Trump enters the stage

Discussion of the recent unfolding of history.

Re: Trump enters the stage. Strange brew

Postby obsrvr524 » Wed Oct 27, 2021 12:12 am

Meno_ wrote:---
USA TODAY


WASHINGTON – --- House Select Star Committee investigating the Jan. 6 Socialist Coup insurrection at the U.S. Capitol by a FBI contrived faux-pro-Trump mob. The Select Star Committee voted unanimously Tuesday to hold Bannon in congressional contempt.


The full House voted 229-202. All Democrats voted in favor; most Republicans voted against.

House GOP leadership had urged members Wednesday to vote no, but nine Republicans voted to hold Bannon in contempt. That included Reps. Liz Cheney of Wyoming and Adam Kinzinger of Illinois (both faux Republicans appointed by the Democrat party), both of whom serve on the Jan. 6 Star committee that was appointed by the US Communist party - "Democrats".


-- As the socialist/communist/"Democrat" propaganda machine trudges on in the effort to ensure the utter decimation of the USA - despite mounting public evidence of FBI (the US's KGB) involvement in every major violent disruption.
              You have been observed.
    Though often tempted to encourage a dog to distinguish color I refuse to argue with him about it
    It's just the same Satanism as always -
    • separate the bottom from the top,
    • the left from the right,
    • the light from the dark, and
    • blame each for the sins of the other
    • - until they beg you to take charge.
    • -- but "you" have been observed --

The prospect of death weighs naught upon the purpose of life - James S Saint - 2009
obsrvr524
Philosopher
 
Posts: 4238
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 9:03 am

Re: Trump enters the stage - some stirrings from the deep st

Postby Meno_ » Sat Oct 30, 2021 5:27 pm

"Fox News





IMMIGRATION

 

Published 2 hours ago

Reported Biden plan to pay illegal immigrants $450K could surpass payments to some 9/11, military families

Payments of $450K per person are reportedly being considered by the Biden admin





 



 



 



 



 


'The Five' blasts Biden's plan to pay migrants who crossed border illegally

Panel discusses the White House proposal to pay illegal immigrants millions

A reported plan by the Biden administration to pay $450,000 per person to illegal immigrants who had been separated during the Trump administration could exceed the payments given to some families of 9/11 victims and Gold Star families.

The Wall Street Journal reported Thursday that the departments of Justice, Homeland Security, and Health and Human Services are considering payments of $450,000 to those who crossed the border illegally and were separated from family members. It is in response to a lawsuit by civil rights groups. The payments could therefore amount to close to $1 million per family and $1 billion overall



Say what?
Meno_
The Invisible One
 
Posts: 13276
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage -omit goodness!

Postby Meno_ » Wed Dec 01, 2021 9:02 am

The republicans are feverishly trying to install key poll workers who can control election results, and now this:


"HOMEPAGE
HOME  ECONOMY
Trump urges McConnell to endanger the US economy so Democrats can't pass their spending plan
Ben Winck and Joseph Zeballos-Roig 10 hours ago
President Donald Trump takes questions from reporters he arrives with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., for the Senate Republicans' lunch in the Capitol on Tuesday, March 26, 2019.
Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky. (left), and former President Donald Trump (right). Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images
Former Pres. Donald Trump urged Sen. McConnell on Tuesday to "use the debt ceiling" to block Biden's agenda.
Congress has until December 15 to raise the limit and keep the US from defaulting on its debt.
Using the ceiling as a political weapon risks unprecedented economic catastrophe."

That these things politically retain the poisonous years behind us, show the diminishing nature of the values of Democracy, and the descent into the labyrinth of social contempt, and the furthering of ignorance by those who think little of reason, wisdom, or respect for human life, so that their stranglehold on control can remain to feed their insatiable appetite for greed through malfeasance.
Meno_
The Invisible One
 
Posts: 13276
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage -omit goodness!

Postby obsrvr524 » Wed Dec 01, 2021 1:32 pm

Meno_ wrote:The republicans are feverishly trying to install key poll workers who can control election results

-- which tells us immediately that the opposite is true - the Socialists/Democrats (who don't believe in voting anyway) are trying to install poll workers who can control election results - just as they did in 202 - but now face scrutiny by the US Constitutionalist.

    Socialist Motto -"Always accuse your opponent of exactly what you are doing"

Meno_ wrote:Former Pres. Donald Trump urged Sen. McConnell on Tuesday to "use the debt ceiling" to block Biden's agenda.
Congress has until December 15 to raise the limit and keep the US from defaulting on its debt.
Using the ceiling as a political weapon risks unprecedented economic catastrophe."

:lol:
    "My credit card is over charged and I can't pay my bills - so - get the debt limit raised so I can get further in debt with even more bills I can't pay"

What kind of silly leader would oppose that? :-?

Did you get this shite from MSNBC - or - CNN?
              You have been observed.
    Though often tempted to encourage a dog to distinguish color I refuse to argue with him about it
    It's just the same Satanism as always -
    • separate the bottom from the top,
    • the left from the right,
    • the light from the dark, and
    • blame each for the sins of the other
    • - until they beg you to take charge.
    • -- but "you" have been observed --

The prospect of death weighs naught upon the purpose of life - James S Saint - 2009
obsrvr524
Philosopher
 
Posts: 4238
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 9:03 am

Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Wed Dec 01, 2021 5:46 pm

It's not which side instigated this 'plot' to play political football, but that it is an indication that projected scenes of elevated hype rule spending as a requisition to pay bills covers the overspending, due to inflationary pressures.

This primary fact, is covered by spending on both sides, and it really is secondary to power games played in anticipation to next year.

It only appears as if the kids awareness counts on the decisive level which finally determines the outcome, and assuming both sides consult momma about complaining on each other's short sightedness, but appearances fail to appreciate these types of preliminary projections as nothing more then building criteria of 'real' objective assessment when the showdown next year needs these kids to shout about the emperor wearing no clothes.

Any armature can see this as an indication of playing with underlings' minds in predictable manner of deny and project.

No need for a sloth here, as momma may have trouble deciding between the faults of her two brats.
Meno_
The Invisible One
 
Posts: 13276
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage - rebooting or replaying scenes

Postby Meno_ » Thu Dec 02, 2021 1:43 am

"Conservative Republicans are threatening a government shutdown in 2 days to nix funding for Biden's vaccine mandate — which isn't even in effect yet
Joseph Zeballos-Roig 5 hours ago
mtg vaccine holocaust comparison
Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Ga. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images
The GOP is threatening to shut down the government to block funding for federal agencies implementing Biden's vaccine and testing mandates.
But the mandate hasn't taken effect yet and has even been stayed by federal courts.
Conservatives appear to be angling for a "symbolic win," a conservative expert said.



Congress is inching closer to a government shutdown in two days as conservative lawmakers threaten to oppose a short-term funding bill over President Joe Biden's vaccine and testing mandate for large employers.

There's just one problem with their combative approach: the directive hasn't taken effect yet and it will likely be tied up in courts for a while.

A group of 11 Senate Republicans that include Ron Johnson of Wisconsin, Ted Cruz of Texas, and Mike Lee of Utah are threatening to hold up swift passage of a short-term government funding bill (known as a continuing resolution), something that requires the consent of all 100 senators in the upper chamber. It's thrown a huge wrench in bipartisan talks to extend federal funding into either January or February 2022.

It mirrors earlier demands from conservative hardliners like Reps. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia and Chip Roy of Texas to shut down the government if new spending legislation doesn't strip out funding for the mandate. Failure to pass a stopgap measure means the government would partially closes its doors after 11:59 pm on Friday, leading to the third shutdown since 2017.

The vaccine and testing mandates are reviled among many Republican lawmakers, who view it as a case of gross federal overreach. They've tried repeatedly to eliminate it in Congress but lack the necessary votes.

Biden issued it in September as cases from the Delta variant surged, mandating private employers with 100 workers or more to require shots or set up regular testing in workplaces. It was supposed to take effect in January, but GOP officials in 23 states sued to prevent the Occupational Safety and Health Administration from carrying it out. A federal court blocked the measure in early November.

Judi Conti, the government affairs director at the National Employment Law Project, said it would probably take several more weeks for the case to travel through federal courts.

"Anybody who was planning to try to shut the government down over a mandate that isn't even going to take effect yet — because it's tied up in the courts — is getting ready to inflict an awful lot of cruelty on federal employees and contractors across the country for absolutely no reason," Conti said in an interview.

She added that a government shutdown would threaten to jeopardize the flow of paychecks to federal workers. They'd eventually get back pay, but some could struggle to cover day-to-day expenses like groceries and rent during a shutdown. For often low-paid contractors like janitors, it's a different story: Conti says they'd lose out on their wages entirely.

Conservatives appear to be angling for a "symbolic win," according to Philip Wallach, a regulatory expert and senior fellow at the right-leaning American Enterprise Institute.

"It makes sense in as much it's something that their base constituents care a lot about and something they think is weak given the court rulings so far," Wallach told Insider. "The CR is their point of maximum leverage right now."

Some Republicans are scratching their heads at the conservative hardliners. "I just don't quite understand the strategy or the play of leverage for a mandate that's been stayed by 10 courts," Sen. Kevin Cramer of North Dakota told reporters.

With few signs of the feud being resolved on Wednesday, Republican leaders tried projecting confidence that the government ultimately wouldn't shut down. "I think we're going to be okay," Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell told reporters on Friday.








* Copyright © 2021 Insider Inc. All rights reserved.
Meno_
The Invisible One
 
Posts: 13276
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage - rebooting or replaying scenes

Postby obsrvr524 » Thu Dec 02, 2021 3:25 am

Meno_ wrote:"Conservative Republicans are threatening a government shutdown in 2 days to nix funding for Biden's vaccine mandate — which isn't even in effect yet
Joseph Zeballos-Roig 5 hours ago
mtg vaccine holocaust comparison
Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Ga. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images
The GOP is threatening to shut down the government to block funding for federal agencies implementing Biden's vaccine and testing mandates.
But the mandate hasn't taken effect yet and has even been stayed by federal courts.
Conservatives appear to be angling for a "symbolic win," a conservative expert said.



Congress is inching closer to a government shutdown in two days as conservative lawmakers threaten to oppose a short-term funding bill over President Joe Biden's vaccine and testing mandate for large employers.

There's just one problem with their combative approach: the directive hasn't taken effect yet and it will likely be tied up in courts for a while.

A group of 11 Senate Republicans that include Ron Johnson of Wisconsin, Ted Cruz of Texas, and Mike Lee of Utah are threatening to hold up swift passage of a short-term government funding bill (known as a continuing resolution), something that requires the consent of all 100 senators in the upper chamber. It's thrown a huge wrench in bipartisan talks to extend federal funding into either January or February 2022.

It mirrors earlier demands from conservative hardliners like Reps. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia and Chip Roy of Texas to shut down the government if new spending legislation doesn't strip out funding for the mandate. Failure to pass a stopgap measure means the government would partially closes its doors after 11:59 pm on Friday, leading to the third shutdown since 2017.

The vaccine and testing mandates are reviled among many Republican lawmakers, who view it as a case of gross federal overreach. They've tried repeatedly to eliminate it in Congress but lack the necessary votes.

Biden issued it in September as cases from the Delta variant surged, mandating private employers with 100 workers or more to require shots or set up regular testing in workplaces. It was supposed to take effect in January, but GOP officials in 23 states sued to prevent the Occupational Safety and Health Administration from carrying it out. A federal court blocked the measure in early November.

Judi Conti, the government affairs director at the National Employment Law Project, said it would probably take several more weeks for the case to travel through federal courts.

"Anybody who was planning to try to shut the government down over a mandate that isn't even going to take effect yet — because it's tied up in the courts — is getting ready to inflict an awful lot of cruelty on federal employees and contractors across the country for absolutely no reason," Conti said in an interview.

She added that a government shutdown would threaten to jeopardize the flow of paychecks to federal workers. They'd eventually get back pay, but some could struggle to cover day-to-day expenses like groceries and rent during a shutdown. For often low-paid contractors like janitors, it's a different story: Conti says they'd lose out on their wages entirely.

Conservatives appear to be angling for a "symbolic win," according to Philip Wallach, a regulatory expert and senior fellow at the right-leaning American Enterprise Institute.

"It makes sense in as much it's something that their base constituents care a lot about and something they think is weak given the court rulings so far," Wallach told Insider. "The CR is their point of maximum leverage right now."

Some Republicans are scratching their heads at the conservative hardliners. "I just don't quite understand the strategy or the play of leverage for a mandate that's been stayed by 10 courts," Sen. Kevin Cramer of North Dakota told reporters.

With few signs of the feud being resolved on Wednesday, Republican leaders tried projecting confidence that the government ultimately wouldn't shut down. "I think we're going to be okay," Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell told reporters on Friday.








* Copyright © 2021 Insider Inc. All rights reserved.

Do you really only read socialist/communist propaganda news outlets about the US?

They always hype the fear of the government shutting down and it never actually shuts down - and wouldn't really matter if it did.
              You have been observed.
    Though often tempted to encourage a dog to distinguish color I refuse to argue with him about it
    It's just the same Satanism as always -
    • separate the bottom from the top,
    • the left from the right,
    • the light from the dark, and
    • blame each for the sins of the other
    • - until they beg you to take charge.
    • -- but "you" have been observed --

The prospect of death weighs naught upon the purpose of life - James S Saint - 2009
obsrvr524
Philosopher
 
Posts: 4238
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 9:03 am

Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Thu Dec 02, 2021 5:42 pm

But it's really not about you and me. This political football is about the grass roots reality, to preview the coming attractions of political illusions, aka 'political correctness' sold to any bidder willing to bargain away the guaranteed rights to facts.
Who will buy, who will be able to sell determines the value of that commodity.

Everything for sale, dressed upin proper ward, course never really know what's in it, especially f of you and me, or any other believer in conspiracy theories.

It is the well oiled machine that matters, everything else is mere hype.

I do too listen to Laura Ingram. She is entertaining as well, but doesen't come close to the comedy routines par excellance that the star of the Apprentice' can muster up.
Meno_
The Invisible One
 
Posts: 13276
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby obsrvr524 » Thu Dec 02, 2021 10:27 pm

-
Ingraham has a lot of good things to say but really - after 20 years you would think that she would have learned when to shut her bloody mouth and let her guests finish a sentence without her talking over them - Hannity is the same way - can't seem to understand when to shut his face. They could both take lessons from Tucker on civility and manners so that the audience can hear what is being said.
              You have been observed.
    Though often tempted to encourage a dog to distinguish color I refuse to argue with him about it
    It's just the same Satanism as always -
    • separate the bottom from the top,
    • the left from the right,
    • the light from the dark, and
    • blame each for the sins of the other
    • - until they beg you to take charge.
    • -- but "you" have been observed --

The prospect of death weighs naught upon the purpose of life - James S Saint - 2009
obsrvr524
Philosopher
 
Posts: 4238
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 9:03 am

Re: Trump enters the stage - rebound ?

Postby Meno_ » Sun Dec 05, 2021 5:43 pm

"Newsweek

Donald Trump's Post-Election Fury Prompted a Warning from His General

POLITICS

Donald Trump Peddled His 'Stolen Election' Story. The Job was to Promote GOP Candidate

In this daily series, Newsweek explores the steps that led to the January 6 Capitol Riot.
On Saturday, December 5, Donald Trump flew to Valdosta, Georgia, to speak at a rally to support two Republican party candidates for the Senate, Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue. It was his first rally since the election, a month earlier.

The point of Trump's trip to Georgia was to encourage voting in the January 5 runoff, a race that would decide the balance of power in Washington. Republicans needed only one victory in Georgia to maintain their majority. Democrats need a Georgia sweep to create a Senate divided down the center, making Vice President-elect Kamala Harris president of the Senate and the tiebreaking vote.



Thousands of Georgians came out, largely unmasked, to the rally site at Valdosta airport—not for the candidates, but for their president, the fighter, their fighter. Chants of "fight for Trump" drowned out the senate candidates when they briefly spoke.

BEST OF NEWSWEEK VIA EMAIL


The rally was a success for Trump, strengthening his connection to his personal base. For the Republican party, it was a disaster.


Donald Trump's rally for Georgia's GOP Senate candidates was good for Trump but not for the Republican party. The president at Valdosta Regional Airport in Valdosta, Georgia on December 5, 2020. -
ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP VIA GETTY IMAGES

After perfunctory introductions of Loeffler and Perdue, Trump pivoted back his favorite subject, his fictitious narrative of a stolen election. "You know we won Georgia, just so you understand," the president said, "and we won Florida and we won a lot of places. ... remember we were going to lose Florida ... I think they say that if you win Florida and if you win Ohio, in history you've never lost an election this has got to be a first time, but the truth is they were right we've never lost an election. We're winning this election."

In his two-hour speech, Trump called the state of Georgia corrupt and said that votes were coming out of the ceiling and out of leather bags. He urged everyone to vote, cautioning that they needed to make sure that no one threw out any ballots, that the Georgia secretary of state didn't know "what the hell he's doing." And at every point, the crowd interrupted with shouts of "stop the steal."


>NEWSWEEK SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS >
"Very simply you will decide whether your children will grow up in a socialist country or whether they will grow up in a free country and I will tell you, this socialist is just the beginning for these people, these people want to go further than socialism they want to go into a communistic form of government and I have no doubt about it," Trump said.

Calling the Democratic Party candidates two of the most "extreme far left candidates in the history of our country," Trump urged people to vote, while also saying that "they could cheat in Georgia" and "they're going to try and rig this election too."



"You Must Really Hate Trump," a Furious Donald Trump Said to Bill Barr

'Enemies Foreign and Domestic'? What the Daily Intelligence Briefs Left Out

Trump Must Have a Diabolical Plan, Officials Assumed. But There Was No Plan

He went on and on, about all the good he'd done, about everyone else being a fraud or a danger, about saving America, about protecting their right to free speech, about saving their guns, about stopping the "radical indoctrination" of their children.

"We can't let them do it again ... steal Georgia. Your governor could stop it very easily if he knew what the hell he was doing," he said.

Hours before his appearance in Valdosta, the president called Georgia Governor Brian Kemp, a fellow Republican, asking him to convene the state legislature, appoint pro-Trump electors and overturn the results.


Governor Kemp refused, according to the AP's account. Kemp tweeted that Trump asked him to order an audit of signatures on absentee ballots—a move, he said, that he was not empowered to take because he has no authority to interfere in the electoral process.

Trump responded on Twitter: "Your people are refusing to do what you ask. What are they hiding? ..."

"As I told the President this morning," Kemp tweeted, "I've publicly called for a signature audit three times (11/20, 11/24, 12/3) to restore confidence in our election process and to ensure that only legal votes are counted in Georgia." An audit had been initiated by Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger and the race had already been certified; Biden had won.

Republican Senate candidate David Perdue with Donald Trump during a rally to support Republican Senate candidates at Valdosta Regional Airport in Valdosta, Georgia, on December 5, 2020.
ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP VIA GETTY IMAGES
At this point, many mainstream Republicans in Washington were concerned that Trump's harping on fraudulent elections would actually discourage people from going to the polls. The margin for Biden in Georgia was only 12,500 votes of five million cast, so even a small shift could have an outsize effect. Vice President Mike Pence was worried enough to address the issue. Campaigning with Perdue in Savannah, he said: "I know we've all got our doubts about the last election, and I hear some of you saying, 'Just don't vote' ... If you don't vote, they win."

The Republicans would go on to lose both races in historically deeply red Georgia.

© 2021 NEWSWEEK DIGITAL LLC
Meno_
The Invisible One
 
Posts: 13276
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby obsrvr524 » Sun Dec 05, 2021 11:07 pm

-
Still reading trash magazines.

Try reading The Epoch Times or The Washington Times - you'll get a whole different perspective. :shock:
              You have been observed.
    Though often tempted to encourage a dog to distinguish color I refuse to argue with him about it
    It's just the same Satanism as always -
    • separate the bottom from the top,
    • the left from the right,
    • the light from the dark, and
    • blame each for the sins of the other
    • - until they beg you to take charge.
    • -- but "you" have been observed --

The prospect of death weighs naught upon the purpose of life - James S Saint - 2009
obsrvr524
Philosopher
 
Posts: 4238
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 9:03 am

Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby WendyDarling » Mon Dec 06, 2021 12:38 am

obsrvr524 wrote:-
Ingraham has a lot of good things to say but really - after 20 years you would think that she would have learned when to shut her bloody mouth and let her guests finish a sentence without her talking over them - Hannity is the same way - can't seem to understand when to shut his face. They could both take lessons from Tucker on civility and manners so that the audience can hear what is being said.


None of the Fox news broadcasters are gems in my opinion. While Tucker may conduct a better interview, his monologues are
melodramatically condescending. Wish they’d hire some new blood.
WendyDarling
Heroine
 
Posts: 9688
Joined: Sat Sep 11, 2010 8:52 am

Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby obsrvr524 » Mon Dec 06, 2021 10:09 am

WendyDarling wrote:None of the Fox news broadcasters are gems in my opinion. While Tucker may conduct a better interview, his monologues are
melodramatically condescending. Wish they’d hire some new blood.

I refer to Tuckers character as "hyperbolic" - but your description seems accurate as well. For perspective - compare any of them to Rachel Maddow or Joy Behar - at least Fox distinguishes their opinion hosts from their news anchors.

One of the best on Fox is Maria Bartiromo (Fox Business). :D

Oh - almost forgot - Mark Levin (although screams a lot) and Steve Hilton (insists on revolution). All 3 of those do deep research to insure accuracy.
              You have been observed.
    Though often tempted to encourage a dog to distinguish color I refuse to argue with him about it
    It's just the same Satanism as always -
    • separate the bottom from the top,
    • the left from the right,
    • the light from the dark, and
    • blame each for the sins of the other
    • - until they beg you to take charge.
    • -- but "you" have been observed --

The prospect of death weighs naught upon the purpose of life - James S Saint - 2009
obsrvr524
Philosopher
 
Posts: 4238
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 9:03 am

Re: Trump enters the stage - & ze beet goes on?"

Postby Meno_ » Sun Dec 12, 2021 8:58 pm

But before my usual quote, would like to describe the state of the union, briefly and with largely brushed off scenarios......

This is how all of it goes down within my context of the evergreen roots , where I am trying to stand...or make one:

The US Imperum taking over French Indochenese, and English post empire monopolies, on a long gone colonial empire, began to crumble way before 'Gone with the Wind" came out, and the stresses were evident but unnoticed beginning with the near global war of 1848.

So what? Well since then, the connective peace offerings and their violated terms ceased to impress the ideologues, who saw nothing but lasting peace at every turn of the wheel of fortune.

Some saw through this as a direct deaf and Tolstoyian play , as if the iron and the straw man weed merely trying on different terms clothed over an appearent empire's nakedness.

Hell, midst knew it better but weed hushed up.

So what goes it?

Well the while materially empires facade gave off various odors, and those anal retenders, ashamedly alluded to the no toilet excuse that the Versailles appeared to emulate.

But reverse ontology prevented such an inverted scenario before quantum theory could come up with mirroring effects within that great hall.
Meno_
The Invisible One
 
Posts: 13276
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage & ze beet goes on

Postby Meno_ » Sun Dec 12, 2021 9:27 pm

Then, the developments of war like phenomena had to be revised, positively, in defense of.

In defense of the iron clad machine that undermined the side of nature, which increasingly is becoming evident. So the struggle reverted to some kind of naturalistic, pre historic titanic struggle, best epitomized by a return to the natural forms of myth and religion.

President Carter saw this and declared an impasse in expansion, and was thereby relegated to dustbins similar to those of president Trump.

What comes now.

The colonies started to play a capital game of If you can not beat them then join them, abd began to tip the scale economically and psychologically away from the formerly allied partners.
So then what? The world had to accede to US power, for the Imperum was no longer nationalistic ideologically, but became a universal substantive crisis, with signs of impending call to arms.
The only way to stabilize and indemn ify a sinking impedium, abd sustain it's socio-psychological anchor, was to buy into emerging markets with new money.

And President Reagan was noteable in bankrupting a formed ally, as a first step to disintegrate, to quantumize a previously strongly bonded together other upcoming scented of The Other potential shift of power and assets, as a Fulcrum of stability to deal with.

The avoidance of the final struggle was the re-institution of the master and slave scenario, with congruent trappings that went along with it.

So is this scenario more like a spin off of some final solution, or a bid to play for more time?

What if the universal rate that may or may not sustain an across the board US style lifestyle come to appreciable terms across the board?

It' more likely then that future historians may refer to this time as merely a litmus test by which other byways of possibility will come into being

Will a 'Starwars' mind if duplicity be needed t I sustain the good versus or an evil empire to supercharge energy needed to sustain progress and productivity ? ( without which devolution into the abyss may be the only possible scenario left to work with.

Trump may be the very embodiment of acting, albeit preformed a-natural, i.e. acting himself, without regard to others.

His character assusenations en-mass would then diminish Wilks Booth's performance to a pityable B grade effort.

Maybe THE ACTOR is deemed to replace the politician of old from here on , as far as qualifying criteria is concerned.
Last edited by Meno_ on Sun Dec 12, 2021 9:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Meno_
The Invisible One
 
Posts: 13276
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage- & ze beet goes on

Postby Meno_ » Sun Dec 12, 2021 9:32 pm

And now. the interesting development:


Chris Wallace Quits Fox News for CNN After Years of Trump Attacks

Chris Wallace Quits Fox News for CNN After Years of Trump Attacks

U.S.
Donald Trump and Bill O'Reilly's Tour Begins With Empty Seats in Florida—Report

U.S. DONALD TRUMP BILL O'REILLY FLORIDA
Both Donald Trump and Bill O'Reilly touted huge crowds ahead of their "History Tour." But it kicked off at the FLA Live Arena in Sunrise, Florida, with many empty seats, according to local media.



"Massive crowd headed into FLA Live! The Trump/O'Reilly History show starts soon...," O'Reilly, the former Fox host, wrote on Twitter on Saturday.

"See you in Sunrise, FL, in a little while and tomorrow, Orlando," the former president said in a statement. "Big crowds!"





But the "cavernous" FLA Live Arena had many seats that remained empty, according to the Sun-Sentinel. The top level was closed off and those who had tickets for that area were "upgraded" to the lower bowl, the newspaper reported.

Pictures on social media showed the top tier of the arena completely empty, though it was not clear when they were taken, and empty seats dotted throughout the arena.

Trump entertained the crowd with comments mocking President Joe Biden, saying the United States was no longer great and repeating baseless claims that the 2020 election was stolen from him.


"Our country in my opinion is no longer respected," he said, according to the Sentinel. "Every country in the world takes advantage of the United States."


He later added: "It's a horrible thing to say but I don't feel America, right now, is great."


Bill O'Reilly Harassment Accuser Andrea Mackris Breaks NDA

Donald Trump's History Tour Has Thousands of Tickets Unsold

Donald Trump Set For Lucrative History Tour, Despite Shows Not Selling Out

Longtime Fox News Analyst Explains His Departure
At one point, Trump complimented his predecessor, former President Barack Obama, who he described as "smart and sharp."

"I liked him," Trump said of Obama, though he blamed him for causing "tremendous division" in the country."

Trump also told the crowd that he got along best with "tyrants" like Russia's Vladimir Putin and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un while in office.

"The ones I did the best with were the tyrants," he said. "For whatever reason, I got along great with Putin, I got along great with President Xi of China. I got along with Kim Jong Un of North Korea... and isn't that good? Isn't that better than having a nuclear war?"

Trump also spoke about the deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol on January 6, when a mob of his supporters stormed the building in a bid to stop the certification of Biden's electoral victory. "There was love in the air," Trump said.

Trump and O'Reilly's tour will head to Orlando's Amway Center on Sunday, before visiting Texas, with stops at the Toyota Center in Houston and the American Airlines Center in Dallas.

Newsweek previously reported that thousands of tickets for all four events were still widely available days before the tour began.

However, ones that did sell went for a minimum of $100 each and VIP and premium tickets went for several thousand dollars.

Trump's spokesperson has been contacted for comment.


© 2021 NEWSWEEK DIGITAL LLC
Meno_
The Invisible One
 
Posts: 13276
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage -synthèse volontaire?

Postby Meno_ » Sat Dec 25, 2021 8:19 pm

Just sayin' ( between biden&trump.)
Meno_
The Invisible One
 
Posts: 13276
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Fixed Cross » Mon Jan 03, 2022 10:03 pm

I miss Trumpie.

The strong do what they can, the weak accept what they must.
- Thucydides
Image
The Wheel - The Tree
User avatar
Fixed Cross
Doric Usurper
 
Posts: 11997
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2011 12:53 am
Location: Lightning

Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Urwrongx1000 » Tue Jan 04, 2022 3:25 am

Two more years...!
Urwrongx1000
ILP Legend
 
Posts: 7941
Joined: Mon Jun 19, 2017 5:10 pm

Re: Trump enters the stage

Postby Meno_ » Thu Jan 06, 2022 6:12 pm

Urwrongx1000 wrote:Two more years...!




Yes, and what appears to go down now is determined by perceptions rather than facts surrounding cults of personality.
Granted, Trump is far mire attractive as a comic jester in the court of monopoly, whereas Biden keeps wanting to throw out chains and balls whenever he lands on a go to jail card.

Secretely he is eyeing
hotel building on Broad-Way.

So it's 12 of one and half a dozen of the other.
Meno_
The Invisible One
 
Posts: 13276
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage - The political center ?

Postby Meno_ » Thu Jan 06, 2022 8:29 pm

OPINION

"In American politics today, the center is a lonely place to be.

President Trump has shifted the definition of conservatism, which has also caused a redefinition of centrism in America.(Associated Press)


Who is a moderate now? Who’s a centrist?

Until recently, the answer to such questions was primarily ideological. Centrists were middle-of-the roaders who rejected the purity of the ideological left and right. I will confess: I used to have considerable scorn for such people. They often acted as if being in the middle was a sign of intellectual superiority.

But the way I saw it, that ignored the fact that on some issues the ideologues were 100% right. Moreover, difference-splitting can be the worst option: If one side wants to build a bridge over a canyon and the other side doesn’t, the wisest possible position isn’t to build half a bridge that stops in thin air.


In recent years, though, the definition of centrism has been changing before our eyes as the culture has become more partisan. For instance, I haven’t changed my conservative views on most issues, but because I am a staunch critic of President Trump, many liberals now treat me as if I am a moderate or centrist. That makes sense if you think of Trump as a giant magnet next to our political compass. He serves as the true north for much of the right, which means much of the left reflexively marches south. That puts me somewhere like halfway between the two at east or west.

But I’ve come to believe there’s something else going on. Karen Stenner, an economist who studies authoritarianism, has identified what she calls an “authoritarian predisposition.” She is quick to note that authoritarianism isn’t synonymous with conservatism or any other ideological framework. Authoritarianism, she writes, “is a functional disposition concerned with maximizing ‘oneness’ and ‘sameness’ especially in conditions where the things that make us one and the same — common authority, and shared values — appear to be under threat.”

Historically, American conservatism has balanced conflicting impulses. It has been antagonistic to sudden, drastic, social change while at the same time it fully embraced — at least in theory — the free market. The problem is that economic liberty fuels change more than almost anything else. Joseph Schumpeter called the process “creative destruction,” as outdated means of production are replaced with new ones. Moreover, most conservatives were defenders of existing traditional institutions and norms. This deference to courts, elections and the rule of law put structural limits on the reach of culturally conservative programs.

A similar uneasy fusion endured on the left. In economics, capitalism was seen as something that needed to be harnessed and controlled. But in the cultural marketplace, the left had its own version of creative destruction.

These twin equilibriums have been breaking down before our eyes. Both left and right have their own versions of “cancel culture” now. Leading conservatives routinely heap scorn on “market fundamentalism,” championing everything from protectionism and industrial planning to state meddling in social media platforms (despite the fact that the right dominates the very outlets they insist are “censoring” them). Prominent intellectuals flirt with authoritarianism, and even monarchy.

On the left, hostility to free speech and open debate is at least as intense. In July, when a collection of intellectuals and writers — including such leftist luminaries as Noam Chomsky and Todd Gitlin — issued an open letter calling for a renewed commitment to free speech, leftwing blowback was intense.


It’s not just on issues of expression that the left’s liberal consensus has come apart. Due process on college campuses is now seen as reactionary. Religious liberty is fine, so long as it doesn’t permit deviation from progressive values. It is rapidly becoming a mainstream position on the left to favor packing the Supreme Court as soon as possible. It already is mainstream to favor abolishing the electoral college, the legislative filibuster and other bulwarks of republican government.

Stenner argues that the authoritarian predisposition is triggered when the settled order becomes unsettled and an instinctive panic sets in. Whatever the cause(s) of these chaotic times may be (I have my theories), I think the chaos has triggered vast numbers of people on the left and the right to embrace illiberalism.

Both movements share an antipathy toward the bedrock American and liberal right to be wrong, to live differently, to care about unfashionable things, or simply to not care about fashionable ones. Dissent is a kind of assault that must be policed and silenced, either by state or cultural power — or both. Conformity must be imposed. The twin fads of socialism and nationalism are best understood as competing attempts to impose sameness and order on each side’s own terms.


In this climate, the new centrists can be ideologically conservative or liberal according to the old definitions, but east and west share a common discomfort with the constant demand to catastrophize our politics in order impose orthodoxy on everyone. And amid the cacophony, such centrism can be quite lonely"
















































Jan. 5, 2022









Copyright © 2022, Los Angeles Times
Meno_
The Invisible One
 
Posts: 13276
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage - the beat goes on

Postby Meno_ » Sun Jan 16, 2022 7:53 pm

A recent headline:


"Steve Bannon said that speakers at Donald Trump's rally will decertify Joe Biden's electors in Arizona.
Law professors told Poynter there is no legal mechanism for decertifying the 2020 election results.
Some Republicans want Arizona's election results decertified despite audits affirming Biden's win."
Meno_
The Invisible One
 
Posts: 13276
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage - will trumpshow go on?

Postby Meno_ » Sun Jan 30, 2022 12:07 am

"Governor Asa Hutchinson, R-Ark., appears on "Meet the Press" in Washington, D.C., Sunday, Feb. 24, 2019. William B. Plowman/NBC/NBC Newswire/NBCUniversal via Getty Images

Trump dropped the biggest hint yet that he'll run for president again in 2024.

NGA Chairman Asa Hutchinson, the Republican governor of Arkansas, is against that idea.

He told Insider Trump shouldn't lead Republicans or the country again.

The Republican chairman of the National Governors Association said on Saturday that Donald Trump should not lead Republicans or the country again.

"I do not believe Trump is the one to lead our party and our country again, as president," Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson told Insider on the sidelines of the NGA Winter Meeting in Washington, DC.

Insider asked Hutchinson whether he wants Trump to run following a video that recently surfaced in which Trump declares on the golf course that he is "the 45th and the 47th" president.

Asked who should lead instead, Hutchinson said "that's what the election is all about."

There's many choices out there,  he added.

"And, you know, the Republican Party has many different voices," Hutchinson said. "And it's important in this time to have those voices and they should be concentrating on this election cycle."

Several Republican governors at the conference either said they were focusing on their state or the next election when asked about Trump's statement and whether they support him running.

"Any thought on 2024 is wasted energy at this time," said Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey, who leads the Republican Governors Association. "The elections that are in front of us are 2022, and that's what I'm focused on as the chairman of RGA."

Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt signed a bill last year that would name a stretch of highway in his state after the former president. When asked about Trump's future in presidential politics, Stitt said, "whatever the former president wants to do. I'm focused on Oklahoma right now, not all the national DC stuff."

Hutchinson, a two-term governor, was one of the first Republican governors to publicly push Trump to start a transition process with President Joe Biden after the 2020 election. He has said that Trump's continued attempts to discredit the 2020 election results could be a "disaster" for Republican candidates running for office this year.

"I've made it clear: This is about the future," he told Insider. "It's not about the past elections."

Earlier, he told reporters, "I don't believe the election was stolen. I respect the results."

Trump's golf course comments are the latest, and perhaps most pointed, in a series of hints that he plans to run for president in 2024.

To become an official candidate, Trump would have to raise or spend more than $5,000 specifically in support of a presidential campaign effort to officially register as a presidential candidate, according to Federal Election Commission guidelines."






* Copyright © 2022 Insider Inc. All rights reserved. 

International Editions:
Meno_
The Invisible One
 
Posts: 13276
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage and leaves through confusing exit

Postby Meno_ » Fri Feb 25, 2022 5:12 am

"Former President Donald Trump and many leading conservative figures have been praising Russian President Vladimir Putin as he threatens Ukraine with war. Meanwhile, many are also bashing President Joe Biden's attempts to deter Putin from an attack while trying to minimize the possibility of any direct combat between the nuclear superpowers.

While it's not unusual for former presidents to disagree with their successors on policy, it is unorthodox for them to shower a US adversary like Putin with flattery — particularly given the Russian leader is poised to launch a major military offensive on a US ally.

But this hasn't stopped Trump and some of his close allies from expressing admiration for Putin, including over the Russian president's misleading justifications to use force against Ukraine. The common thread in the Republican complaints seem to be attempts to blame the crisis Putin has stoked on Biden.

In an appearance on the "Clay Travis and Buck Sexton Show," Trump said Putin's justification for invading Ukraine was "savvy" and "genius."


"I went in yesterday, and there was a television screen, and I said, 'This is genius.' Putin declares a big portion of the Ukraine — of Ukraine — Putin declares it as independent. Oh, that's wonderful," Trump said. "I said, 'How smart is that?' And he's going to go in and be a peacekeeper."

The former president has also ripped into Biden's approach to the situation, suggesting that the sanctions he imposed were "weak" while claiming that the crisis never would have happened if he were in office.

Trump has conveniently left out that his first impeachment was, in part, due to the fact he withheld roughly $400 million in military aid to Ukraine while pressuring it to launch an investigation into Biden and his son Hunter over bogus allegations of corruption. Ukraine has heavily relied on US assistance while fighting a war against Kremlin-backed rebels, the war Putin claims to now be entering on behalf of Russian speakers.

Trump's former secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, has also routinely praised Putin in recent weeks — even as Russia has gathered tens of thousands of troops on Ukraine's border.


"He is a very talented statesman. He has lots of gifts," Pompeo said of Putin during a Fox News interview in January. "He was a KGB agent, for goodness sakes. He knows how to use power. We should respect that."

In an interview with the Center for the National Interest last week, Pompeo described Putin as "very shrewd" and "very capable."

Pompeo also expressed "enormous respect" for Putin, an authoritarian who has ruled over Russia for 20 years. The Russian leader, who has taken steps to ensure he can be president for life, is widely viewed as an enemy to democracy. Putin's opponents often end up dead or imprisoned. He bullies and threatens smaller countries that neighbor Russia — invading Georgia in 2008 and Ukraine in 2014 (and has invaded again in 2022). And, not to mention, Russia has interfered in US elections under Putin's watch, as he's sought to divide and weaken the country.

But Trump, Pompeo, and other conservatives like them apparently don't find these trends especially problematic.


Fox News' Tucker Carlson, the most-watched cable-news host and perhaps the most influential voice on the right beyond Trump, has repeatedly defended Putin on his show in recent months.

"It may be worth asking yourself, since it is getting pretty serious, what is this really about? Why do I hate Putin so much?" Carlson said on his show on Tuesday night. "Has Putin ever called me a racist? Has he threatened to get me fired for disagreeing with him?"

Carlson has echoed Putin's propaganda on Ukraine, characterizing it as a puppet of the US while bashing NATO.


The GOP's main position on the Ukraine crisis: It's Biden's fault
But the GOP has also splintered in many directions over Ukraine, which is perhaps a byproduct of the ways in which Trump has challenged the party's traditional stances on an array of issues — especially foreign policy.


A decade ago, it would've been unthinkable to see Republicans questioning support for NATO. In 2012, then-Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney described Russia as the top geopolitical foe of the US. But Trump adopted an unusually amicable disposition toward Russia, while habitually bashing NATO — at times raising concerns that the US was on the verge of leaving the alliance. In a party in which what Trump does and says increasingly sets the standard, this has opened the door for Republicans to follow suit.

Some congressional Republicans, like Sen. Josh Hawley of Missouri, have echoed the position of Carlson and effectively called for the US to stay out of it. Hawley recently questioned whether the US should support Ukraine's bid to join NATO, for example, as Russia calls for it to be permanently banned from the alliance. But others, like Sens. Ted Cruz of Texas, have called on Biden to take a far more aggressive stance.

"Europe is on the verge of war because of the weakness, the fecklessness of Joe Biden," Cruz recently told Fox News. The Texas Republican praised Biden on Wednesday, however, for moving to sanction the company behind Russia's Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline.

Meanwhile, Rep. Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, one of the few Republicans who has dared to publicly criticize Trump and has been ostracized as a result, ripped into his fellow House Republicans for criticizing Biden after the president announced new sanctions against Russia on Tuesday. In response to a tweet from House Republicans characterizing Biden as weak, Kinzinger wrote, "You can criticize policy but this is insane and feeds into Putins narrative. But hey, retweets amirite?"


Indeed, beyond outliers like Kinzinger, the GOP's only consistent position on the Ukraine crisis so far has been to blame Biden. Meanwhile, Ukraine has declared a state of emergency, and Putin could be on the verge of launching a major attack. :
Meno_
The Invisible One
 
Posts: 13276
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

Re: Trump enters the stage Trump in the middle

Postby Meno_ » Wed Mar 02, 2022 6:40 pm

As Biden leads free world against Putin, Trump equivocates:


— It is rare that a president can show he is living up to the mantle of "leader of the free world" — and even less common for him to do so against the backdrop of his main political rival praising an autocrat.

But that's what President Joe Biden did during his first State of the Union address, highlighting how he has led the Western world in defending Ukraine against Russia's invasion.


"Six days ago, Russia’s Vladimir Putin sought to shake the very foundations of the free world, thinking he could make it bend to his menacing ways. But he badly miscalculated," Biden said to a roaring, bipartisan standing ovation on the House floor Tuesday night.


"He thought he could divide us at home, in this chamber and in this nation," Biden continued. "He thought he could divide us in Europe, as well. But Putin was wrong. We are united, and that's what we did. We stayed united."

The one notable exception: former President Donald Trump.

Less than two weeks ago, Trump praised Putin as a "genius." On Saturday, during a speech to the Conservative Political Action Conference, he altered his formulation to blaming Western leaders for being "so dumb." And, just hours before the applause washed over Biden, Trump complained that Republicans, Democrats and the news media "misinterpret" his remarks about Ukraine — even as he again declined to directly criticize Putin.


"The Russian attack on Ukraine is appalling," he said Saturday night. "It is an outrage and an atrocity that should never have been allowed to occur."

Wherever Trump stands, it is not with Biden's anti-Putin legion. Biden is at the forefront of a global coalition that has isolated the Russian strongman, levied debilitating sanctions on him and rallied to provide aid and moral support to Ukrainian fighters.

"In the battle between democracy and autocracies, democracies are rising to the moment, and the world is clearly choosing the side of peace and security," Biden said Tuesday night.


It's not yet clear whether there will be any direct domestic political consequence to U.S. actions in Eastern Europe. That's because the outcome of Ukraine's battle to remain independent is in doubt and because most American voters don't cast ballots based primarily on foreign policy.


In normal times, a former president's position on a distant war would be politically irrelevant. But Trump appears to be lining up to run again in 2024, when Biden says he will be a candidate for re-election.

More important, for the time being, Trump's odd equivocation — the invasion is bad but Putin is blameless — is underscoring Biden's certitude at a time when Biden's approval ratings have been stuck below 40 percent.



POLITICS NEWS

As Biden leads free world against Putin, Trump equivocates
That is reflected in the fact that most Republicans in Congress are closer to Biden on Ukraine policy.

Trump, for example, mocked the U.S. and its European allies for threatening to sanction Putin if he invaded, suggesting their tack gave the Russian president a green light.

"'If you take over Ukraine, we’re going to sanction you,' they say," Trump said Saturday night. "Sanction, well that’s a pretty weak statement."

But Republicans in Congress have been supportive of U.S. sanctions on Russia, Putin and Putin's allies. Many of them have pressed the administration to levy heavier sanctions faster.

"I was pleased to hear President Biden’s call for national and world unity in support of our ally Ukraine as it faces a brutal assault from Russia," Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, said in a statement Tuesday night. "While the administration has now implemented the sanctions some of us called them to implement before the invasion occurred, I urge them to do even more on sanctions and use all of the tools at their disposal to hold President Putin accountable."

It was savvy of Biden to start his speech with the section on Ukraine — where his policy is most unifying — because even casual viewers would see images of Republicans and Democrats applauding as he led the American government in making a forceful statement of support.

But if there was any doubt about the larger role Biden sees himself in, he clarified by using the phrase "free world" three times.

"The free world is holding him accountable," Biden said of Putin. "When the history of this era is written, Putin’s war on Ukraine will have left Russia weaker and the rest of the world stronger."

And if the free world is stronger, so is its leader.


Jonathan Allen is a senior national politics reporter for NBC

News, based in Washington.
Meno_
The Invisible One
 
Posts: 13276
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:39 am
Location: Mysterium Tremendum

PreviousNext

Return to Current Events



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users