa Brooks: “I think a lot of people have been wondering in the back of their minds for a few years now, what would Donald Trump do if he lost? Would he leave? Or is he the kind of guy who would say, ‘The election was stolen. I actually won. It's fake news that I lost. I'm staying.’ And the seeds for the Transition Integrity Project were planted back last autumn. I was at a big dinner, one of those big D.C. dinners, and I was chatting with a federal appellate court judge, and a guy who was a corporate counsel at a big corporation.

"And I said idly as one does, I said, ‘Wow, what if Trump lost but wouldn't leave?’ And the federal judge said immediately, ‘Oh, no, that would never happen. The military would never let that happen.’ And the other guy said, ‘Oh, no, that would never happen. The Secret Service would never let that happen.’ And I thought, 'Wait, what? What do you mean the military would never let that happen? What do you mean by the military? What do you mean, wouldn't let that happen?’

"I had this sort of image of ... the Joint Chiefs of Staff are going to march across the Potomac from the Pentagon, you know, carrying a bunch of bazookas and head to the White House because I can't see that happening. And if it happened, it wouldn't really be a good thing. And the same for the Secret Service. You know, who exactly are we talking about? What mechanisms, what institutional mechanisms?

"And this conversation left me thinking, I think a lot of people have this false sense of security, that there exists some magic institution that in the event of President Trump doing something in defiance of the law, in defiance of democratic rule of law, norms would just kind of descend like the Gods and rescue America. But that's not really how people and institutions work. So the impetus for creating this project was to really find a way to talk in a more granular way about the what ifs.

"What would happen? And what would these actors do? With a view, obviously, not just towards scaring the heck out of everybody, which I think we are succeeding and doing, unfortunately. But, you know, primarily with a view towards figuring out how do we make those scary realities not come true? What can be done between now and November to make sure that America stays the America we want it to be and becomes the America we want it to be.”

On members of the Transition Integrity Project

Rosa Brooks: “I can give you some names. We're actually in the process of going back to all of our participants and saying, ‘Are you willing to have your name publicly connected to this?’ We had promised everybody, you know, we'll keep your participation confidential if you would like us to. But a lot of people are beginning to say, ‘I'm happy to be publicly connected to it.’

"So they ranged from people like Michael Steele, the former chairman of the Republican National Committee, to John Podesta, who has worked for Hillary Clinton, very senior levels, Obama, et cetera. … People like Larry with deep experience, obviously, not only in the military, but Larry also has deep experience at the State Department. … We had former Governor Jennifer Granholm from Michigan. We had Donna Brazile, who is a Democratic consultant. We had Republican political consultants and even a couple of former Republican members of Congress, some of whose names are not yet out there.

“So it was a very varied group. We had people who had worked for members of Congress at senior levels. We had people who had been members of Congress from both parties. We had journalists. We had people like Bill Kristol on the conservative side, as well as people who had worked for big tech companies. So we really were trying as much as we could to assemble a group of people who, If asked to role play, if asked ‘OK pretend you're on the Trump campaign, pretend that you're a Democratic elected official, pretend that you are Facebook or Twitter.’ We wanted people who would have a real life sense of how those actors and organizations likely would behave based on actual experience in those sectors.”

What are ‘war game’ tabletop exercises?

Rosa Brooks: “They're widely used in the national security world, but they're also increasingly used in the private sector and in other areas of government in the nonprofit sector, because basically it's just a way to think through some what ifs. That's a little bit more structured, a little bit more disciplined than just sitting around together saying, ‘Hey, what if this bad thing happens? What if that happens? What do we do?’

"The idea is that you don't get to say, ‘Oh, that could never happen.’ That you actually have to think about the things that probably won't happen, that you hope won't happen. But think about, ‘Could they happen, how could they happen? If they happen, what would we do?’ Not because you're predicting an outcome, but because you want to be prepared and in fact, you want to prevent the bad outcomes from ever coming about. So they can be structured in all kinds of different ways."

On how the game works

Rosa Brooks: "We used a form of gaming called the Matrix game, which essentially you start with a scenario: Trump loses the popular vote but wins in the Electoral College, or Biden has a narrow win in the Electoral College and a larger win of the popular vote, or whatever it may be. And, you know, we worked with experts on polling and election law to try to come up with scenarios state-by-state that were as realistic as possible.

"And you then take your participants and we assign them into teams. So we had a team playing the role of the Trump campaign. We had a team playing the role of the Biden campaign. And we had teams playing elected officials from each party. We had a media team. We had a public team with some polling experts who could help say, ‘Here's how people might respond in this situation or that situation.’

"And then each team gets to make moves. And the moves take the form of essentially saying, ‘OK. Hello, we're the Trump campaign. We're going to do X in order to accomplish Y. And we believe it's going to be successful because Z.' And that move might be we’re going to request a recount, or we're going to file a lawsuit requesting a halt to vote counting in Michigan, or wherever. And we think that will help us. Because here's what we're trying to accomplish with this and here's why we think it's going to work.

"And then the other players can weigh in and say things ... based on their real life experience and say, 'Yeah, that's probably going to be successful or no, you know, that's a total long shot, or who knows, 50-50.' Based on that we actually, you know, these games are quite artificial. They have all kinds of constraints. That's one of the reasons to emphasize they're not predictions. They're explorations of possibilities. Not, this is what's going to happen.

"But then there's an element of pure randomness. We literally had our guy running the games, an expert on game design would roll a 10 sided [dice]. And depending on the comments from participants, the probability of success of a particular move might be judged to be 20%, or 80% or 50-50. And depending on that initial assessment, the dye would be rolled to determine, 'OK. It worked. You know, the court ruled in your favor. Or, the recount was stopped, or it didn't work.' And then other players sequentially would be able to make moves in response.

"And this would go on through several phases with different teams making moves and the other teams responding to them in an effort as much as we could to, you know, in a period of four or five hours, to simulate what would take place in the real world over weeks. And in fact, a couple of months. In an effort to try to figure out if that happened, what, in fact would these other actors do? What would career civil servants do? What would the military do? What would elected officials do?”

On lessons of the “war game”

Ret. Col. Lawrence Wilkerson: “Let me just say some of the things that we're putting out there. Among those things, one that is very important is the media, particularly the mainstream media. They cannot act as they usually act with regard to elections. They have to play a coup on election night. They can't be declaring some state like Pennsylvania for one candidate or the other. When Pennsylvania probably has thousands upon thousands of votes yet to come in and count. So the media has to get its act in order and it has to act very differently than it normally does.

“Second, as I said before, citizens have to vote. Even with COVID-19, they have to vote. And we also have learned that poll workers have to be younger. And we've started a movement all across the country to train young people. And we've had really good luck with the volunteers to do so, to be poll workers. Because we found out in Wisconsin, for example, poll workers are mostly over 60. And many of them didn't show up because they were afraid of COVID-19. And so Wisconsin went from about one 188 polling places, to about 15. That's disastrous. And we need citizens in general to be aware of some of the things we've talked about here so that they can alert their members of Congress as constituents of those members to take action, or to be aware of the same thing.

"And lastly, let me say this to all my military friends out there, as we used to say in the chairman's office. The military needs to stay in barracks. Simply stated, that means the military has no business taking any side in either part of this election. And I remember in 1989 when Cory Aquino in the Philippines telephoned us, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and said, ‘I have a company that's about to take over my government. Can you help me?’ And we essentially made sure that company stayed in barracks. So we don't need the military interfering in any way, fashion or form with these elections. I know that’s dire. I know that's too serious, maybe. But I've read the history books.”



Boston Globe: "A bipartisan group secretly gathered to game out a contested Trump-Biden election. It wasn’t pretty" — "On the second Friday in June, a group of political operatives, former government and military officials, and academics quietly convened online for what became a disturbing exercise in the fragility of American democracy."

Newsweek: "Bipartisan Group Predicts 'Violence' If Trump Loses Election and Refuses to Leave White House" — "A bipartisan group of about 80 political operatives and academics has been involved in discussions about what could happen if President Donald Trump were to lose the November election and then contest the results, potentially refusing to leave the White House."

Financial Times: "How America could fail its democracy test" — "Donald Trump has won the electoral college by a clear margin. Yet America is in ferment. Cities around the world are holding candlelit vigils for US democracy and smaller Democratic states have joined California to threaten 'Calexit.' Unions plan a general strike to pressure chief executives to back America’s majority."

Washington Post: "Trump’s assault on election integrity forces question: What would happen if he refused to accept a loss?" — "President Trump’s relentless efforts to sow doubts about the legitimacy of this year’s election are forcing both parties to reckon with the possibility that he may dispute the result in November if he loses — leading to an unprecedented test of American democracy."

Related:

Mass. Voters Doubt Election Results Will Be Trusted, Split On Trump's Respect For Rule of Law

Trump Will Try To Subvert The Election. We Must Be Prepared



 




 

Massachusetts Law Enforcement Readies For Contentious Election

That coordination includes a centrally located command center that will gather intelligence from around the state about potential disruptions to the election or possible violence following the election results.



© Copyright WBUR 2018
Meno_
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 7257
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby obsrvr524 » Sun Oct 18, 2020 9:03 pm

As always the Marxist strive to shift the focus of suspicion onto their opponent for their own activity.

The Marxists intend to reject and battle against the election so they accuse their opponent of of it.

No surprise here.
              You have been observed.
obsrvr524
Thinker
 
Posts: 574
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 9:03 am

Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Sun Oct 18, 2020 11:09 pm

obsrvr524 wrote:As always the Marxist strive to shift the focus of suspicion onto their opponent for their own activity.

The Marxists intend to reject and battle against the election so they accuse their opponent of of it.

No surprise here.




And none here either. Its a game, a waiting game in addition to other things, depending on the side of the isle.

Got a friend, worried, if covid spike occurs, his business may fail more likely, and he goes by the theory, that Trump's prediction of overall business failures leading to another great depression, then simulating world wide ideological conflict balances out the opposite.

That if such a scenario would unfold, the potential loss of life from ensuing hunger, psychological and physical distress, would be far greater then the economy being left open, albeit in a limited manner.

But he also believes that Vivid was intended to be a biological weapon, and what happens next, would be a strike on China with all we've got . Bad? Not according to the same person, since US military is so overwhelming and specifically perfect in limited ways, that China knowing this intelligence would be very timid to engage.

Now this for starters , if Trump wins. But the 'socialists' within their ranks, proclaiming 'none dare call it a cinspiracy' would concentrate on saving lives at the exclusion of anything else.


Is You get 2 versions of the same story, depending on which side of the isle put you by the cards dealt.

What unabashedly say You, in spite of having an earlier abridged version. before.
Meno_
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 7257
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby obsrvr524 » Mon Oct 19, 2020 1:17 am

I couldn't quite follow all of that but...
Meno_ wrote:But the 'socialists' within their ranks, proclaiming 'none dare call it a cinspiracy' would concentrate on saving lives at the exclusion of anything else.

The last thing the socialists are concerned with is "lives". Socialism is about centralizing power and at any expense. They quite readily eat their own.
              You have been observed.
obsrvr524
Thinker
 
Posts: 574
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 9:03 am

Re: Trump enters the stage - The depth of the state soul

Postby Meno_ » Mon Oct 19, 2020 1:39 am

obsrvr524 wrote:I couldn't quite follow all of that but...
Meno_ wrote:But the 'socialists' within their ranks, proclaiming 'none dare call it a cinspiracy' would concentrate on saving lives at the exclusion of anything else.

The last thing the socialists are concerned with is "lives". Socialism is about centralizing power and at any expense. They quite readily eat their own.





Well power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely. That cliché has become self serving by now.


But here is another take on mud slinging, and nothing surprises there either, here, except the depth of the swamp from which voters can fish out something tangible.and rational.


"Stay Updated on Developing Stories


How low will Donald Trump go?


(CNN)With just 16 days(!) until the 2020 election, it will be here before you know it. Every Sunday, I outline the 5 BIG storylines you need to know to understand the upcoming week on the campaign trail. And they're ranked -- so the No. 1 story is the most important of the coming week.

5. Deal or no deal?: 

By Tuesday, according to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, we should know whether Congress and the White House will find a way to make a deal before the election on a coronavirus stimulus package.

"While there was some encouraging news, much work remains," Pelosi said in a letter sent to her colleagues on Sunday afternoon. "I am optimistic that we can reach agreement before the election. To that end, we are writing language as we negotiate the priorities, so that we are fully prepared to move forward once we reach agreement."

The nut of the issue appears to be the size of the bill -- particularly as it relates to funding for testing (and other Covid-19-related issues) for minority communities. 

The White House offered a $1.8 trillion bill last week which Pelosi quickly rejected. (Some Democratic Party leaders -- including 2020 presidential candidate Andrew Yang -- have suggested Pelosi needs to cut a deal for the good of the country.)

And while she seems open to the idea of a deal generally, other parts of Pelosi's letter are, um, less encouraging.

"The White House had assured Democrats that they would accept our language on testing with a 'light touch,'" she wrote. "Unfortunately, as the committees of jurisdiction review the White House's language provision-by-provision, it has become clear that these changes are not a light touch but instead, a deep dive."

The clock is ticking. 48 hours and counting.

4.  A down-ballot disaster:

Yes, President Donald Trump looks like he is going to lose the presidential race to former Vice President Joe Biden. But it now increasingly looks like his unpopularity with the electorate could also cost his party the Senate and drive them even further into the House minority.

Inside Elections, a non-partisan handicapping tip sheet run by Nathan Gonzales, a CNN contributor, revised its seat projections in the Senate and the House in Democrats' favor.

Gonzales is now predicting a four- to six-seat Democratic gain in the Senate, which, if it comes to pass, means that Democrats will win the Senate majority whether Biden wins the White House or not.

On the House side, Gonzales now says Democrats are likely to gain between 10 and 20 seats, which could well double their current majority. (Republicans need a net gain of 17 seats to win the House majority, which is, well, not happening.)

If Inside Elections is right, Democrats would have full control over Washington that they haven't enjoyed since the first two years of Barack Obama's first term.

What that would mean is, effectively, an undoing of the last four years of Trump's presidency -- whether on health care, the environment, the tax code or the overall regulatory process in the nation's capital.

Side note: Keep an eye WAY down-ballot on the battle for state legislative control. This will be the last election before the country redraws its state legislative and House district lines in the wake of the 2020 Census. Which party controls the majority controls the line-drawing software in many of these states.

3. 22 million (and counting):

More than 22 million people -- across 45 states and the District of Columbia -- have already voted, whether by mail or in person.

That's roughly half of the total number of early votes -- 46 million -- cast in the 2016 election. And we are still more than two weeks from the actual Election Day!

Some of the swing state vote total comparisons tell the story of the booming early vote in 2020.

In Florida, almost 2.3 million votes have been cast in this election, roughly double the number of ballots cast at this point in 2016. In Michigan, the vote total is near 1.3 million, nearly three times as large as 2016.

And it's just not large turnout that's the story. Democrats are dominating the early vote in the 27 states who reported ballots cast by party affiliation. To date, 5.4 million registered Democrats have voted early while 2.5 million registered Republicans have done so. 

(NOTE: This voting information comes from by Catalist, a data company that provides data, analytics and other services to Democrats, academics and non-profit issue advocacy organizations.)

To be clear: Party registration -- and early vote numbers -- aren't determinative of outcomes. (My friend Harry Enten explains why here). But what we know is that early vote turnout is very likely to shatter every past record -- and that Biden is very likely to have a considerable lead when Election Day dawns.

2. The last debate:

It's been three weeks since Trump and Biden first shared a debate stage. And that first debate was an unmitigated disaster for the President as his bullying, interrupting and white-hot rhetoric triggered a decidedly negative reaction in the electorate.

Trump's refusal to participate in a virtual second debate now means that Thursday night's head-to-head in Nashville, Tennessee, is Trump's last chance to alter in some way the operating dynamic of the race.

It's not totally clear how Trump will do that, although my best guess is that he will spend a lot of time talking about Joe Biden's son, Hunter, and his time spent on a board of a Ukrainian natural gas company.

Those attacks, however, have to date been of limited appeal outside of Trump's most loyal followers. Those voters aren't Trump's problem. It's the loosely affiliated Republican and independents that the President needs a message for. 

If the past few days is any indication, Trump doesn't have that message. What he has been pitching in his whirlwind series of campaign stops since his recovery from Covid-19 is just more of the same base-stroking.

One other thing to keep in mind: Biden has said he would not participate in this final debate unless Trump tests negative for coronavirus.

"He just had Covid," Lara Trump, the wife of Eric Trump, told CNN's Jake Tapper of the President on Sunday. "He has now been cleared of Covid, which means he took a negative test, I'm sure he'll take another one before the debate."

1. How low can Trump go?:

The most dangerous animal is a wounded and trapped one. That goes for humans, too -- specifically the President of the United States.

Trump finds himself, with just over two weeks before the election, down in national and swing-state polling, being heavily out-raised and outspent by the Biden campaign and seeing signs everywhere of Republicans starting to jockey for what the party will look like when/if he loses.

Trump's tweets -- and campaign rally speeches -- over the past few days suggest that he a) knows he is losing b) has no idea how to turn it around (see item No. 2) and c) is going to try to burn down, well, everything on his perceived way out the door.

That reality makes Trump even more dangerous to Biden -- and the country -- than he has shown himself to be over the past almost four years. Trump will say and do absolutely anything between now and November 3 -- motivated roughly equally by a desire to win and a passion to make things as bad and ugly and awful as possible for Biden in the event he wins.

Trump has already taken to trumpeting potentially hacked materials tied to the Bidens. He has repeatedly questioned Biden's mental health and acuity. He has encouraged the QAnon movement. He has suggested that the Navy Seal Team 6 killed an Osama bin Laden body double.

And that's just in the last few weeks! How much lower can Trump go than that, you ask? I am not even sure what "lower" looks like but I am absolutely certain there is no bottom for this President. Never has been.



© 2020 Cable News Network. A Warner Media Company. All Rights Reserved.
Meno_
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 7257
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby obsrvr524 » Mon Oct 19, 2020 4:30 am

Did you listen to the Veritas recording of Jeff Zucker of CNN telling his reporters to focus ONLY on Mr Trump? Bloomberg did the same.
              You have been observed.
obsrvr524
Thinker
 
Posts: 574
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 9:03 am

Re: Trump enters the stage - rats abandoning the sinking shi

Postby Meno_ » Mon Oct 19, 2020 7:18 pm

"I’m worried that if President Trump loses — as looks likely — that he’s going to take the Senate down with him,” Nebraska Sen. Ben Sasse said of the GOP's campaign odds in a conference call with constituents.Anna Moneymaker

Oct. 19, 2020, 9:45 AM EDT


WASHINGTON — Republican senators are increasingly voicing fears that President Donald Trump could lose the election, and some are openly fretting that he’ll turn the party's candidates into electoral roadkill, distancing themselves from him to an unusual extent.

A weekend of agonizing from Republicans did not yield any perceivable course correction from Trump as he continued his inflammatory rhetoric on the campaign trail and directed some of his fire right back at anxious GOP senators on Twitter.

Pointed warnings of electoral defeat have come in recent days from Sens. Ben Sasse of Nebraska, Ted Cruz of Texas and Lindsey Graham of South Carolina. All are former Trump critics turned allies who reliably vote with the president.

“I’m worried that if President Trump loses — as looks likely — that he’s going to take the Senate down with him,” Sasse said in a conference call with constituents last week, according to a recording first reported on Thursday by the Washington Examiner. “I’m now looking at the possibility of a Republican bloodbath in the Senate.”



The elevated fears come as Democrat Joe Biden leads Trump by more than 9 points in the NBC News national polling average, and as some forecasters say Democrats are likely to secure control of Congress. The grim GOP outlook follows Trump’s widely criticized debate showing, hospitalization for Covid and a failure to secure an economic stimulus package.

“I hope that they're having a moment of moral clarity. I think they're realizing that the Trump show is almost over,” said Olivia Troye, a former homeland security adviser to Vice President Mike Pence who served on the White House coronavirus task force. “They have ridden the Trump wave long enough. But I think it's no longer helpful to do that for them.”

Troye, a longtime Republican, says she plans to vote for Biden and Democrats down the ballot this fall. “There needs to be a significant change,” she said, and insisted that Sasse represents the misgivings of many party elites who are afraid to speak up.

At the Supreme Court hearing last Thursday for Judge Amy Coney Barrett, Graham, chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee and a Trump golfing partner who is in a close re-election battle himself, told Democrats, “Y’all have a good chance of winning the White House.”

Cruz, a Trump rival in 2016 and now a staunch ally, said recently on CNBC that if Americans are angry and depressed, “we could lose the White House and both houses of Congress," and the 2020 election “could be a bloodbath of Watergate proportions.”

The remarks also represent a jockeying for position in an anticipated post-Trump world, when the party will have to chart a new path. As others in the GOP cozy up to far-right conspiracy movements like QAnon, Sasse suggested in his remarks that he wants to excise some of the party's Trumpian elements.

Sasse unloaded on Trump, saying that he “kisses dictators' butts,” mistreats women, “mocks evangelicals behind closed doors” and has “flirted with white supremacists.” He said that Trump’s family “has treated the presidency like a business opportunity,” and that Trump refused to take the coronavirus seriously for “months” and instead “treated it like a news cycle PR crisis rather than a multi-year public health challenge.”

Liam Donovan, a lobbyist and former Republican operative, said the remarks “strike me less as panic and more as resignation setting in.”

“Even then only Sasse has been critical of the president. Cruz is essentially pre-spinning the loss and laying the blame with Democrats,” he said. “Both suggest the writing is on the wall, but otherwise very different tacks.”

Trump lashed back Saturday in a series of tweets, saying that Sasse has returned to his “stupid and obnoxious ways” after being “nice” to him in recent years and earning his endorsement, which helped Sasse win renomination to his Senate seat in May.

“Little Ben is a liability to the Republican Party, and an embarrassment to the Great State of Nebraska,” Trump wrote. “Other than that, he’s just a wonderful guy!”



Sen. Thom Tillis, R-N.C., who trails his Democratic opponent Cal Cunningham in a competitive race, is openly contemplating Trump’s defeat and orienting his messaging around it.

“The best check on a Biden presidency is for Republicans to have a majority in the Senate. And I do think 'checks and balances' does resonate with North Carolina voters,” he told Politico.

Garland Tucker, a retired Raleigh financier who briefly challenged Tillis in the Republican primary before ending his bid early and endorsing him, told NBC News that there is “apprehension” in the party that Trump could lose.

“Any conservative and any Republican fears that could be the case,” he said. But several days ago, he predicted “a very close election” that could tighten if Trump “has a successful next three weeks.”

Tucker said he remained optimistic that Trump would win but added that Republican candidates are in trouble if he doesn’t. “The weaker President Trump is at the top of the ticket, the more likely it is that we lose the Senate majority,” he said. “The two are pretty inextricably combined.”

The fears were compounded on Friday when Trump tore into Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, a 24-year GOP incumbent fighting for her political life, for opposing Barrett's Supreme Court nomination this close to an election. “Well, she didn’t support Healthcare or my opening up 5000 square miles of Ocean to Maine, so why should this be any different,” he tweeted. “Not worth the work!”

To some GOP operatives, the tweet was a slapdash rant that further jeopardized a potentially pivotal Senate seat, as Collins has no path if Trump supporters don’t vote for her. But to Trump allies, his reaction was understandable given that Collins was not willing to support Barrett.

“It’s disappointing that Collins wouldn’t back Barrett, or feels she can’t,” Tucker said. “And I’m sure he’s frustrated.”
Meno_
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 7257
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Mon Oct 19, 2020 7:19 pm

obsrvr524 wrote:Did you listen to the Veritas recording of Jeff Zucker of CNN telling his reporters to focus ONLY on Mr Trump? Bloomberg did the same.




Just got back. I did not. Encapsulate the point being made obsrvr, .if You would.
Meno_
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 7257
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

PreviousNext

Return to Current Events



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users